View Poll Results: Is electronic good?

Voters
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  • Yes - I bought it, want it, would buy it again, etc...

    31 63.27%
  • No - not for me, under any circumstances, ever

    18 36.73%
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  1. #1
    irony intended
    Reputation: carlislegeorge's Avatar
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    POLL - Do you like electronic shifting? FOR THOSE WITH ACTUAL RIDE EXPERIENCE

    Title says it all. If you have experience using electronic, Shimano or Campy doesn't matter. Extended test rides acceptable case use.
    Last edited by carlislegeorge; 02-16-2013 at 10:26 AM.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Love the front shifting, not crazy about the rear shifting (rear works fine, just feels kind of funny/different, I suspect I'd get used to it, I've only tried it on an extended test ride).

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: looigi's Avatar
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    Had good test rides with Campy and Ultegra DI. Both worked perfectly shifting FD or RD. FD shifting was especially good shifting cleanly, even under significant load. Agree rear was different...sort of a delay between clicking the lever and shifting. With mechanical, it shifts when the lever moves, not after. However, I cannot really fault it, but don't want it. I like the idea of a bike being mechanically operated by the rider and not needing to be charged up in order to ride, even if infrequently.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  4. #4
    Steaming piles of opinion
    Reputation: danl1's Avatar
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    Poll misses the "meh - whatever" option.

    Rode it, liked it, but not enough to pay for it - plus, I still appreciate the essential simplicity of a mechanical system.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  5. #5
    Elmira > Taiwan > Elmira
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    Yes, definitely liked it. Looking to upgrade in the not too distant future. My report:

    I Rode EPS !!!!
    2005 Ritchey BreakAway (steel)
    Full Campagnolo compact drivetrain - Chorus 11sp
    (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Proton wheels
    Cateye CC-TR300TW V3
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Gobi saddle and bar tape
    BeBop Pedals

  6. #6
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    If you want to upgrade to electronic, go for it. Most people don't realize how affordable it is. Shimano is the value leader with the ultegra.

    I just bought a full monocoque carbon framed Neuvation FC-500 with full ultegra components, for right at $3150 just 6 months ago. This bike is a dream to drive and ride and is smooth as silk and responds when asked to.

    I test drove a Trek 5.9 extensively at my local shop, and I have to say my neuvation smokes it for smoothness of ride and responsiveness. And, drum roll please, the trek was $1500 higher and is also made in tiwan.

    Look for value when you purchase a bike. You can get great bikes for reasonable prices if you look beyond the big name brands.
    Last edited by jackmen; 02-17-2013 at 05:04 AM.

  7. #7
    Dr. Buzz Killington
    Reputation: SauronHimself's Avatar
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    If you're on the fence or a complete naysayer, at least test ride some EPS or Di2 bikes and then weigh the pros and cons.

  8. #8
    Flash! ah–ahhh!
    Reputation: SystemShock's Avatar
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    Have nothing against electronic, just don't NEED it. Feels like a solution in search of a problem.
    Monkhouse: I want to die like my Dad did, peacefully, in his sleep... not screaming in terror like his passengers.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackmen View Post
    I just bought a full Monique carbon framed Neuvation FC-500
    What the heck is "full Monique carbon"?

  10. #10
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    I went from 7800 DA to 7970 and just recently to 9070 DA. Di2 shifting is amazing, front and rear, especially on the latest version. Going back to 7800 every now and then is nice for something different, but it's got nothing on the latest electric shifting.
    Trailflix - Now with forums and on Facebook.
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  11. #11
    Elmira > Taiwan > Elmira
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    What the heck is "full Monique carbon"?
    Well, they always said carbon was sexy...
    2005 Ritchey BreakAway (steel)
    Full Campagnolo compact drivetrain - Chorus 11sp
    (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Proton wheels
    Cateye CC-TR300TW V3
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Gobi saddle and bar tape
    BeBop Pedals

  12. #12
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    2,500 miles on Campy EPS. Love it. So far I've recharged the battery twice. Also rode Di2, and it's excellent.

    Electronic gives almost no competitive advantage, but it's awesome.

  13. #13
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    Test rode a bike that had it. Didn't think I would like it,but it did shift very crisp and effecient. I ended up not including it on my last build, but I could see it in my future down the road.

