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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Putting together a tool/home mechanic kit

    So, after too many bad experiences with too many shops I have decided to take 95% of my bike wrenching in house. I am mechanically inclined, and am comfortable doing most things already. I'm not afraid to tackle anything with a good set of instructions.

    A little information about my bike. I currently ride a Specialized Tarmac S-Works SL3. I have the full Campagnolo SR11 groupset. I have a few wheel sets, but spend most my time with Mavic Cosmic Carbone SL's with PowerTap.

    Here's what I have in my shopping cart at RealCyclist.com so far.

    Park Tool Torque Wrench - TW-2 (3/8in drive)
    Park Tool Chain Checker - CC-2
    Park Tool 11-Speed Compatible ChainWhip/Sprocket Remover
    Park Tool Team Race Stand - PRS-20
    Park Tool Shop Screwdriver Set - DS-SET
    Park Tool P-Handled Hex Wrench Set with Holder - 8pc
    Park Tool Chain Gang Chain Cleaning System - CG-2 (have had this and loved it, until my kids knocked it off the shelf and it broke).

    I also plan to find a cassette removal tool (they don't sell the Campagnolo one at RealCyclist) and the KMC Missing Link so that I can remove the chain without the uber expensive Campagnolo chain tool (I'd love thoughts and opinion on this). I also need to find the bits/ends for the torque wrench (I don't think it comes with any).

    I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions. Is there anything else I am going to need? I know eventually I will need cable removal tools and bottom bracket/crank tools, but that should be a while off because I just had this bike built in October. I will buy those as needed.

    Oh yeah, and I have container of Simple Green in some spray bottles for cleaning.

    Thanks in advance for your feedback. I have a space in the garage dedicated for this, and I want to keep everything together in one place.

    I'd love thoughts on the stand too. I was originally looking at the various clamp models, but I worry about clamping my top tube and don't like the way the bike "hangs" when clamping the seat post.

    Dan

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I just added:

    Park Tool Socket and Bit Set - SBS-1
    Park Tool Master Link Plier - MLP-1C

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    pass on the link pliers. if you are going to get the import park socket set i would skip the middle man and go to harbor freight. husky pro or craftsman pro screwdrivers are good, park 4.2 master chain tool and the peening tool do work. the 4.2 seems to break pins a lot. way more than my ct3 which i have ground down a few times due to mushrooming. i would grab a spoke wrench too. pass on park cable cutters

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Go to Sears or Home Depot and buy a big set of tools with all the wrenches and screwdrivers you think you will ever need. You'll save a lot of time and money in the long run. Both places warranty their tools for life IIRC. I have a toolchest full of Snap-on and it's really no better.
    Sears has lots of torque wrenches, though you may have to order the one you want. The tool guys have a very extensive catalog you can look at. And if you break Craftsman stuff it's usually an over the counter replacement with minimal fuss.
    Don't waste money on Park hex wrenches/combo wrenches, ratchets, sockets etc when the ones from your local hardware store are as good or better.
    Lezyne makes an 11 speed chain tool, and I think KMC makes an 11 speed chain that has a removable link.
    Last edited by Cinelli 82220; 01-29-2012 at 02:55 PM.

  5. #5
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    I like the Park master link pliers for KMC master links. When new they can be pretty stiff to undo.

    +1 on the Craftsman tools. They're quite nice for home use.

    For torque wrenches, an inexpensive beam type is what you want. The click type ones aren't accurate when they are cheap, and take longer to set up because you have to wind the handle up to the specific torque. They're good for doing up a bunch of bolts on a cylinder head or wheel lug nuts but for a single fastener the beam type works better.

    For bicycle use you need two torque wrenches- large and small. Park's small one is a decent price, but for the large wrench a Harbor Freight one will be good enough and significantly cheaper.

  6. #6
    mtnroadie
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    I like Kobalt Tools, for Non-Park stuff.

