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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Super compact road chainrings

    Who is interested in Sub-Compact chainrings?

    That is to say, front, double ring gearing that is actually designed for the physical abilities and riding styles of normal people, rather than professional road racers...

    Asking for a freind.

  2. #2
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    There's a whole thread on this in the 50+ forum here:
    https://www.bikeforums.net/fifty-plu...road-bike.html

    Seems 46/30 is the crank of choice. Makes a lot of sense, just some of the solutions are very expensive.

  3. #3
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    My ex has early onset arthritis and would have pain for days if she pushed too hard. I built her a bike with a 46/32 cross crank in the front and a 14-28 junior cassette. Shifted smooth and she could grind up anything.
    That's the longest I've ever ridden without a beer stop.

  4. #4
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    I currently use a Shimano-6800 compact 50/34 with a 11/32 cassette and have questionable skills for climbing long and or steep hills. With my old triple, I had a bail out gear that allowed me to crawl and recover on steep or long hills, I lost that with the new group set/bike. I would like to try a sub-compact crankset either 48/32 or 46/30 as I do not want to stop or get off the bike and my current low gear is close to matching my skill set.. There are three reasonable alternatives, buy aftermarket chain rings, buy a complete crankset and/or go to a larger mountain bike cassette. I dislike the larger cassette option and am leaning towards the 48/32 rings. I would appreciate any input from others I also believe the 48/32 will help fill in the gaps currently experienced with the gear spacing. Hopefully the smaller crankset will help with some of the Pittsburgh-Cranberry hills.

  5. #5
    JSR
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    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post
    I currently use a Shimano-6800 compact 50/34 with a 11/32 cassette and have questionable skills for climbing long and or steep hills. With my old triple, I had a bail out gear that allowed me to crawl and recover on steep or long hills, I lost that with the new group set/bike. I would like to try a sub-compact crankset either 48/32 or 46/30 as I do not want to stop or get off the bike and my current low gear is close to matching my skill set.. There are three reasonable alternatives, buy aftermarket chain rings, buy a complete crankset and/or go to a larger mountain bike cassette. I dislike the larger cassette option and am leaning towards the 48/32 rings. I would appreciate any input from others I also believe the 48/32 will help fill in the gaps currently experienced with the gear spacing. Hopefully the smaller crankset will help with some of the Pittsburgh-Cranberry hills.
    Another alternative is going to a cassette with 34 and an Ultegra 8000 mid-cage RD. It doesn’t necessarily address all your concerns, but I suggest it in the interest of completeness,

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