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  1. #1
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    Will a SRAM Yaw 22 FD work with a 10 speed setup?

    Or are the throw and cage spacings incompatible with a 10 speed chain/wheel?

  2. #2
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    Should still work...you still only have two rings in the front.

  3. #3
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    Works fine with my 2011 Force 10 speed group

  4. #4
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    Just make sure you watch the video several times before you attempt to install. Not rocket science but the procedure is completely different than anything you may have installed in the past from any maker

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    Thanks, folks.

    Next question: Is it worth it? I currently have a Rival FD on my 10-speed group, but have never liked the way it shifted. The trim function works fine. Just found a good price on the Force 22 Yaw and thought it might be worth a try.

    So is it worth it? Thx.

  6. #6
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    I've read that it does work better. You'll lose the trim feature in your current levers.

  7. #7
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    what's the difference between a 10 speed Yaw front derailleur and an 11 speed? Is there any difference re the amount of movement?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevesbike View Post
    what's the difference between a 10 speed Yaw front derailleur and an 11 speed? Is there any difference re the amount of movement?
    That's what I was wondering. I just looked at the Exogram crankset and the "22" and regular 10-speed versions have the same weight, but there were no dimension changes that I could discern.

  9. #9
    A Midwesterner In Europe
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    Yes.

    I never liked the original SRAM FD's. I had been using a 5700 series 105 FD for awhile and I just swapped it out for a Force 22 FD.

    Will a SRAM Yaw 22 FD work with a 10 speed setup?-sram-force-22-fd.jpg

    Here's the setup I'm running.

    SRAM Force 10spd shifters (2011?)
    Shimano Ultegra chain 6701
    Rotor crank with Stronglight CT2 chainrings (52/36)
    SRAM Force 22 FD

    It works really really well. Such a difference in front shifting quality.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by j.king View Post
    Yes.

    I never liked the original SRAM FD's. I had been using a 5700 series 105 FD for awhile and I just swapped it out for a Force 22

    Here's the setup I'm running.

    SRAM Force 10spd shifters (2011?)
    Shimano Ultegra chain 6701
    Rotor crank with Stronglight CT2 chainrings (52/36)
    SRAM Force 22 FD

    It works really really well. Such a difference in front shifting quality.
    This is exactly what I was looking to hear. The Force 22 Yaw dérailleur looks like a real bargain.

    Thanks to all for your responses!

  11. #11
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    Wouldn't the cage be narrower on 22 front der since its intended for a thinner 11 spd chain?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by farva View Post
    Wouldn't the cage be narrower on 22 front der since its intended for a thinner 11 spd chain?
    This is what I was concerned about too. From Wikipedia
    Sizes
    Exploded view of a few bicycle chain links

    The chain in use on modern bicycles has a 1/2" pitch, which is ANSI standard #40, where the 4 in "#40" indicates the pitch of the chain in eighths of an inch, and metric #8, where the 8 indicates the pitch in sixteenths of an inch.
    Width

    Chains come in either 11/128", 3/32", 1/8", 5/32", or 3/16" roller widths, and this is also the internal width between the inner plates. Chains with 1/8" wide rollers are used on bikes with a single rear sprocket: those with coaster brakes, hub gears, fixed gears such as track bicycles, or BMX bikes. Chains with 3/32" wide rollers are used on bikes with derailleurs such as racing, touring, and mountain bikes.[7] Fixed sprockets and freewheels are also available in 3/32" widths so fixed-gear and single-speed bikes can be set up to use narrow and lighter 3/32" chains. Finally, chains with 5/32" wide rollers are used on freight bicycles and tricycles.

    With derailleur equipped bicycles, the external width of the chain also matters, because chains must not be too wide for the cogset or they will rub on the next larger sprocket or too narrow that they might fall between two sprockets. Chains can also be identified by the number of rear sprockets they can support, anywhere from 3 to 11, and the list below enables measuring a chain of unknown origin to determine its suitability.

    6 speed - 7.8mm (all brands)
    7 speed - 7.3mm (all brands)
    8 speed - 7.1mm (all brands)
    9 speed - 6.6 to 6.8mm (all brands)
    10 speed - 6.2mm (Shimano, Campagnolo)
    10 speed(Narrow) - 5.88mm (Campagnolo, KMC)
    10 speed(Narrow, Direction) - 5.88mm (Shimano CN-5700,CN-6700,CN-7900)
    11 speed - 5.5mm (Campagnolo, KMC, Shimano CN-9000)
    The chain width difference is pretty small, 0.33 mm = 0.013". In fact, that's so small that I wonder if an 11 speed chain might work just fine on a 10-speed setup, with the benefits of easier adjustment and quieter operation.

    As to the front derailleur, from Sheldon Brown's website 6-speed, 7-speed, 8-speed, 9-speed, 10-speed, 11-speed?:
    Derailers-Front
    Front derailers don't generally care how many gears you have in back, though models designated for higher numbers of speeds may have slightly narrower cages , so they might be a bit more fussy in adjustment/trim when used with wider chains.

