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  1. #1
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    Sugino Autex self extracting crank bolts

    I found a bike that I am trying to convert into a single speed commuter.

    I was trying to remove the cranks and saw something I wasn't used to. The crank bolts were sugino autex self exracting crank bolts. I did a little research and seems like they were used for touring so that you didnt have to bring a crank puller with you while riding.

    Anyways I didnt have the proper key to remove them 'correctly' and with them being a little seized to begin with I kind of stripped the cap and the bolt while trying to get them off. They are still usable but I dont want to have the same problem next time I take the cranks off. I am not familiar with normal crank bolts either and I want to replace it either with self extracting bolts or normal bolts that need a crank puller. The cranks are sugino AT and the bb is a traditional square taper.

    Im not sure what other information you need, if there is any ask and I can try and get the info to you. I included a picture of the bb and also a link to the autex crank bolts

    Sugino Autex self extracting crank bolts-img00115-20110214-1330.jpg

    Sugino Autex self extracting crank bolts-img00116-20110214-1334.jpg

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    First off, how is the bb? Does it spin smoothly without any binding or grittiness, does it feel dry or is there any play in it? The reason I ask this is because it looks like the original setup on this bike. So depending on the mileage on it, perhaps it would be wise to consider a complete drive train upgrade.

    However if you find that it is acceptable for your purposes, then most cranks of that era used either a 14 or 15m hex bolt. Use that in place of the self extracting bolt & cap. Just make sure that the thread pitch is the same. Its probably easiest & cheapest just to go to a lbs & get one there.

  3. #3
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    What do you mean "kind of stripped"? What did you damage? If you only damaged the cap, you're fine. As long as the threads on the inside of the crankarm are intact, you can just use a regular crank puller to remove the crank next time. As long as the bolt is not stripped, you can still use it. If you stripped the head of the bolt (where the hex wrench goes) you should get a new bolt so you won't have trouble removing it next time.

    If you did strip the crank threads, you'll have a lot of trouble removing the crank arm in the future.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia
    What do you mean "kind of stripped"? What did you damage? If you only damaged the cap, you're fine. As long as the threads on the inside of the crankarm are intact, you can just use a regular crank puller to remove the crank next time. As long as the bolt is not stripped, you can still use it. If you stripped the head of the bolt (where the hex wrench goes) you should get a new bolt so you won't have trouble removing it next time.

    If you did strip the crank threads, you'll have a lot of trouble removing the crank arm in the future.

    JCavilia thanks for the response. I did not strip the threads I stripped the head when my hand slipped trying to get it out the wrench came out at and angle and striped the head in one corner. Do you happen to know what size bolt this is or what type of threads are normal? also the bolt has almost like a built in washer, is this specific to crank bolts?

  5. #5
    m_s
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    Yes, crank bolts have a rubber backing. Like someone said, the bolt you need could be a couple different sizes. Just take your crank in to a shop and have them find the right bolt. Way easier than trying to order something.

  6. #6
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by russelr
    also the bolt has almost like a built in washer, is this specific to crank bolts?
    Crank bolt threads and crank eye threads are all the same, no real need to know what they are. I'm thinking that you're not visualizing how this self-extracting business works, so here's a primer on these things. Sugino, Shimano, doesn't matter. They all work the same way. Apologize if it's too basic:

    1. A self-extracting crank bolt has an integral and relatively thick ring set back a few millimeters from the head. (It's called a washer sometimes, but it's really not). When you back such a bolt out, the shoulder marked with an orange arrow pushes against the back of the extractor cap (on your bike, that extractor cap is marked with "Sugino Autex"). At that point, you'll feel a lot of resistance, even though you're backing the bolt out. If you continue to back the bolt out against that resistance, it will eventually push the crank off the spindle.

    2. A standard crank bolt doesn't have such an integral and relatively thick ring, although it may look like that. Often (like the one in the photo), it has an integral washer and a rubber dust cap. As you can see, there's no recess for an extractor cap to go. To remove the crank, you completely remove this bolt first. Then you thread a crank puller into the pedal eye and remove the crank with that crank puller.

    3. Just because you have a self-extracting bolt doesn't mean you have to use that self-extracting feature. To treat a self-extracting bolt like a standard bolt, remove the extractor cap first by spinning it off with a pair of needle nose pliers or a pin spanner. Once that extractor cap is off, remove the bolt completely. Then pull the crank off with a crank puller. This would be my course of action if I were you. (Read up on how to use a crank puller though. It's not rocket surgery, but you can really screw up a crank if you're just guessing on how to use such a puller.)

    Note: bolts are not shown to scale. Both have the exact same thread diameter and pitch.

    .
    Last edited by wim; 02-15-2011 at 05:55 AM.

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