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  1. #1
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    Using Lube and Loctite?

    I've always used a touch of Park Lube on bolts like stem screws, etc. Should one also put a drop of loctite on those parts as well? The manual call for Loctite 222. I have Loctite 242 so is it wise to use that?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    I don't know what Park Lube is exactly but you should use grease.
    I don't know for a fact but lube AND grease sounds kinda stupid to me.
    Use one or the other.

  3. #3
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDave View Post
    I've always used a touch of Park Lube on bolts like stem screws, etc. Should one also put a drop of loctite on those parts as well? The manual call for Loctite 222. I have Loctite 242 so is it wise to use that?
    Nothing wrong with using lube on screws. But it's not going to last as long as grease.

    No DO NOT use lube/grease and loctite. It'll render the loctite useless.

    Loctite 242 is fine. It's all I use (but I rarely use loctite). It's just one step up in strength from 222. A drop will do you. Don't flood the bolt with it or it may be really hard to loosen.

    Last edited by tlg; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:06 AM.
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  4. #4
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    Well, the park lube/grease to stop creaking; the loctitce to secure the bolt?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDave View Post
    Well, the park lube/grease to stop creaking; the loctitce to secure the bolt?
    No. Pick one.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDave View Post
    Well, the park lube/grease to stop creaking; the loctitce to secure the bolt?
    and how do you propose to prevent the lube from running down into the locktite if they are along the same screw?

    but where is this screw going? you may not even need loctite at all. IMO not a lot of parts on the bicycle really need loctite at all (even if manufacturers use it).

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    I just built up a new Colnago C-RS with Campy Chorus. There's nothing on it that needs loctite.

  8. #8
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    Using loctite on a bolt that has grease applied is a waste of loctite. Loctite needs to be applied to a clean, dry surface or it won't bond at all.

    I always use loctite on chainring bolts and the retaining bolts on Jockey Wheels, but not much else.

    There is a solid case for using loctite on stem bolts, but I've never used it and have never had a problem.

    For any bolt that doesn't get loctite, I apply Boeshield T9 as a corrosion inhibitor. Once the bike is assembled, I go back and apply the T9 to any untreated exposed metal, and always reapply it after any thorough cleaning. It's a great corrosion preventative.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDave View Post
    Well, the park lube/grease to stop creaking; the loctitce to secure the bolt?
    Do you somehow think that the thread locker will somehow penetrate and displace the grease so that it can function independently? It won't. If the grease coats things, then the tread locker won't stick to the greasy surface.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDave View Post
    Well, the park lube/grease to stop creaking; the loctitce to secure the bolt?
    Just like cranking the heat will warm your house and cranking the AC will cool it down. But both ain't going to happen if you crank them both at the same time.


    Use one or the other. There may be some parts that "need" loctite but I've never worked on them. Generally for a bike Loctite is used to prevent corrosion and eventual seizing. Ironically in a way the exact opposite of locking the threads. Grease is used for the same purpose.
    Use either, not both, unless you have a problem with loose screws then use loctite (on the bike that is, not the ones that made you consider using both on the same screw)

  11. #11
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    lube bolts either to enable correct torque where the spec is for lubed, or to prevent seizing. A good example of a place to lube threads is pedals. Loctite is used to prevent a bolt from moving once tightened. I dries and locks the threads in place. I only use blue or red with the blue being considered removable and the red permanent (although it's not really permanent). For the blue I use mostly a stick now, and the red the liquid.

    A bolt that is torqued properly to get the right amount of stretch or has a locking device like a tab on a disc brake or a lock washer really shouldn't need loctite, but I've seen disc brake rotors some with both tabs and loctite preapplied to the bolts.

    There is only one way a lubed bolt with loctite would work as intended that I can see and that would be the deepest threads having the loctite and being dry (no oil), and the shallowest thread having the lube. When torqued the shallow threads are the ones that carry the load anyway and will impact the torque on the bolt. If you don't apply it this way the lube is reducing the functionality of the loctite if not eliminating it. But if I wanted lube and locking, I would just put enough loctite on to be the lube while tightening until it dried, I wouldn't use a lubricant with it.
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  12. #12
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    Isn't the first thing on the LocTite instructions "Make sure both surfaces are clean..."?
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  13. #13
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    Thanks guys, I'll stick with the Park Polylube then. If everything is torqued correctly that should suffice.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    ......


