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  1. #1
    pmf
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    New chain and cassette at 4000 miles?

    I usually get more life out of them than that (this is Campy Chorus 11-speed). I keep my drive train pretty clean. Could the chain ring really be toast after that short of a time? I rarely ever replace chain rings.

    I'm kind of new to Campy. I'd been riding Dura Ace 7700 for years -- that stuff lasted forever.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I usually get more life out of them than that (this is Campy Chorus 11-speed). I keep my drive train pretty clean. Could the chain ring really be toast after that short of a time? I rarely ever replace chain rings.

    I'm kind of new to Campy. I'd been riding Dura Ace 7700 for years -- that stuff lasted forever.
    Seems really odd that you'd wear out a chainring in 4000mi. How worn is the chain? Campy chains will generally outlast Shimano by quite a margin.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Campy chains will generally outlast Shimano by quite a margin.

    Even comparing 11 speed to 9 speed?

    I've never used Campy Chorus 11 or 7700 9 speed chains but 4000 miles on a chain sounds fairly ordinary to me. Actually about double what I get out of a current Shimano 11 speed chain.

    I seriously doubt your chain ring is even close to toast.

  4. #4
    pmf
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    I was riding home last night from work and suddenly the bike won't shift into the last three (smallest) cogs on the cassette. The shifter clicked, but the rear derailer wouldn't move. I ride right by the LBS I've been using for years, so I stopped in and had them look at it. I get the new kid mechanic who says the derailer is a little out of adjustment, but the real problem is the chain and cassette are worn and the big ring is worn (shark tooth). Of course I can't see anything that close up w/o my glasses. I get home and some of the black finish is worn off the teeth, but they look OK to me (a new ring is $120). I need to get one of those chain measuring tools. Can you recommend something?

    I can't believe this stuff would wear out in 4000 miles. I've got another Campy equipped bike with way more miles that works perfect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I was riding home last night from work and suddenly the bike won't shift into the last three (smallest) cogs on the cassette. The shifter clicked, but the rear derailer wouldn't move. I ride right by the LBS I've been using for years, so I stopped in and had them look at it. I get the new kid mechanic who says the derailer is a little out of adjustment, but the real problem is the chain and cassette are worn and the big ring is worn (shark tooth). Of course I can't see anything that close up w/o my glasses. I get home and some of the black finish is worn off the teeth, but they look OK to me (a new ring is $120). I need to get one of those chain measuring tools. Can you recommend something?

    I can't believe this stuff would wear out in 4000 miles. I've got another Campy equipped bike with way more miles that works perfect.
    Worn chains and cassettes don't "suddenly" stop going into three cogs.


    Sounds like a clear cut case of your cable isn't releasing like the shifter is telling it to. Either a fray somewhere or gunked up.

    Your chain and cassette may be worn. But that's a different topic from what you described.

  6. #6
    pmf
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    That's kind of what I expected.

  7. #7
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    I think the 'new mechanic' is clueless, like many. Sounds way more like a fraying cable or something other than a worn out chainring. Did you end up checking how worn the chain is? Unless it's completely trashed there's now way the ring is that worn...and as Jay posted the shifting in the rear has nothing to do w/ a worn chainring.
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    It the chainring and cassette(s) worn out after 4000 miles? Of course, it is possible. But it is unlikely for the cassette and even more unlikely for the chainring. Heck, I would say the chain is by far more likely to be worn first as compared to cassette and ring---especially if you properly clean and lube.

    Note my chainrings are just fine and currently have about 13,000 miles on them. I swapped out the cassette for a different setup but the old cassette was still fine at 12,000 miles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    It the chainring and cassette(s) worn out after 4000 miles? Of course, it is possible. But it is unlikely for the cassette and even more unlikely for the chainring. Heck, I would say the chain is by far more likely to be worn first as compared to cassette and ring---especially if you properly clean and lube.