    I have a Craftsman Digitorque, ironically i have had numerous bike mechanics recommend a non bike torque wrench, as they are more accurate?

  7. #7
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    I have a ton of Craftsman and Snap On tools...I guess I could go buy more Craftsman.

    I want to have everything I need for the bike in it's own area, and easy to grab and go if I want to take it with me.

    I'll do a price check on Craftsman vs. Park Tools. I agree that the beam type torque wrench is far superior to the click type. That's what I have in my shopping cart...the beam type.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclin Dan View Post
    So, after too many bad experiences with too many shops I have decided to take 95% of my bike wrenching in house. I am mechanically inclined, and am comfortable doing most things already. I'm not afraid to tackle anything with a good set of instructions.

    A little information about my bike. I currently ride a Specialized Tarmac S-Works SL3. I have the full Campagnolo SR11 groupset. I have a few wheel sets, but spend most my time with Mavic Cosmic Carbone SL's with PowerTap.

    Here's what I have in my shopping cart at RealCyclist.com so far.

    Park Tool Torque Wrench - TW-2 (3/8in drive)
    Park Tool Chain Checker - CC-2
    Park Tool 11-Speed Compatible ChainWhip/Sprocket Remover
    Park Tool Team Race Stand - PRS-20
    Park Tool Shop Screwdriver Set - DS-SET
    Park Tool P-Handled Hex Wrench Set with Holder - 8pc
    Park Tool Chain Gang Chain Cleaning System - CG-2 (have had this and loved it, until my kids knocked it off the shelf and it broke).

    I also plan to find a cassette removal tool (they don't sell the Campagnolo one at RealCyclist) and the KMC Missing Link so that I can remove the chain without the uber expensive Campagnolo chain tool (I'd love thoughts and opinion on this). I also need to find the bits/ends for the torque wrench (I don't think it comes with any).

    I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions. Is there anything else I am going to need? I know eventually I will need cable removal tools and bottom bracket/crank tools, but that should be a while off because I just had this bike built in October. I will buy those as needed.

    Oh yeah, and I have container of Simple Green in some spray bottles for cleaning.

    Thanks in advance for your feedback. I have a space in the garage dedicated for this, and I want to keep everything together in one place.

    I'd love thoughts on the stand too. I was originally looking at the various clamp models, but I worry about clamping my top tube and don't like the way the bike "hangs" when clamping the seat post.

    Dan
    Lose the chain checker. Those things really don't work and certainly don't give you any information you can't get with a ruler.

  9. #9
    Militant commuter
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    What about bottom bracket tools? What sort of BB are you running -- external Ultratorque cups or one of the pressfit BBs?

    I like the Park master link pliers, and agree with Kerry's suggestion to drop the useless chain checker. Get a machinist's ruler and you'll be a lot better off.

    One other thing you may consider is a set of thread-pitch gauges. I find them indispensible for a variety of bike tasks, especially when I'm trying to resurrect older frames and components.
    "Luminous beings are we...not this crude matter!"

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverStar View Post
    What about bottom bracket tools? What sort of BB are you running -- external Ultratorque cups or one of the pressfit BBs?

    I like the Park master link pliers, and agree with Kerry's suggestion to drop the useless chain checker. Get a machinist's ruler and you'll be a lot better off.

    One other thing you may consider is a set of thread-pitch gauges. I find them indispensible for a variety of bike tasks, especially when I'm trying to resurrect older frames and components.
    I run the SR11 Ultra Torque crank, and the frame has an OSBB. I use the Specialized supplied delrin cups, then the Campagnolo 68x42 press fit cups.

    The bottom bracket is something that is still a little intimidating to me, just because I've never gotten in there on my own. I guess it isn't a bad idea to get in there and clean/lube everything periodically, right?

    I've always just had the LBS do whatever they said it needed, whenever it needed it. I don't ride this bike in the rain. How often should I pull the BB apart? Also, what tools do I need to do so?

    Thanks so much guys!

  11. #11
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    Really useful !

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