Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 40 of 40
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,703
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I have Shimano and shift a lot because of where I live and have found that around 5000 they are almost certainly starting to fray and around 3500 is the earliest I've had one fray. They seem to fray sooner the older the shifter is. That could be a coincidence though.
    2000 miles here and that was on a new Ultegra 6800 shifter. I even know someone who routinely chews her rear shifter cable at 1500 miles. This seems to be an issue with the last two generations of Shimano STI shifters (ones with under the tape routing).

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Don't learn the hard way like I did. Pieces of frayed cables can be a royal pain to deal with once they've worked their way all over the shifters internals and even with tweezers you could miss some and ruin the shifter.
    Decent cables don't cost much and replacing them is a lay-up once you've done it a couple times.
    Replacing cables isn't that easy now with internal (inside the downtube) routing. Yes, I know there is a trick to it, but I haven't learned it yet. I watched my shop do it and it even took them 2 hours - that's a trained hand that does this all the time! That's why I will never buy another bike with internally routed cables again. Externally routed cable replacement is a breeze!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  2. #27
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    11,965
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    2000 miles here and that was on a new Ultegra 6800 shifter. I even know someone who routinely chews her rear shifter cable at 1500 miles. This seems to be an issue with the last two generations of Shimano STI shifters (ones with under the tape routing).



    Replacing cables isn't that easy now with internal (inside the downtube) routing. Yes, I know there is a trick to it, but I haven't learned it yet. I watched my shop do it and it even took them 2 hours - that's a trained hand that does this all the time! That's why I will never buy another bike with internally routed cables again. Externally routed cable replacement is a breeze!
    It's easy on almost every internally routed frame. Any mechanic that takes 2 hours to run a couple of shift cables and housing needs to find another career. You either run a liner up the old cable before removing it, or if that's not an option you can use the Park kit w/ the magnets. Hardly takes any longer than a frame w/ external stops.

    ETA: What frame were you working with? I might have some tips for you...
    Last edited by cxwrench; 06-10-2017 at 09:00 AM.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  3. #28
    Pathlete and Pedalphile
    Reputation: redondoaveb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,921
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It's easy on almost every internally routed frame. Any mechanic that takes 2 hours to run a couple of shift cables and housing needs to find another career. You either run a liner up the old cable before removing it, or if that's not an option you can use the Park kit w/ the magnets. Hardly takes any longer than a frame w/ external stops.
    +1 When I do mine I attach a pull string on to the housing I'm pulling out and then tie the pull line on to the new housing I'm pulling in. Pull the pull line out, cable housing comes with it. Easy peasy.
    If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,939
    ^ Yeah, really, 2 hours by a mechanic? Unless that was a typo for 2 minutes maybe...?
    I'm just a D-I-wire and it took me 20 minutes to replace internally routed derailleur cable. I used the cable straw (or whatever that's called) that came with the frame by putting the damaged cable to its end, then pulled it out gently which allows the guide straw to take the cable's place. Then put the new cable trough the guide straw and voila, it's done.

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,703
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    It's easy on almost every internally routed frame. Any mechanic that takes 2 hours to run a couple of shift cables and housing needs to find another career. You either run a liner up the old cable before removing it, or if that's not an option you can use the Park kit w/ the magnets. Hardly takes any longer than a frame w/ external stops.

    ETA: What frame were you working with? I might have some tips for you...
    I have a 2014 Cannondale Synapse Carbon. Any tips are appreciated.

    Cables are bare inside the downtube if I'm not mistaken.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  6. #31
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I have a 2014 Cannondale Synapse Carbon. Any tips are appreciated.

    Cables are bare inside the downtube if I'm not mistaken.
    The technique bvber describes is also the one I use. To break it down:

    1. Detach the RD cable and remove the last little section of housing at the back of the bike.

    2. From the back, run the straw over the bare RD cable and into the frame. The straw can be pushed over the bare RD cable all the way through the frame until it exits at the front.

    3. You can now pull the cable wire out of the frame, leaving the straw in place.

    4. Measure and cut your new RD housing for both the front and the rear.

    5. Run the cable through the shifter and through the front housing, then run the cable through the straw and out the back.

    6. Remove the straw while leaving the cable in place.

    7. Add the rear housing.

    Repeat with the FD cable (it's even simpler).

    I'm a total amateur mechanic, but in my experience this takes the same time as external cables since the time I lose in worrying about the straw I get back in not having to worry about cable stops on the outside of the frame.

    And if your LBS really takes 2 hours to do this, I'd suggest looking for a different LBS.

  7. #32
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,703
    Quote Originally Posted by fronesis View Post
    The technique bvber describes is also the one I use. To break it down:

    1. Detach the RD cable and remove the last little section of housing at the back of the bike.

    2. From the back, run the straw over the bare RD cable and into the frame. The straw can be pushed over the bare RD cable all the way through the frame until it exits at the front.

