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  1. #1
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    Shimano Cable Fuzz/Hair

    All,

    I searched for this, but couldn't find a thread about it. There didn't seem to be much discussion on google either.

    So I am building a new bike with Duraace 9100 Mechanical, so figured I would opt for the Shimano Duraace cable set. Shimano SP41 housing, and PTFE cables.

    After ASM of the cables/housing, I had to remove the cables on front and rear derauiler to cut the housing shorter on one.

    When I removed the cables, both of them in random spots had white fuzz, hair like strands. I searched around the internets, and best I could find is this is the cable coating, but "Does not affect" shifting or braking performance.

    How can it not? It's increasing the surface area of the cable, which means more friction, generally.

    Thoughts and experience?

  2. #2
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    Shimano is obviously going to say 'no problem' because it happens no matter how careful you are. I'm more or less in agreement w/ you, it has to have some effect on shifting, but it doesn't seem like much in the all the bikes I've used those cables on.
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  3. #3
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    To minimize (but not eliminate this effect) you need to use the special ferrules with the thin tube lead in. If you use regular ferrules the cable runs by the sharp edge and causes the fuzz. Other than that, it still happens, but not a lot usually.

    Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    Did some more research on this.

    Apparently the ones that fuzz are the Shimano Polymer cables, which are different than their PTFE or regular line.

    People claim that the fuzz doesn't affect performance but it's hard for it not to. Also, people claim you have to be very careful during the ASM process, and only ASM the cables once, or they will fuzz.

    Also, as noted above you are suppose special ferrules supplied, BUT a lot of frames like mine (Scott Foil) provide their own ferrules into the frame, where the cables go directly into the plastic supplied, and you can not use their speciali shimano ferruls.

    I guess we will see? Anyone have any negative experiences with these Polymer DuraACE cables?

    If the cables are fuzzy are they toast?
    Thanks

  5. #5
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    There's always some fuzziness, but I've never noticed a change in performance. As in any cable, changing cables and housings on a regular basis is important. If you want to add a picture, we can provide better judgement.

    Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    From my own experience, I have found that the Shimano rear shifter will chew the cable well before any hair (PTFE coating) will cause any problems with shifting.
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  7. #7
    Steaming piles of opinion
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    My take is that the fuzz is the PTFE (or similar) coating from the valleys between the individual strands "peeling" with the first bit of being worked with that the cable has seen since its manufacture. Whatever method they use to apply it, would wipe a minimal coating on the outermost surfaces, but the spaces between the strands would have a build depth that would reasonably come loose a bit as the cable are messed with. Harmless at worst, and very possibly helpful over time as the cables rub in the housings and take off some of the main surface's material.
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  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indyxc View Post
    If the cables are fuzzy are they toast?
    Thanks
    No, they are fine. The polymer cables have 2 coatings over the stainless steel. The first is quite hard, solid, and durable. The 2nd outer one that causes fuzz is actually a wrap of thin polymer thread, apparently NOT reliably fixed or glued. If you look at it funny it breaks and fuzzes locally.
    I scrape it off the shifter and rear mech loop areas, then go ride. It's sort of like an appendix, not really needed.

    Not sure what they were thinking on that one.
    The first hard coating underneath on the polymer cables is very good and low friction, and btw substantially different (better IMHO) than the previous Shimano PTFE cables.

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