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Thread: Toe in

  1. #1
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    Toe in

    Any quick rule of thumb for when it comes to dialing in toe in? Currently setting up some new Dura-Ace brakes with Exalith pads. I know they are going to go 'WHIRRRR'.

  2. #2
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    For years, I've set front and back pads slightly toed in - using a credit card to set the gap. A friend of mine - and more importantly, a pro mechanic - told me he's been setting up carbon rims and carbon-specific pads with no toe - just flat to the rim. I set mine up like that (Swiss Stop) and they're working well - great breaking, no chatter.

    Would also like to hear others' recommendations/findings

  3. #3
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    I always used a credit card too. Setting them up once when I didn't have a cc handy so went flat taught me I was wasting my time.

  4. #4
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    Toe in not required. I've never toe'd in road pads. And I run the Exalith pads. They're great.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  5. #5
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    Cool, thanks everyone! All very good suggestions. I'll probably just keep them mostly flat since that appears to be the consensus.

  6. #6
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    I can't remember the last time I set up brake pads any way other than dead flat. I adjust thousands of brakes every year and they're all flat. If they make noise it's pretty much always contamination of some type.
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  7. #7
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    This.....and you will never go back!

    https://www.amazon.com/Tacx-Brake-Sh.../dp/B001D8WLQO

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by adilosnave View Post
    Any quick rule of thumb for when it comes to dialing in toe in? Currently setting up some new Dura-Ace brakes with Exalith pads. I know they are going to go 'WHIRRRR'.
    Back in the day when brakes were a lot more flexible than they are today and pad compounds were not nearly as good, toe-in was standard practice and you sometimes got serious squeal if you didn't. These days, it's generally not an issue and certainly not a requirement for most setups.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    I can't remember the last time I set up brake pads any way other than dead flat. I adjust thousands of brakes every year and they're all flat. If they make noise it's pretty much always contamination of some type.
    Awhile back, I had a bike with a nasty brake pulsation problem. It was a Cannondale hybrid with V-brakes and a Headshok. Tried toeing in, that didn't work. Tried toeing out, that worked for awhile, then the pulsation came back. Changed pads, sanded down brake tracks as much as I could, but there was a wear groove that I couldn't get below. Problem still existed.

    New rims, problem gone!

    I have never had a squealing problem on either of my road bikes and both are adjusted flat. I will say that when I have toed brakes, there was definitely reduced braking power.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  10. #10
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    Shimano still recommends a toe in of 0.5 mm. See page 21.

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  11. #11
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    Leave it to Tacx. That is so clever!!

  12. #12
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    If thousands and thousands of people are setting up their pads flat, which they are, and not having problems it's not needed. It will cause pads to wear faster.
    I work for some bike racers
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by goodboyr View Post
    This.....and you will never go back!

    https://www.amazon.com/Tacx-Brake-Sh.../dp/B001D8WLQO

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    I did not realize there were multiple tools on the market for this. I have always just stuck a think piece of cardboard between one end of the pad and rim.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    If thousands and thousands of people are setting up their pads flat, which they are, and not having problems it's not needed. It will cause pads to wear faster.
    OTOH, you have always argued that if it's in the Shimano specs there must be a reason......just sayin'

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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    If thousands and thousands of people are setting up their pads flat, which they are, and not having problems it's not needed. It will cause pads to wear faster.
    I guess you're not buying that when you brake, the brake arms twist (flex in the brake arms plus play in the pivots) so that the center of pressure is towards the rear of the pad, which means the pad will wear more at the back of the pad. To get uniform wear on the pad, you should toe them in. Maybe road brakes are so stiff that this is a non problem. However, with V's and cantis, which all seem to have play in the pivots in my experience, toe in is necessary.

  16. #16
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    I guess you're not buying that when you brake, the brake arms twist (flex in the brake arms plus play in the pivots) so that the center of pressure is towards the rear of the pad, which means the pad will wear more at the back of the pad. To get uniform wear on the pad, you should toe them in. Maybe road brakes are so stiff that this is a non problem. However, with V's and cantis, which all seem to have play in the pivots in my experience, toe in is necessary.
    Not w/ modern road brakes.
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  17. #17
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by goodboyr View Post
    OTOH, you have always argued that if it's in the Shimano specs there must be a reason......just sayin'

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    Brake pad adjustment is somewhat more generic and less critical than choosing the correct derailleur or using the proper rotor/pads.
    I work for some bike racers
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    and a bunch of skateboards

  18. #18
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    Of.course. Just doing a little trolling.....that's all.


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  19. #19
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by goodboyr View Post
    Of.course. Just doing a little trolling.....that's all.


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    From you I take no offense
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  20. #20
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    Wow I’m shocked. No one uses a dime?
    I keep a dime in my toolbox just to set toe in and my brakes always work great.
    PS - two nickels will NOT work.

  21. #21
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    Flat has worked fine for me. For many, many years.

  22. #22
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    You will find it is flatted after brakes a while and adjust it again if toe in is necessary in your theory. Always flat shoe touch for me.

  23. #23
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    Why does toe in stop a brake from squealing?

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