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  1. #26
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    My torque wrenches are certified +/- 3% and correspond quite well with my Ritchey and CDI torque keys.

  2. #27
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    From 3 T:

    Hi Miles,
    Where did you buy your handlebar? The best thing for you is to ask directly to your dealer for a replacement part.

    Regards

    Davide



  3. #28
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    Be VERY careful with 3T carbon bars & stem-att_1432673733064_20150526_134116.jpgBe VERY careful with 3T carbon bars & stem-20150526_134125.jpgBe VERY careful with 3T carbon bars & stem-20150526_133831.jpg

  4. #29
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    It looks like the blue (in your case) overlay under compression from the stem and faceplate is getting stretched and elongated into the gap - same appearance as the OP. From the photos alone there's nothing evident that suggests any failure of the composite, just the decoration.
    "When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments."
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  5. #30
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    I'll add that Trek had this issue with their female seatpost design on the Madone. They had a sticker under the clearcoat on the mast which would get shmooshed and ugly looking from the seatpost clamp. They eliminated the sticker on more recent models.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  6. #31
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    I find it odd that the clearcoat/resin hasn't cracked on any of the bars shown here. And how do you know that's a decal under there and not paint?

    I have the stealth colored Ergonova bars and I've changed stems a few times with them, might take a look at it later, but not going to pull it apart just on a hunch. Honestly, I'm pretty sure they were on my bike when I hit a car, then transferred to my new frame. I'd say they're pretty durable.

    As for the max torque listed on the parts, there must be a bit of a safety factor involved. I don't think 3T puts 5.5 N*m on there when the bar will break at 5.7 N*m.

    I'm betting the bars are fine. If you didn't hear a crack, it probably didn't crack.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ultimobici View Post
    A proper dial set torque wrench that is returned to zero after use is all I trust.
    Ugh... You should never set a click-type torque wrench to zero, especially for long therm storage. Most wrenches won't even allow you to do that, since their torque ranges begin at some non-zero torque. As for those wrenches that actually "go down to zero", it is the user's responsibility to remember that such wrenches should be stored at low non-zero setting (5, 10 or 20 lb-ft, depending on the range).
    Et si tu tombes 7 fois
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  8. #33
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    Update:

    I took my bike the bike shop where I purchased it, and they checked them out. They found a soft spot while tapping on the bar at the distorted area. They are sending them back to 3T.

  9. #34
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    use a torque wrench

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milest View Post
    Update:

    I took my bike the bike shop where I purchased it, and they checked them out. They found a soft spot while tapping on the bar at the distorted area.
    Of course they did, there's bubbles in the cosmetic outer layer. But they can't make the call due to liability. I bet the house the bars are structurally fine. If they were mine I'd probably get impatient and cut away the bubble for a closer look. Nonetheless, you'll probably get new bars as a good will thing.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndreyT View Post
    Ugh... You should never set a click-type torque wrench to zero, especially for long therm storage. Most wrenches won't even allow you to do that, since their torque ranges begin at some non-zero torque. As for those wrenches that actually "go down to zero", it is the user's responsibility to remember that such wrenches should be stored at low non-zero setting (5, 10 or 20 lb-ft, depending on the range).
    unless you have a digital torque wrench then you have to remove the battery to prevent the batteries from accidently leaking and ruining the wrench and there is no need to store it with 10 to 20 ft lbs or even 200 or 0 won't hurt it, but in this case concerning a mechanical torque wrench you're right about how to store those type of torque wrenches.

  12. #37
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    A proper dial set torque wrench that is returned to zero after use is all I trust.
    Use a real torque wrench, that zeros after use. Torque keys are for carrying in a saddlebag not for workshops.
    As part of an MSA at work we checked 3 torque keys 3 people had with unknown histories vs 4 calibrated production torque wrenches. The 3 torque keys had a tighter distribution and less variance than the calibrated production torque wrenches
    Ugh... You should never set a click-type torque wrench to zero, especially for long therm storage.
    I find the names people use for torque wrenches interesting and confusing.

    I learned (naval nuclear power world) 3 types of torque wrenches: flexible beam, micrometer setting, and dial indicating. Now the rise of torque keys add another type.

    Seems most here use micrometer setting (what I think people also reference as click type). However, those are the least reliable type (as far as keeping calibration). Until you are spending hundreds of dollars and maintaining proper calibration schedules, I pick flexible beam. If I had a few hundred dollars, I'd pick a dial indicating. I trust micrometer setting the least.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    I find the names people use for torque wrenches interesting and confusing.

    I learned (naval nuclear power world) 3 types of torque wrenches: flexible beam, micrometer setting, and dial indicating. Now the rise of torque keys add another type.
    There's a fourth now -- digital (electronic).
    "When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments."
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  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milest View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ATT_1432673733064_20150526_134116.jpg 
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ID:	306259
    Hey, cool, where did you find the blue ones? Those would look sweet on my 2014 R3!!!
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  15. #40
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    FWIW and since I said I'd keep people updated, the US 3T distributor is playing deaf, dumb, and blind with my LBS (a VERY large retailer in Boulder). They don't even want to look at the bar. LBS is going to send it to them anyway and has offered to give me a little extra discount on a future purchase if 3T doesn't make good on it. Yet another reason to patronize your LBS!
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  16. #41
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    Check if the faceplate of the stem is out of round. I had the same thing happen to me with a Easton bar years ago. When assembled the faceplate with no bar...I noticed that the upper part of the faceplate was curving down. There is a topic on Weight Weenies a while back.