    There is only one way a lubed bolt with loctite would work as intended that I can see and that would be the deepest threads having the loctite and being dry (no oil), and the shallowest thread having the lube. When torqued the shallow threads are the ones that carry the load anyway and will impact the torque on the bolt. If you don't apply it this way the lube is reducing the functionality of the loctite if not eliminating it. But if I wanted lube and locking, I would just put enough loctite on to be the lube while tightening until it dried, I wouldn't use a lubricant with it.

    What on earth are you talking about? Both deep AND shallow threads on the same bolt???? I'm confused.

    Threads should have the same pitch throughout, as well as the same pitch diameter. The only variation I know of are pipe threads, where the pitch is the same all along the length, but the pitch diameter is a conical profile. As far as I know, pipe threads are never used on bikes.

    Perhaps you are talking about "lead in" on a thread? I know that old Raleighs used to come with an NDS bottom bracket bearing cup that lacked a shoulder, and was generally tightened down until the bearing cup threads bottomed on the lead in from the thread tap, but that stuff is like 45+ years ago.

    If you could explain just what you mean? Otherwise, I'd have to say your knowledge is lacking.
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  15. #15
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    What on earth are you talking about? Both deep AND shallow threads on the same bolt???? I'm confused.

    Threads should have the same pitch throughout, as well as the same pitch diameter. The only variation I know of are pipe threads, where the pitch is the same all along the length, but the pitch diameter is a conical profile. As far as I know, pipe threads are never used on bikes.

    Perhaps you are talking about "lead in" on a thread? I know that old Raleighs used to come with an NDS bottom bracket bearing cup that lacked a shoulder, and was generally tightened down until the bearing cup threads bottomed on the lead in from the thread tap, but that stuff is like 45+ years ago.

    If you could explain just what you mean? Otherwise, I'd have to say your knowledge is lacking.
    I believe what he is saying is put loctite on the tip of the bolt (deep threads) and grease on the bottom end of the bolt (shallow threads).
    I suppose it could work. But not worth the effort.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    What on earth are you talking about? Both deep AND shallow threads on the same bolt???? I'm confused.

    Threads should have the same pitch throughout, as well as the same pitch diameter. The only variation I know of are pipe threads, where the pitch is the same all along the length, but the pitch diameter is a conical profile. As far as I know, pipe threads are never used on bikes.

    Perhaps you are talking about "lead in" on a thread? I know that old Raleighs used to come with an NDS bottom bracket bearing cup that lacked a shoulder, and was generally tightened down until the bearing cup threads bottomed on the lead in from the thread tap, but that stuff is like 45+ years ago.

    If you could explain just what you mean? Otherwise, I'd have to say your knowledge is lacking.
    What I meant was if you put loctite on the end of a bolt when dry, screw it in half way then put a drop of oil on the the thread before fully tightening, you might get the benefits of both. I also pointed out that while touques on bikes aren't really that sensative / critical the loctite if used while wet could act as a lubricant to ensure proper torquing.

    As far as the rest of the explanation of how bolts hold and stretch, here's a couple of links for you to read on how bolts work (1st link) and the concept of how the load is distributed across threads for a fastener (2nd link). for the second link look near the bottom to get right to the point I was making. Let me know if this helps explain, I can certainly elaborate further if needed / interested.

    How To: Measure Bolt Stretch For Proper Torque - CPG Nation

    https://www.fastenal.com/en/78/screw-thread-design
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    I believe what he is saying is put loctite on the tip of the bolt (deep threads) and grease on the bottom end of the bolt (shallow threads).
    I suppose it could work. But not worth the effort.
    yep, that's what I meant and agree not worth the effort.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalDave View Post
    Well, the park lube/grease to stop creaking; the loctitce to secure the bolt?
    Sounds like the two will do nothing more than cancel each other out.
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  19. #19
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    I've never used Loctite on the bike.

    Not to hijack the tread, but I do use it on cleats.

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