    Front derailers are generally 2- or 3-chainring specific.

    "Triple" front derailers have a wide, shaped inner cage plate. They generally work OK with double chainrings as long as the step between the chainring sizes is matched to the derailer.
    "Double" front derailers work well with triple chainrings as long as the step between the outer and middle chainrings is only 4 or 5 teeth (as in a half-step system). If the step is larger, shifting from the small to the middle chainring will require some care and skill. In fact, you may need to upshift all the way to the big chainring, then jump back down to the middle.
    Later, the inestimable Mr. Brown writes:
    Chainrings/Cranks
    Old Chainrings, New Chains
    There is a lot of confusion about the compatibility of narrow 9- and 10-speed chains with older cranksets. Shimano says you should replace the inner chainring(s) with specially designated 9- or 10-speed ones, but then they're all too eager to sell you stuff, whether you need it or not.

    These chainrings have the teeth slightly farther to the right than the older chainrings to work a little better with the narrower chains. There is no difference whatever in the crank spiders.

    The manufacturers also are concerned about clueless users. The worst-case scenario is that you will be riding along with the bike in its highest gear (large front, small rear) and then for some bizarre reason shift down in front before downshifting in the back. (There is no shift pattern in which it is reasonable to shift in this sequence.) [Not with a 9- or 10-speed cassette, to be sure -- John Allen] If you do shift this way, there's a small chance that the chain might "skate" over the edges of the teeth for maybe half a turn.

    In practice this "problem" almost never materializes. Many, many cyclists are using 9- and 10-speed chains with older cranksets and having no problems whatever.
    New Chainrings, Old Chains

    Going the other direction, using wider chains with chainrings intended for narrower chains is not generally a major problem if there's only a one- or two- generation difference. The only problem you might run into is that the chain will be more liable to rub on the inside of the bigger chainrings in the small/small crossover gears, gears you shouldn't be using in any case.
    Take all that together and it sounds like the front derailleur should work just fine. An 11-speed chain sounds like it would work fine too. I've done a little web surfing and there is some evidence that everything should work, but I'd do a little more searching before trying such a switch.

  13. #13
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    For reference: Just bought the Force 22 Yaw FD off Amazon (through Xtreme Bike & Sport) for $56.70 shipped (including chain spotter!).
    Amazon.com: SRAM Force22 Braze-On Front Derailleur: Sports & Outdoors

    That's on par with an Ultegra FD and cheaper than a Dura Ace that some people have used when dissatisfied with the standard, non-Yaw SRAM FDs.

    Can't find the link now, but one of the big cycling mags tested all sorts of combos and estimated you got 90% of the benefit going Yaw FD with regular crankset combared to Yaw FD and Red crankset.

    EDIT: Found it! It works! We test SRAM Red backwards compatibility
    Last edited by AJ88V; 07-19-2013 at 06:54 AM.

  14. #14
    A Midwesterner In Europe
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    Quote Originally Posted by AJ88V View Post

    The chain width difference is pretty small, 0.33 mm = 0.013". In fact, that's so small that I wonder if an 11 speed chain might work just fine on a 10-speed setup, with the benefits of easier adjustment and quieter operation.
    Off topic but...I know the new Dura-Ace will shift perfectly fine on a 10spd cassette everything else being 11 spd.

    As far as the 11 spd Force 22 FD cage width there is nothing to be concerned about. Since installing the Force 22 FD and having put some decent km's on it I've had not a single issue. It works great you'll love it.

  15. #15
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    FYI: there's another thread going on this and i made some comments regarding my experience trying this over there. LINK

  16. #16
    B05
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    My current set up of all 2011 Rival + 2012 Red crank is going to be changed to:

    - Ultegra 6750 crank
    - SRAM Force 22 FD

    Should work correct?

  17. #17
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    Yes, it will work fine. I run SRAM Red 10 speed with Red yaw 22 fd along with dura ace 7950 crankset and have no issues. It does shift better in the front, but honestly my dura ace 7800 bike has better front shifting.

  18. #18
    B05
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSWhaler View Post
    Yes, it will work fine. I run SRAM Red 10 speed with Red yaw 22 fd along with dura ace 7950 crankset and have no issues. It does shift better in the front, but honestly my dura ace 7800 bike has better front shifting.
    would you recommend a 7800 FD then?

    any chain rub on the yaw 22 fd?

    thanks!

  19. #19
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    Yaw 22 FD

    Quote Originally Posted by JSWhaler View Post
    It does shift better in the front
    How much better does it shift?

  20. #20
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    I've used a DA. 7800, sram force, and now the newest YAW fd. The YAW works the best and I'd just get it and be done with it. I only get chain rub if I cross chain, otherwise no issues. It shifts well, just not as good as shimano IMO. However, I love the rear shifting.

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