    Note my chainrings are just fine and currently have about 13,000 miles on them. I swapped out the cassette for a different setup but the old cassette was still fine at 12,000 miles.
    Regardless, the amount of wear to his chain, cogs and rings is totally irrelevant to this: "suddenly the bike won't shift into the last three (smallest) cogs on the cassette. The shifter clicked, but the rear derailer wouldn't move."

    It might be theoretically possible for a chain and cog to be so worn that the chain gets stuck on the cog. But no way that would happen suddenly without some major warning signs getting to that point. And it most certainly has nothing to do with front chain rings.

    OP, there was a post a while ago about someone who had a campy der. stop working. Same symptoms I believe. I'd definitely check for cable fray/junk first but I suppose it could be the der.

    Maybe look for the post I'm talking about. Although, there was a lot of mystery and suspect information if I remember correctly.
    Last edited by Jay Strongbow; 2 Weeks Ago at 03:07 PM.

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    This is the thread I'm talking about. Campagnolo says brand-new custom frame derailleur hanger off spec... gah!

    I'd highly recommend NOT reading it. Just mention it in the context of an example of how a busted der. can cause what you're experiencing.

    I wouldn't be shocked if that guy has the same boob mechanic you went to.
    Last edited by Jay Strongbow; 2 Weeks Ago at 03:19 PM.

  11. #11
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    I go through chains about every 2000-2500 mi. Get a chain wear checker. They don’t cost much and will definitively settle the mystery.
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    4000 miles on a chain seems like a reasonable life, not chain rings or cassette unless they have been abused or in very dirty conditions. Sounds more like a cable issue to me - laggy shifting to the small cogs normally precedes it not shifting in my experience when the cable is getting frayed.

    Easy enough to test if it's the cable - disconnect it at the rear DR and shift up and down through the range at the shifter and see if the cable moves freely. Of course you will need to be ready to readjust the rear DR when you are done with the test, so only do it if you are comfortable taking that on.
    Last edited by Srode; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:25 AM.
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  13. #13
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I need to get one of those chain measuring tools.
    Just use a tape measure. Everyone has one and they're more accurate than a chain checker.
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    Can you recommend something?
    I can recommend never going back to that shop.
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I was riding home last night from work and suddenly the bike won't shift into the last three (smallest) cogs on the cassette. The shifter clicked, but the rear derailer wouldn't move. I ride right by the LBS I've been using for years, so I stopped in and had them look at it. I get the new kid mechanic who says the derailer is a little out of adjustment, but the real problem is the chain and cassette are worn and the big ring is worn (shark tooth). Of course I can't see anything that close up w/o my glasses. I get home and some of the black finish is worn off the teeth, but they look OK to me (a new ring is $120). I need to get one of those chain measuring tools. Can you recommend something?

    I can't believe this stuff would wear out in 4000 miles. I've got another Campy equipped bike with way more miles that works perfect.
    Do you like bologna? I think your new kid mechanic is feeding some to you at $4.95/lb.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndreSF View Post
    I go through chains about every 2000-2500 mi. Get a chain wear checker. They don’t cost much and will definitively settle the mystery.
    Really? If you are getting only 2000-2500 mi. out of your chains, you must either not be lubing your chain properly, are over 250lbs., an extremely strong rider or you ride in rain and wet roads a lot.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Really? If you are getting only 2000-2500 mi. out of your chains, you must either not be lubing your chain properly, are over 250lbs., an extremely strong rider or you ride in rain and wet roads a lot.
    I live in San Francisco. It's nothing but stop and start with lots of hills. It's hard on a chain. I diligently clean and lube my drivetrain.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndreSF View Post
    I go through chains about every 2000-2500 mi. Get a chain wear checker. They don’t cost much and will definitively settle the mystery.
    Chain checkers are notoriously innacurate. A tape measure is all you need - replace the chain when it has elongated 0.5% (1/16 inches in 12 inches original length - 24 links). Chain checkers frequently suggest the chain is worn out when it has many miles left. Maybe your chains are actually worn out at 2K miles, and maybe they're not.

    How many miles you get out of a chain depends a lot on riding conditions, rider power output, chain quality, and whether there has been any "incidents" where the chain got seriously stressed.

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