  14. #14
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    Love it. EPS all the way. Powerful front shifting, auto trim, and Campy feel.
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  15. #15
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    I have test ridden maybe 15 miles on Di2. I agree there needs to be a middle ground in your poll. Putting aside the fact that I use Campy and didn't like the Shimano levers I would not and did not pay extra for the electronic shifting. I like the mechanical feedback and did not see any advantages to electronic shifting besides being cool.
    That being said, my bike is more than a utilitarian thing I ride. So I will probably go from Record mechanical to SR EPS one day for the fun of it - just not at current prices.

    FWIW if you ever ride with gloves you should try electronic with them on. I have no experience but it seems to me that Di2 would be difficult to use with thick gloves.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Bought a new bike about a month or so ago with Di2 and love it. My lbs has updated the firmware and multi shift is awesome, the hoods are perfect IMHO. I've been using thick gloves and there is no problem shifting, every single shift has just been perfect. I love it so much I'll never go mechanical again.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Having ridden it I fall firmly into, its nice but I don't need it camp.

    Add to that the replacement cost would make me decide against it. If I take out a lever in a race now I can just take one off another bike while I get it replaced or fix it (yes I can fix my SRAM levers). With electronic I would have to buy a new lever (the usually bit that takes the most abuse in a crash) or rebuild the entire bike with bits off another bike.

  18. #18
    irony intended
    Reputation: carlislegeorge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steel rider View Post
    ...I agree there needs to be a middle ground in your poll....
    There are several qualifiers for each option in my poll here. Any answer can fit into the yes/no category, in this case. The rest of your response would lead me to believe you answered in the affirmative.

    Truth in lending, I'm a Di2 owner/believer.

  19. #19
    Elmira > Taiwan > Elmira
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlislegeorge View Post
    Truth in lending, I'm a Di2 owner/believer.
    Well, we won't hold that against you!
    2005 Ritchey BreakAway (steel)
    Full Campagnolo compact drivetrain - Chorus 11sp
    (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Proton wheels
    Cateye CC-TR300TW V3
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Gobi saddle and bar tape
    BeBop Pedals

  20. #20
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    Ultegra di2 owner here on my giant. Just built a litespeed with 2012 sram red. Electronics hands Down.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by steel rider View Post
    FWIW if you ever ride with gloves you should try electronic with them on. I have no experience but it seems to me that Di2 would be difficult to use with thick gloves.
    Using Di2 with full finger gloves is not a problem. I wear Mavic Eclipse gloves with no problems hitting the correct buttons for shifting.
    Trailflix - Now with forums and on Facebook.
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  22. #22
    Elmira > Taiwan > Elmira
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    Quote Originally Posted by crank1979 View Post
    Using Di2 with full finger gloves is not a problem. I wear Mavic Eclipse gloves with no problems hitting the correct buttons for shifting.
    Note that this problem has been mentioned in review and road test articles.
    2005 Ritchey BreakAway (steel)
    Full Campagnolo compact drivetrain - Chorus 11sp
    (50, 34 & 12-29)
    Proton wheels
    Cateye CC-TR300TW V3
    Ritchey fork, stem, headset, bars and seatpost
    Fizik Gobi saddle and bar tape
    BeBop Pedals

  23. #23
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    ultegra di2 provides an awesome experience, particularly on the big ring. you can stomp on a climb, doing all manner of silly things that would drop your chain on mechanical and never have a problem. also, there is one particular section on my route (when i lived in denver) which always found me at a traffic light just at the bottom of the hill. invariably as i tok off back up the hill i would go, "uh oh", lose all momentum gearing back down. with di2, problem solved.

    not a "must have" in the same way high end carbon frames and light wheels are not "must haves" (i.e, if you can afford it, you definitely should treat yourself to it.)

  24. #24
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    I've been on the Ultegra di2 for about a year now, and love it. I just updated the firmware to add multishift and love it even more. I was certainly happy with mechanical shifting prior to the upgrade, but could never go back. It's kind of like heated seats in my car, I didn't know what I was missing until my tush was toasty on those cold winter mornings.

  25. #25
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    I can't wait to try / own it.
    I'm tired of cable stretch and messing with adjustments.
    Call me lazy, but when I'm out on a long ride, the last thing I want to do is stop and mess with my cable adjusters.

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