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  1. #1
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    Is there a right direction to install a (Shimano) front wheel?

    I usually install it so that the writings on the hub are not upside down when seated on the bike, but does it matters at all? I'm thinking it does not since everything seems symmetrical and my tires don't have directional thread patterns. Can the cones adjustment or locknuts be affected in any way?

  2. #2
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    No
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  3. #3
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    Usually, the quick release lever goes on the non-drive side...the side opposite the chain.
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    Quote Originally Posted by old_fuji View Post
    Usually, the quick release lever goes on the non-drive side...the side opposite the chain.
    Yeah I always put it there. Just realised that the rest of the wheel has been rotated for a little while, didn't seem to have any effect but I wanted to make sure.

  5. #5
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToiletSiphon View Post
    I'm thinking it does not since everything seems symmetrical
    No it does not matter. The bearings work the same in both directions.
    Being symmetrical would be the only issue. If the rim is slightly off center then flipping the wheel would make your brake pads not even.
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  6. #6
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    I like to match the label orientation on the front and rear hubs, OCD.

  7. #7
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    The only thing that plays here is aesthetics and convention, nothing more. From that stand point:

    1) QR's are always on the non-drive side.

    2) The hub labels should be right side up while standing on the bike.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  8. #8
    JSR
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    The other day I helped a young lady prep her bike for a big ride. I put her front wheel on backwards. Her speedo didn't work. My cheeks were pink.

    Put the skewer on the left.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSR View Post
    The other day I helped a young lady prep her bike for a big ride. I put her front wheel on backwards. Her speedo didn't work. My cheeks were pink.

    Put the skewer on the left.
    I was wondering what the hell her wheel had to do with her swimsuit... Then I got it!

    I had never put the wheel backwards when I had a magnet. But now I use Garmin speed sensor and attach it to the back wheel, so it's not a good reminder anymore.

  10. #10
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    Gee....I've always put my front QR on the right side. Just looks better that way...

    But, if you have directional tires, the chevrons on the tire tread are supposed to be pointing forward.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Gee....I've always put my front QR on the right side. Just looks better that way...
    people photograph bikes from the drive side.... looks cleaner without the quick release.


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  12. #12
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    Back in the day when everyone rode box rims, the rims would often have a sticker on them, so that when you built a front wheel, the hub label and the rim label had to go in the same direction The QR always went on the left.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    people photograph bikes from the drive side.... looks cleaner without the quick release.


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    Well, I'm right-handed, and it's just easier for me that way-hold the bike with the left hand while I tighten it.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Gee....I've always put my front QR on the right side. Just looks better that way...
    i place the front skewer lever on the drive-side. i just like seeing one skewer lever (front) and one skewer nut (rear) from the drive-side. rim labels always face the drive side. hub labels are right side up when looking down on them. tire labels are always centered over the valve stem, drive-side.

    and some tires are directional.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Well, I'm right-handed, and it's just easier for me that way-hold the bike with the left hand while I tighten it.
    I'm right-handed as well, it's no problem to have the QR on the left side.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    I'm right-handed as well, it's no problem to have the QR on the left side.
    Well, here's the deal:

    I take my bike (sans front wheel) off my Yakima rack, fit the front wheel on the ground, holding the bike from the non-drive side (to keep from getting chain marks on my leg), and bend over the bike to tighten the QR lever. If the lever were on the left side, I'd have to either tighten it with my left hand, or else hold the bike away from myself while tightening the lever, making it difficult to keep the wheel aligned in the fork while tightening. So the lever stays on the drive side for me.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    Well, here's the deal:

    I take my bike (sans front wheel) off my Yakima rack, fit the front wheel on the ground, holding the bike from the non-drive side (to keep from getting chain marks on my leg), and bend over the bike to tighten the QR lever. If the lever were on the left side, I'd have to either tighten it with my left hand, or else hold the bike away from myself while tightening the lever, making it difficult to keep the wheel aligned in the fork while tightening. So the lever stays on the drive side for me.
    Bizarre. You shouldn't have to align the front wheel in the fork - it should be centered in the fork with the bike sitting on the ground and the QR open. You either have a bent fork or a dished front wheel.

