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  1. #1
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    New to Campy. What grp set to choose

    Hi,

    For past 4 yrs i'm using Shimano Ultegra on my Oltre. Then one day my friend told me I ought to try our Campy as he reckoned I should able to feel the difference.

    I like to seek advise this there any difference bet Chorus, Record and Super Record or much big difference bet Record and Super Record. I understand the latter is pricey, however lets just say price is not an issue, but still wish not to spend foolishly if there is merely a tad difference in any of them, more so shld not be a mental thing. I'm ok not to seek for the best in name sake.

    If I were to choose Chorus, dos it equal to Shimano 105?

    Tks for advise

  2. #2
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    The difference between Chorus and record and SuperRecord....is a giant pile of money, and a handful of grams saved in some very esoteric places.

    Chorus shifts IMHO nicer than 105. Granted the ergonomics are different as is the action. Whereas 105 (and all Shimano roadie groups AFAIK) shift when you release the lever after the lever-swing, Campag shifts at the lever swing itself. Much more immediate. There's also the multiple up/down shifting as well.

    IMHO IME YMMV etc etc


    Only catches...consumables are hard to find and expensive. Particularly cassettes. You'll pay 3X for a Chorus cassette what you can get a 105 or Ultegra cassette for online through the same etailors.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  3. #3
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    I'd say that the money spent on Record and Super Record is money spent on WOW factor. I'm all about Chorus, got it on two bikes, one 10spd and the other 11spd, and never an issue with either. But like Marc said the 11spd cassettes can be a mite pricey, not so much the 10spd though. Whenever Campagnolo upgrades their lesser groups to 11spd I expect the price of those cassettes to come down. Well I hope so anyway.

    I'd say that Chorus is a few steps above 105, probably above Ultegra also. Comparable to Dura Ace perhaps?
    Too old to ride plastic

  4. #4
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    This.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    ...Only catches...consumables are hard to find and expensive. Particularly cassettes. You'll pay 3X for a Chorus cassette what you can get a 105 or Ultegra cassette for online through the same etailors.
    FWIW, Chorus cassettes can be found for about $100, while "Miche" Campy compatible from $45-$65.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by novetan View Post
    Hi,

    For past 4 yrs i'm using Shimano Ultegra on my Oltre. Then one day my friend told me I ought to try our Campy as he reckoned I should able to feel the difference.
    Not what you asked about but:

    You'll definitely feel a difference but it's not necessarily better or worse. You really should try it first to see what you think ergonomics wise.

    Personally the thumb thing is a deal breaker for me. I hate it ergonomically speaking. (shifting is perfectly fine) I suspect I would get used to it and be fine with it after a while but I wasn't willing to invest the money and lose the ability to have any bike shop anywhere be able to help me if I needed it in a pinch to find out.

    Also, supposedly Shimano/Sram 11 speed wheels will work fine with Campy but you may want to ultra verify that if you have a lot invested in wheels you want to keep using.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by colnagoG60 View Post
    FWIW, Chorus cassettes can be found for about $100, while "Miche" Campy compatible from $45-$65.
    $100 is 3x and everything I've read about Miche is their products are trash.
    However like I alluded to in my other post, maybe no need for Campy specific wheels with 11 speed.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    $100 is 3x and everything I've read about Miche is their products are trash.
    However like I alluded to in my other post, maybe no need for Campy specific wheels with 11 speed.
    Come to think of it, I think you're right and since the advent of 11spd all three, Campagnolo, Shimano and SRAM all share the same cog spacing.
    Too old to ride plastic

  9. #9
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    I'm a hardcore campy guy but I recently got a custom gravel bike with an Ultegra 8000 drivetrain with 685 shifters with disc. The derailleurs are really nice and the shifting is very precise. The front derailleur may be the best ever, such precise movement. But yeah, Chorus works exactly the same as Record and Super Record, just a little heavier. I have a road bike with new Chorus and it works just fine. I'd put Chorus between Ultegra and Dura Ace.
    Retired sailor

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Personally the thumb thing is a deal breaker for me. I hate it ergonomically speaking. (shifting is perfectly fine) I suspect I would get used to it and be fine with it after a while but I wasn't willing to invest the money and lose the ability to have any bike shop anywhere be able to help me if I needed it in a pinch to find out.
    I went from Shimano to Campy and posted little bit on it in the following link. From Campy to Shimano...Your thoughts and mine.

    I did get used to it and now it's fine with me. I'm staying with Campy because I like the quicker shifting of rear as demonstrated by this guy.



    Also, supposedly Shimano/Sram 11 speed wheels will work fine with Campy but you may want to ultra verify that if you have a lot invested in wheels you want to keep using.
    It's the freehub body that needs to be changed to Campy specific for rear.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    It's the freehub body that needs to be changed to Campy specific for rear.
    Actually an 11spd Shimano hub and cassette will work with Campagnolo shifters and derailleurs, and vici-verci.

    Technical FAQ: 10/11-speed compatibility | VeloNews.com

    from link...

    And, as Iíve said before, there is 100 percent shifting compatibility between 11-speed cassettes. In other words, Shimano, SRAM, and Campagnolo 11-speed cassettes work just fine on each othersí drivetrains
    Read more at Technical FAQ: 10/11-speed compatibility | VeloNews.com
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    $100 is 3x and everything I've read about Miche is their products are trash.
    However like I alluded to in my other post, maybe no need for Campy specific wheels with 11 speed.
    Fair enough. I haven't had any issues with my Miche 9 nor 11sp cassettes...though I don't stress them as much as someone who races, or does more than 3k miles per year. That said, they were bought for secondary wheels, and Kickr use.

