Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    354

    Pedal Cleat width relation to leg power/soreness?

    What is the proper way to determine cleat positioning width-wise? I am using a pair of Keo Carbon pedals, and the cleats have some lateral movement-maybe about 4-5mm. How does one determine the proper position for the pedals? I have mine set about 1mm from the most "foot inward" position (foot toward the crankarm). As a result, my inner thigh has been very sore the past few days, with the outer thigh having almost no soreness. I am somewhat narrow for an American (28-inch waist) so I figured that I should have the feet in pretty close to the BB. I always hear the commonly-used phrase that "the closer you can get to the BB, the more power you produce".

    Is my leg soreness an indication that my feet need to be positioned further outward? It seems that if only my inner thigh (the innermost 1/3) is getting worked, I may not be using the rest of my thigh effectively.

  2. #2
    Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
    Reputation: bikeboy389's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    9,422
    Two things.

    1. It's your hip, knee and ankle alignment, not your waist size that dictates how much Q factor (that's what you're asking about) you need. A skinny or small guy might still need some extra width if his leg alignment is unusual, so there's no reason to think you needed to go for the closest setting. Also, I have only known Q factor problems to cause knee pain, so if your knees are OK and your heels aren't hitting the frame, you're probably OK. I would have started with a middle-of-the-road setting, though. Also, I've never heard your axiom about keeping close to the BB, and I doubt physics would bear this theory out unless your frame was made of rubber or something.

    2. It's possible, if you're not used to riding, that you would have gotten your inner-thigh pain no matter how your pedals were set up. The inner thigh is used a lot in cycling (especially if you're a knees-tight kind of rider--which used to be the big thing: Knees in to go fast. But it's turned out to not be such a big deal after all.), but not much otherwise. What you may be feeling is that your whole leg is getting a workout, but only the inner thigh is out of shape enough for you to feel it later. This may go away after a week or so or a good day or two of rest.

    If you are really concerned about your Q factor, your best (and possibly only) recourse is an experienced bike fitter.
    "jazz gives you large testicles"--aliensporebomb

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    354
    Okay, thanks for the info. I am getting re-fit in a few days, I will have somebody check me out when I am on the bike. Actually, today my Keo cleat came loose and migrated a bit-it went a couple of mm wider, and that leg actually felt smoother and more powerful than the one with the foot a bit more inward. So I bet the shoes could come out a bit. It is so hard to know what is correct and what isn't. Plus, on those Keo pedals, they tend to work loose unless you rough them up a bit.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

INTERBIKE

Contest

Hot Deals See All Hot Deals >>

Interbike Featured Booths

Check out the hottest road bike products from these brands!



















See All Interbike Coverage - Click Here »


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook