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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    workstands- what is necessary for carbon?

    I am currently building a new bike, and need a workstand. I think I want a Parks PCS-20, but have some questions. I do think a standard downtube clamp would be the most versatile stand, but with a new carbon frame, I do worry about clamping the tubes. The PCS- 20 seems to solve this issue by strapping the BB and clamping at the dropouts.

    My issue is that I am not sure that a PCS-20 (which has dropout clamps) will be able to work with the other family bikes, ie kids bikes, when needed. I am not sure if there is a difference in dropout width and whether the stand can accommodate that.

    Should I get a frame clamp and just be careful about clamp pressure, or will the PCS-20 work for other, non road bikes?

    thanks

  2. #2
    duh...
    Reputation: FatTireFred's Avatar
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    you don't have to clamp it tight... or you can use the sp if round
    .


    Quote Originally Posted by mikagsd
    Fat tire Fred....you are the bike god of the universe and unless someone agrees with your reasoning they are just plain stupid

  3. #3
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    +1 I try to only use the seat post. Even if its carbon much cheaper to replace then the frame if it gets crunched

  4. #4
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    Reputation: ClassicSteel71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sgtgeo
    +1 I try to only use the seat post. Even if its carbon much cheaper to replace then the frame if it gets crunched
    Don't try. ONLY CLAMP ON THE POST...

  5. #5
    Big is relative
    Reputation: bigbill's Avatar
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    I have the park stand and it's easy to use. I don't have any carbon bikes, I just like the stand.
    Retired sailor

  6. #6
    n00bsauce
    Reputation: Mel Erickson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClassicSteel71
    Don't try. ONLY CLAMP ON THE POST...
    Sometimes it's not possible to clamp on the post. Not enough exposed post, too wide a clamp. It's fine to clamp on the seat tube near the junction with the top tube/seat cluster. The post is inside the seat tube in this area, especially if there isn't much seatpost exposed, and reinforces the seat tube. I've done this plenty of times and it's perfectly safe.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire

    There are your fog people & your sun people, he said. I said I wasn't sure which kind I was. He nodded. Fog'll do that to you, he said.

    "We are all ignorant about most things."
    Mel Erickson

  7. #7
    duh...
    Reputation: FatTireFred's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Erickson
    Sometimes it's not possible to clamp on the post. Not enough exposed post, too wide a clamp. It's fine to clamp on the seat tube near the junction with the top tube/seat cluster. The post is inside the seat tube in this area, especially if there isn't much seatpost exposed, and reinforces the seat tube. I've done this plenty of times and it's perfectly safe.


    you can always pull the post out farther, if there is length (usually, these days)
    .


    Quote Originally Posted by mikagsd
    Fat tire Fred....you are the bike god of the universe and unless someone agrees with your reasoning they are just plain stupid

  8. #8
    Old Skool
    Reputation: Stogaguy's Avatar
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    Thumbs up +1 - Park PRS-20

    I have adapted this response form one of my earlier posts in a similar thread.

    I have a Park PRS-20 and recommend it very highly. As you know, it is a "euro" style repair stand that supports the bottom bracket in a cradle and clamps the dropouts (front or rear). For most operations, I clamp the fork end or drop out and do not bother with the BB strap.

    Advantages:
    • Super stable.
    • You never have to worry about crushing or marring a tube or seatpost by clamping.
    • Folds very small for storage or transport.
    • Accommodates any bike with 100mm front fork ends. This includes all of the kid's bikes and "cruisers" I have tried in it.
    Disadvantages:
    • Price. At about $200, it is not cheap. (Well worth it IMHO)
    • Does not allow you to flip the bike upside down like a conventional clamp style stand.
    • Only accommodates 130 mm and 135 mm rear drop outs (current "road" and "mountain" standards). I can make my old steel 126 mm spaced bikes fit no problem, but a 120 mm ("track") spaced bike probably would not fly.
    Here is a link to Park's website:
    http://www.parktool.com/products/det...23&item=PRS-20

    Here is a link to the original thread:
    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sho...70417#poststop
    The avatar is not me; just cool and suitably old skool.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Ummmm, you don't actually need a workstand to build a bike....

  10. #10
    eRacer
    Reputation: jmlapoint's Avatar
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    +1 Park PRS-20
    Only Clamp Seat Post.

    PARK PRS-20 TEAM RACE STAND
    Name:  Park PRS-20 Team Race Stand.jpg
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    Last edited by jmlapoint; 06-29-2009 at 10:04 AM.
    John Lapoint / San Diego
    God is Great, Beer is Good, and People are Crazy!

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: DHallerman's Avatar
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    Better Than Seat Post

    The seat post doesn't always work.

    But the Park Internal Seat Tube Clamp (ISC-4) will work with any workstand, any bike.

    Worth it, if you also like to make your wrenching life easier.


  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by olr1
    Ummmm, you don't actually need a workstand to build a bike....

    Ok....yea I would prefer not to buy one if possible, but how do you fine tune the front and rear derailleurs without? Seems like it would be pretty hard. I am really curious, if I can get any without, then I may. Currently still waiting on the group being mailed.

    thanks

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    flip it upside down.

  14. #14
    Roadie with unshaven legs
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    If your bike doesn't use a non-round seatpost then just buy a cheap, used aluminum seatpost from fleabay that fits and swap that in every time you need to use the workstand.

  15. #15
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    Umm, you lean the bike against a wall, get the derailleurs about right, then ride it and tweak as appropriate.

    Or, and this is the advanced stage; turn the bike upside down and set your gears that way, but don't tell everyone, or they'll all be trying it....

  16. #16
    Steaming piles of opinion
    Reputation: danl1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rglewisjr
    Ok....yea I would prefer not to buy one if possible, but how do you fine tune the front and rear derailleurs without? Seems like it would be pretty hard. I am really curious, if I can get any without, then I may. Currently still waiting on the group being mailed.

    thanks
    Have a trainer?

    There are also the bike stands that grab the stays. Not much use for anything but a tuneup, but if you are cutting it cheap, it's $25 or so.

    I love my PRS-20, but wouldn't mind having a traditional clamp-style for odd bikes and for cleaning, etc.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

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