  13. #13
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    In my experience, Campag chains and cassettes last about twice as long as Shimano. Add labour and prices even out pretty well.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I'd say that Chorus is a few steps above 105, probably above Ultegra also. Comparable to Dura Ace perhaps?
    This pretty much sums up the widely discussed topic.

  15. #15
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    Both Shimano and Campy make nice, well functioning components. I wouldn't say one is necessarily better than the other.

    1. The shape of the hoods differ quite a bit -- its a personal; choice what you like
    2. The shifting mechanism is different -- Shimano is smoother, Campy has a more tactile click to it.
    3. The shifters work differently -- you can drop a bunch of gears with Campy with a single push on the shifter. Shimano is one click, one gear, Both are similar going the other direction (from smaller to bigger cogs).
    4. Campy used to have a more classic look to it, but unfortunately has moved to ugly cranks that resemble the Shimano 'star wars' cranks.

    I rode Shimano Dura Ace for years and years. My wife has two bikes with 9000 and 9100 on them. It does shift nice. I have four bikes with Campy Chorus. (all 11-speed). I'm happy with it. Like others have said, all you get with Record or Super Record is a little less weight due to the use of some titanium and carbon bits and pieces. Mechanically, Chorus is identical. I think the extra money is way better spent on something like better wheels. As far as comparing the line ups, I'd put Chorus in between Ultegra and Dura Ace.

  16. #16
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    Go with what you can afford.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I'd say that Chorus is a few steps above 105, probably above Ultegra also. Comparable to Dura Ace perhaps?
    I'd say Record is comparable to Dura-Ace.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notvintage View Post
    I'd say Record is comparable to Dura-Ace.
    I'd say it's pointless to compare. If you're talking about weight, that's totally objective so opinions are not necessary. And if you're talking about function they all work the same (Shimano, I haven't used all Campy options) so I'm not sure what people could be ranking that's subjective. Durability? Snob appeal?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Durability? Snob appeal?
    I would say both but more like 49% : 51% ratio.

  20. #20
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    To me, the groupset choice comes down to what feels best under the fingers and under the palms. For me, that's Campy. I also have a strange aversion to mechanical Shimano's swinging brake levers. Of course, electric shimmy renders this complaint moot.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    To me, the groupset choice comes down to what feels best under the fingers and under the palms. For me, that's Campy.
    This ^^^

    Comfort for all contact points is a top priority for me. Because that is hours and hours of constant contact.

    I do like the shifting action of Campy, but I am sure I would be fine with Shimano were I to use it for more than a test ride.
    .
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  22. #22
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    Just did a hilly 20-something mile ride on with my first ever Campy groupset, Chorus 11-spd. Coming from 6600, 6700, 6800, and 105 bikes, I have to say that shifting does seem more tactile, as someone above put it, very nice feel. Shifting is also very quick... I've lost plenty of races but none were due to slower Shimano shifting.
    Bling factor can't be denied either, beautiful!!!
    But WTH is up with that thumb shifter? Once settled into the hoods it seems like you have to move your palm outward or rearward to get my thumb on the shifter, it's definitely not there at the tip of my thumb. Also, when in the drops I have to keep my hands as high as possible to reach the shifter, is that normal for these or do I have to rotate the bars down or lower the shifters?
    Shifting is great, but ergonomically-speaking I have to say they're on Sora-level. Guess I'll have to get some more rides in before I decide whether or not I can adjust.
    In reference to the Assault on Mt Mitchell...
    Quote Originally Posted by merckx56
    The easier solution is to find a biker bar in Spartanburg the night before, go in and pick a fight. The ass-whipping you'll get will be far less painful than the one Mitchell will give you the next day!

  23. #23
    Devoid of all flim-flam
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    But WTH is up with that thumb shifter? Once settled into the hoods it seems like you have to move your palm outward or rearward to get my thumb on the shifter, it's definitely not there at the tip of my thumb. Also, when in the drops I have to keep my hands as high as possible to reach the shifter, is that normal for these or do I have to rotate the bars down or lower the shifters?
    Ergonomics will always be a compromise. It's the way of the world. Just as it is with saddle comfort. Luckily, there are choices out there.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    Ergonomics will always be a compromise. It's the way of the world. Just as it is with saddle comfort. Luckily, there are choices out there.
    Very true.
    In reference to the Assault on Mt Mitchell...
    Quote Originally Posted by merckx56
    The easier solution is to find a biker bar in Spartanburg the night before, go in and pick a fight. The ass-whipping you'll get will be far less painful than the one Mitchell will give you the next day!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    Just did a hilly 20-something mile ride on with my first ever Campy groupset, Chorus 11-spd. Coming from 6600, 6700, 6800, and 105 bikes, I have to say that shifting does seem more tactile, as someone above put it, very nice feel. Shifting is also very quick... I've lost plenty of races but none were due to slower Shimano shifting.
    Bling factor can't be denied either, beautiful!!!
    But WTH is up with that thumb shifter? Once settled into the hoods it seems like you have to move your palm outward or rearward to get my thumb on the shifter, it's definitely not there at the tip of my thumb. Also, when in the drops I have to keep my hands as high as possible to reach the shifter, is that normal for these or do I have to rotate the bars down or lower the shifters?
    Shifting is great, but ergonomically-speaking I have to say they're on Sora-level. Guess I'll have to get some more rides in before I decide whether or not I can adjust.
    I've never had issues reaching the shifters, I imagine that you'll just have to adjust to something new. The thumb shifters may not be at the tip of my thumb, but all I need to do is drop my thumb off the hood and push. When in the drops I may have to reach a bit, but I've never really thought about it till now. I don't know, maybe I have larger hands.

    But then I grew up with down tube shifters, so moving my hands a bit on the bars ain't nuthin'.
    Too old to ride plastic

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