    And yes, somehow virtually the entire rest of the world has figured out how to easily tighten the front QR when it is on the left side of the bike.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    ... making it difficult to keep the wheel aligned in the fork while tightening...
    is your fork out of alignment?
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  19. #19
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    Another question regarding my Shimano front wheel.

    I left just a little play when adjusting the hub preload (backed off 1/32 turn when cones made contact with bearings) When mounted on the bike with almost no QR pressure, I can feel the play by moving the rim side to side, which gives a slight knocking sensation. When I fully close the QR, I can't feel the knocking anymore. But if I seat on the bike and do the same test, there's a very small knock that can be felt when the rim is in certain positions. I guess that means I still have too much play, even if the "classic" test is conclusive?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToiletSiphon View Post
    Another question regarding my Shimano front wheel.

    I left just a little play when adjusting the hub preload (backed off 1/32 turn when cones made contact with bearings) When mounted on the bike with almost no QR pressure, I can feel the play by moving the rim side to side, which gives a slight knocking sensation. When I fully close the QR, I can't feel the knocking anymore. But if I seat on the bike and do the same test, there's a very small knock that can be felt when the rim is in certain positions. I guess that means I still have too much play, even if the "classic" test is conclusive?
    i don't do a "seated" test.

    if there's no play with the skewer tightened normally (not overtightened) while i'm off the bike, i'd call it good. i like a little play when wheel is mounted and skewer is loose (before tightening).
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    i don't do a "seated" test.

    if there's no play with the skewer tightened normally (not overtightened) while i'm off the bike, i'd call it good. i like a little play when wheel is mounted and skewer is loose (before tightening).
    I know it's not very usual. But I tought I felt a very very faint knocking sensation out of the bike in some rim positions, but wasn't sure. It occurred to me that what really mattered is how the hub behaves when the bike is actually in use, so I tried this test. Knocking is more perceptible, but still pretty faint.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToiletSiphon View Post
    Another question regarding my Shimano front wheel.

    I left just a little play when adjusting the hub preload (backed off 1/32 turn when cones made contact with bearings) When mounted on the bike with almost no QR pressure, I can feel the play by moving the rim side to side, which gives a slight knocking sensation. When I fully close the QR, I can't feel the knocking anymore. But if I seat on the bike and do the same test, there's a very small knock that can be felt when the rim is in certain positions. I guess that means I still have too much play, even if the "classic" test is conclusive?
    There should be just a bit of play before tightening the QR. That should go away when tightened and you should not feel it while riding. If you do, you are still too loose.

    All this trial and error preload adjustment is now no longer necessary with the Ultegra 6800 or Dura Ace 9000 hubs.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    There should be just a bit of play before tightening the QR. That should go away when tightened and you should not feel it while riding. If you do, you are still too loose.

    All this trial and error preload adjustment is now no longer necessary with the Ultegra 6800 or Dura Ace 9000 hubs.
    My hub is a RS81, so same as Ultegra and Dura Ace. From my limited experience, it's still a bit trial and error... If I leave no play at all when finger tightening, the bearings feel a bit rough when mounted in the bike. Also seems like rear hub is a bit more affected by QR pressure and needs a tad more play than the front hub.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToiletSiphon View Post
    My hub is a RS81, so same as Ultegra and Dura Ace. From my limited experience, it's still a bit trial and error... If I leave no play at all when finger tightening, the bearings feel a bit rough when mounted in the bike. Also seems like rear hub is a bit more affected by QR pressure and needs a tad more play than the front hub.
    Are you sure the RS81 has the current 6800 Ultegra hub? It may be the previous 6700 generation which didn't have that feature.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Are you sure the RS81 has the current 6800 Ultegra hub? It may be the previous 6700 generation which didn't have that feature.
    RS80 was the old generation. RS81 has the digital cone adjustment. No need for wrenches.

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