    Quote Originally Posted by thisisatest
    i'll reply to your reply of an old reply:
    the 3t face plates start out properly shaped, but are too thin, especially near the "ears" that the bolts go through. the bolts end up trying to bend the ears towards the stem, and the inside edge of the face plate bends into the bar. so it creases the bar.
    this is also why the ti bolts break on these stems- area around the bolt head is no longer flush, it forces the bolt into a bend.

  17. #42
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    That makes a lot of sense, thanks.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sumguy1 View Post

    I wonder if you can lightly tap the bars with a hex wrench and hear a difference in sound if the clamping area is crushed.
    This can work, but it's not a fool proof method for sure.

    If you see something like this 3T bar, and do the tap test, I would not ride that thing on anything but a trainer.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by AvantDale View Post
    Check if the faceplate of the stem is out of round. I had the same thing happen to me with a Easton bar years ago. When assembled the faceplate with no bar...I noticed that the upper part of the faceplate was curving down. There is a topic on Weight Weenies a while back.
    Makes a lot of sense as most people report failure at the heads, but I have seen posts claiming other brand Ti bolts fared perfectly fine.

  20. #45
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    FWIW - My LBS in Houston gave me a loaner bar and sent mine damaged bar to 3T. I just got word that my replacement bar is ready for me to pick up. I am out of the country for a few months and therefore can't ask who they sent it too, etc. So far I am not aware of any cost to me. The whole replacement took about six weeks.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    I feel kind of like Captain Obvious here, but just in case, I thought I'd save someone else some expense and aggravation...

    I really don't want to start a new debate about why anyone would want to run carbon bars, but thought I'd pass this along.

    I installed 2 sets of 3T Ergo Nova Team (carbon) bars on 3T Arx Team (aluminum) stems. Since they were carbon bars, I was VERY careful and used a torque wrench (used both the Bontrager and Ritchey wrenches that are pre-set to 5Nm, the torque clearly recommended on the stem), tightened the bolts in a cross pattern and made sure the gap at the top and bottom of the camp was the same. In fact the BARS say the max torque is 5.5Nm so I felt pretty safe tightening to 5Nm. I say I used both wrenches because I switched stems around a bit but all were 3T stems. Somewhere along the line, this happened: Attachment 306191Attachment 306192

    After taking this bike to the LBS who told me the bar was dangerously crushed, I took a very close look at my other bike that has a similar set-up and though much less obvious, it has the same damage. Again, I NEVER tightened the stem bolts with anything other than a torque wrench (and I know not not to use fixed torque wrenches to loosen bolts too).

    Advice from the LBS was to use friction paste (which I had as you can see in the photo) and DON'T tighten to the max ("recommended" in my book as a conservative engineer) torque. Just tighten until it feels snug and haul on the bars to make sure they don't move.

    They're going to try to warranty the bars with 3T, but I'm not optimistic.

    Here endeth the $700 lesson.
    This is my first posting, yes, to an older post, but here's my recent experience. Over the years I have had NO problems at all with 3T Ti stem bolts on any ARX Team stems. One day SNAP, then SNAP a few days later. I had been in a hurry and used a 5nm Bontager torque key. I replaced the Ti bolts and successfully torqued to 5nm with a newer Shimano torque wrench. Then I tested a 5nm Ritchey torque key on the same newly torqued bolts and it released immediately. Then I tested the questionable 5nm Bontrager torque key I had used before. It turned almost a half turn more before I stopped the test, not wanting to snap the bolt. I then tested another identical Bontrager torque key we had lying around. It turned even further! I immediately tossed the Bontrager torque keys. Hope this helps.

  22. #47
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    Just to keep this alive - these bars are a menace. I have crushed a couple and I am meticulous about the torque settings. And below 5nm, the bars slip - 3T LTD stem and 3T LTD bars. I am moving to Easton after going through three very expensive bars.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fondi54 View Post
    This is my first posting, yes, to an older post, but here's my recent experience. Over the years I have had NO problems at all with 3T Ti stem bolts on any ARX Team stems. One day SNAP, then SNAP a few days later. I had been in a hurry and used a 5nm Bontager torque key. I replaced the Ti bolts and successfully torqued to 5nm with a newer Shimano torque wrench. Then I tested a 5nm Ritchey torque key on the same newly torqued bolts and it released immediately. Then I tested the questionable 5nm Bontrager torque key I had used before. It turned almost a half turn more before I stopped the test, not wanting to snap the bolt. I then tested another identical Bontrager torque key we had lying around. It turned even further! I immediately tossed the Bontrager torque keys. Hope this helps.
    I've become suspect of any fixed torque keys/wrenches. I've head the opposite experience. The Bontrager one seems OK, but I've more recently found that the Ritchey 5nM key "clicks" at WAAAAY over 5nm. So that was probably my problem. Since this experience, I've only been using the Park adjustable torque wrench and haven't had any more problems. Also FWIW with friction paste, my bars don't slip at 4nM. As always, YMMV.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

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