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Thread: New Crankset

  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Exclamation New Crankset

    Hello everyone I need your help please.
    I have a 2008 Fuji Touring Bike with a Truvativ Touro 3.1 Alloy 30/42/52 factory crankest and want to change it to a Shimano Deore M591 Crankset with Bottom Bracket (170mm, 48/36/26) and like to do my own work.
    My questions are as follows will it be hard to change the crank and bottom bracket ?
    Will the M591 fit my bike ?
    What tools will I need to complete the job ?
    I have a lot of bicycle tools but nothing for the crank and bottom bracket.
    Also I run a 11/34 cassette will I have to shorten the chain ?
    I plan on replacing cassette,chain,crank and bottom bracket.
    I have the tools for the removal of the cassette.
    I thank you for your time and appreciate any help I can get with this.
    Remember it's mind over matter
    if you don't mind it doesn't matter

    Ride more drive less

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    1) Sort of - you need a specific tool for the crank and bottom bracket you want to remove, and another, also specific tool for the one you want to install. It can take a lot of torque to get the old crank off, so a breaker bar is nice to have. Installing the new crank will be pretty easy. If it hasn't been done, you might benefit from having your bottom bracket shell faced.
    2) I think so. Given the year of your bike and the type of crank that's on there, you most likely have an English-threaded bottom bracket. The M591 will go right on. The instructions will tell you what arrangement of spacers to use.
    3) Crank puller, bottom bracket tool for the old bottom bracket, bottom bracket tool and bearing preload tool for the new crank and bottom bracket. The preload tool should come with your crank if you buy one in retail packaging (and I remember correctly) but the others, you'd have to buy. I don't think it's worth it to buy the crank puller and bottom bracket tool unless you're keeping a different bike with an internal bottom bracket. I do think it's worth it to have tools on hand to service what's actually on my bike, so the tool for the new one, to me, would be worthwhile.
    4) I don't know, figure it out. It's no big deal. Maybe a link or two. If you're replacing the chain anyway, you'll have to shorten the new one even if you don't replace anything else.

    If you're using the bike for tour, I bet you'll really like the new crankset. You can use as small as a 22t granny ring if you decide you need that later. Good for riding up the side of a building with 80 lb in your panniers.

    The only thing you should know before doing this is that mountain bike cranks have a pretty wide chainline. There are a few purpose-built road touring cranks out there that would do a little better at this. See velo-orange.com.

    EDIT: I should revise 1) to "easy with the right tools, huge pain without them."

  3. #3
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    OK Everyone instead of starting a new thread I have a new question.
    Would it be better then to replace the bottom bracket and new crankset or just replace the chainrings ?
    I have already replaced the cassette and chain.
    Thank you for your time.
    Remember it's mind over matter
    if you don't mind it doesn't matter

    Ride more drive less

  4. #4
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    It really depends how nice your crank is and how many chain rings you're replacing.

    Chain rings tend to come in around $30 each. Although you can pay more if you want to, and you can pay a little less.

    If you have a nice crank and need one ring, it's a no-brainer to replace the ring. If you're thinking about one of the $90 MTB cranks on Jenson, like the one you mentioned, you'll probably save some money replacing the entire crank, especially since (IIRC) it comes with the bottom bracket. I wouldn't have to think too much about replacing the Touro crank.

  5. #5
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    AndrwSwitch thanks for your replies much appreciated.
    Remember it's mind over matter
    if you don't mind it doesn't matter

    Ride more drive less

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