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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Sealed cartridge bearing removal/replacement question

    I have a freehub body from an older Reynolds wheel that has two sealed cartridge bearings inside of it. The bearings inside the freehub body (not the axle) are getting very rough so I'd like to replace them. When I inquired, I got the following advice and instructions from Reynolds customer service:

    It is a much older style KT hub that is a bit different from what we currently use. We no longer have freehub bodies for those hubs but the bearings are replaceable. There are two bearings inside the freehub body which are 15268 bearings.

    Removing the bearings currently in the hub is a pretty simple process. If you look through the freehub body with the pawls closest to you, you’ll see the inner race of the inboard bearing. Both of the bearings will need to be pushed out the other side. I would find a socket or punch that you can use to push these bearings out of the driveside. There is also a small spacer that goes between the two bearings. Once removed you’ll need to push the new bearings in. I would recommend using a socket that fits the outside race of the bearing when you’re pushing them back in. I hope this points in you in the correct direction....
    The bearings are readily available, and totally understand these instructions, can see that there are two bearings with a spacer, etc. But I just want to know if there's any "gotchas" I am not seeing in these instructions - like what am I going to ruin if I knock out the bearings. The hub is rideable the way it is, and I'd rather just ride with scratchy bearings in the freehub body than need to buy a new hub and rebuild the wheels at this point in time.

    I've set headsets, crown races, and other things unrelated to bikes that require even pressure and sensible feeling for the amount of force need, so I get that - even and easy force - but I'm wondering if it's worthwhile buying a bearing press and/or bearing extractor as they're pretty cheap. But that would delay the project, thwarting momentum because I'd have to order it (I think).


    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by Camilo; 06-06-2017 at 04:51 PM.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    If Reynolds recommends using a socket to drive the bearings in and out, then that's all you need. No presses or extractors needed.

    The key is to find a socket which contacts the O.D. of the bearing. If it contacts the seal or the I.D., it will damage the bearing being installed. Obviously, you don't care about the bearing being removed.

    With the replacement bearings, be sure to grease the bearing bore AND the bearing surface before installation.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    You may find an extractor worthwhile, however as for the press you may be able to make your own using an old axle, large washers/nuts and the removed sealed bearings nearest to the hub.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    If Reynolds recommends using a socket to drive the bearings in and out, then that's all you need. No presses or extractors needed.

    The key is to find a socket which contacts the O.D. of the bearing. If it contacts the seal or the I.D., it will damage the bearing being installed. Obviously, you don't care about the bearing being removed.

    With the replacement bearings, be sure to grease the bearing bore AND the bearing surface before installation.
    This, or if you don't have a socket that exactly fits the outside race, you can in a pinch, use a thick washer (or a couple) from the hardware store that are the exact size you need. That and a slightly smaller socket has worked for me on a few occasions and have not needed to take the wheel or bike to the LBS to have the bearings replaced. Just make sure when you are pressing or tapping out or in the bearings you drive them square and not at an angle. If you don't press them out/in straight, they can get stuck and/or possibly malform the freehub body - especially if it is aluminum.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the advice. I'll probably give it a try. I'm working on another project which will allow me to be without this wheel should it not work out for any reason.

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