    3. You can now pull the cable wire out of the frame, leaving the straw in place.

    4. Measure and cut your new RD housing for both the front and the rear.

    5. Run the cable through the shifter and through the front housing, then run the cable through the straw and out the back.

    6. Remove the straw while leaving the cable in place.

    7. Add the rear housing.

    Repeat with the FD cable (it's even simpler).

    I'm a total amateur mechanic, but in my experience this takes the same time as external cables since the time I lose in worrying about the straw I get back in not having to worry about cable stops on the outside of the frame.

    And if your LBS really takes 2 hours to do this, I'd suggest looking for a different LBS.
    Thanks. Where can I get this "straw"? That sounds more like a sheath.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  8. #33
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    11,965
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Thanks. Where can I get this "straw"? That sounds more like a sheath.
    This is exactly what I do for most frames. Pretty sure it will work w/ you C-dale. You can get the liners at any bike shop. I have tons in a drawer. Different diameters, different lengths.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  9. #34
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,703
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    This is exactly what I do for most frames. Pretty sure it will work w/ you C-dale. You can get the liners at any bike shop. I have tons in a drawer. Different diameters, different lengths.
    Is this worth investing in?

    IR-1 Internal Cable Routing Kit | Park Tool
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  10. #35
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    11,965
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    That's one of the best things that Park has released in years. I have used it enough that we're on our third one at the shop. I have never really gotten into the habit of using the big magnets to draw the small ones through a frame, not many are smooth enough inside so that works reliably. If you're doing internal cables more than just a few times a year it could come in handy. Also works for pulling housing through w/ the tapered/threaded end on one of the wires. Magnets, the threaded end, and the rubber 'cup' end for Di2 wires. Good kit to have, especially if you have to deal w/ a frame that has no liners or old cables to use.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  11. #36
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Thanks. Where can I get this "straw"? That sounds more like a sheath.
    This is what I use: https://www.amazon.com/Jagwire-Black...=Jagwire+liner

    Also, that Park Tool cable routing kit is totally worth the money but make sure you get the new one with the Di2 bits - very handy. And Di2 routing IS a bit tricky because you can't do what I described above.

  12. #37
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,703
    Thanks guys! In all fairness, some of that 2 hours the shop spent was finding the problem. The shifting was cr@ppy and I did not yet know why. There was also the time they spent looking for and picking all the wire fragments out of the shifter. It was badly frayed and would have broken on the next ride. I offered them extra $$ for their time and they would not accept.

    This happened at 2000 miles. Since I don't really enjoy looking for and picking tiny wire fragments out of my shifter (my close-up eyesight sucks), I think every 1500 miles for the rear cable would be a good preventive maintenance program. That's twice a year for me.

    Fron, I have mechanical Ultegra 6800, not Di2.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  13. #38
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Thanks guys! In all fairness, some of that 2 hours the shop spent was finding the problem.
    Ah, now THIS I HAVE spent many hours working on in frustration. Sometimes it's hard to diagnose, especially if you don't know to look for the frayed/exploded cable inside the shifter.

    Fron, I have mechanical Ultegra 6800, not Di2.
    Yes, I realize you are dealing with mechanical now, just meant to say: A) if you ever upgrade to Di2 in the future, the routing there is more complex (but it should only have to be done once) and therefore B) if you are buying the Park Tool routing kit, might as well have the NEWER one with the Di2 bits - just to have in your toolkit.

  14. #39
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,939
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Thanks guys! In all fairness, some of that 2 hours the shop spent was finding the problem. The shifting was cr@ppy and I did not yet know why. There was also the time they spent looking for and picking all the wire fragments out of the shifter. It was badly frayed and would have broken on the next ride.
    When diagnosing the problem, don't they go through Q & A session? "Not shifting properly? Hmm..., have you replaced the cable recently? And there it is. 2 minutes.

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,703
    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    When diagnosing the problem, don't they go through Q & A session? "Not shifting properly? Hmm..., have you replaced the cable recently? And there it is. 2 minutes.
    The whole groupset was installed only 2000 miles and 6 months before this happened.

    What is strange is that not everybody has this problem with their newer Shimano shifters.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-09-2014, 07:54 AM
  2. Rear Derailleur Adjustment
    By Powder Hound in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-28-2005, 11:09 AM
  3. Rear derailleur adjustment
    By dcp in forum Trek
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-08-2005, 12:41 PM
  4. Rear derailleur adjustment for chain rattle in big gears
    By nate in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-13-2004, 04:23 PM
  5. Rear derailleur adjustment for chain rattle in big gears
    By nate in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-13-2004, 04:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •