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  1. #51
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    Sit bone measuring is marketing. None of us sit on our sit bones - we sit on the narrower ischium.
    You mean ischial tuberosities? People call it "sit bone" for short in cycling communities. Which part of it bears weight depends on the rider's position. Some ride more upright, some others more bent. I have narrower sit bone width than average for my frame size and the saddles made for medium to wide sit bone width gave me all sorts of discomfort. When I switched to a narrower version of the same model, it felt much better.

    The saddles the OP has tried so far are mostly curved from left to right, putting the sit bones on angled surfaces. Try a saddle with a flatter rear surface.
    So, we do sit on our sit bones? Name:  scratch-basso87c9d.gif
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  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    You mean ischial tuberosities? People call it "sit bone" for short in cycling communities. Which part of it bears weight depends on the rider's position. Some ride more upright, some others more bent. I have narrower sit bone width than average for my frame size and the saddles made for medium to wide sit bone width gave me all sorts of discomfort. When I switched to a narrower version of the same model, it felt much better.


    So, we do sit on our sit bones? Name:  scratch-basso87c9d.gif
Views: 86
Size:  418 Bytes
    We don't sit on the ischial tuberosities, we sit on the ischium or ischial ramus. You sit on the tuberosities when you sit upright in a chair, not when leaning forward on a bike.

    "Sit bones" are also short hand for the entire section of arched bones that run from the tuberosities to the pubis where they meet.


    Measuring the tuberosities, which you don't sit on, and then comparing that to an arbitrary number like outer saddle width is like measuring the width of your ankles and then using that number to select shoes by measuring the width of the outer sole. You might create a formula that is close for a certain brand of shoe, but that's all.

    The actual width of the two pelvic contact points each cyclist uses is going to be based on the shape of their pelvic bones and their pelvic tilt in riding position. There is no way of predicting that with any accuracy.

    We have many riders whose measured tuberosity width is greater than the total saddle width, yet are sitting on their "sit bones" in great comfort, and that's because the bones they are actually sitting on are much narrower.

    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  3. #53
    LongviewTx
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    Based upon the pain description and my experience, the saddle is too wide. Plus, as tohers have advised, your normal placement configuration on the saddle.

    Have you tried a narrower saddle (or is the one that produced your pain description already narrow?)

    My experience, narrower saddle, move back onto that saddle and wear a tight, thin material underwear base (I use an Adidas product that is one size undersized) so that there exists some movement between layers. Kind of like bursa sacks due for muscle interface points...

    My 2 bits, but hey, it is the interweb...

    Sincerely, Good luck with the finding the solution.

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