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  1. #1
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    2005 Redline Conquest Disc-R, New shifters for Avid Brakes?

    Hi all,

    Just picked up a 2005 Redline Conquest Disc-R, as I wanted a cyclocross bike, but just don't have the funds for a new one. I figure this will be a big building project, and learning curve for me. I'll be using it as a commuter, and also for some single track around Vancouver. The bike has a lot of random parts on it right now, and I'm looking to get it to more a stable condition. First to go will be the bullhorn bars. I've already ordered a Cowbell 3 46mm handler bar, however, I believe i need new briftes for the "avid mechanical brakes" that are on there, as the current bullhorn brifters are very beat up. Does anyone know which brifters will work for these old brakes? I'm starting to think I should of maybe bought a new cheap CX bike I'm coming from a MTB background! I also may order a new Salsa Stem. I'm around 6'0, whats everyones preference for height, and degree?

    Sorry for the mass amount of info! The whole road bike scene/CX scene is new to me! I've tried to search as much as possible.

    Extra Question: I assume the spindle for most CX bikes like this is 9/16?

    Thanks for the help!

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  3. #3
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    I don't know if road shifters will play well with your Avids or not. I also didn't know that there were integrated shifters specific to going on bullhorns. And I don't know who made your derailleurs.

    Avid disc brakes are available in both road and mountain versions. It seems likely that yours would be a road version, since you have a road bike. They should say "road" or maybe "R" on the caliper somewhere. Also, if they've been working well with your current brake levers and you have short pull levers, they're road levers. That means they'll work fine with new road levers too. But since it's a used bike and the previous owner has done at least one thing weird...

    I don't know if the shifters in your link would work or not. That's what knowing who made your rear derailleur would tell me. Also, the number of cogs you have, although since cassettes are pretty cheap relative to shifters, I usually match my cassette to my shifter and not the other way around.

    Whether or not the shifters in your link will drop into the rest of your drivetrain, for me, if I'm buying aftermarket anyway, I'd be looking at at least Tiagra or maybe the 2013 Sora. Basically whichever's cheaper.

    Can you post a picture of your current shifters?

    As far as stem size is concerned, you're going to have to experiment with that for yourself. What's the size of the frame?

  4. #4
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    Depends which model brakes you have. If they are set up for the longer/linear pull MTB type brakes, then I don't know if there are any brifters with linear pull. I used the BB7/Road disc brakes on my new cross bike and run those with some modified (RetroShift) Tektro brake levers with integrated shifters:
    - DSCF1325

    Really happy with the setup, it works well and has been very reliable so far in about 1000 miles of riding. I think RetroShift now has a linear pull brake lever set up for the bar end shifters as well:
    - CXV

    But if you have the road version of the disc brakes, then most any road brake lever should work.
    Last edited by 4Crawler; 10-17-2012 at 09:32 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I don't know if road shifters will play well with your Avids or not. I also didn't know that there were integrated shifters specific to going on bullhorns. And I don't know who made your derailleurs.

    Avid disc brakes are available in both road and mountain versions. It seems likely that yours would be a road version, since you have a road bike. They should say "road" or maybe "R" on the caliper somewhere. Also, if they've been working well with your current brake levers and you have short pull levers, they're road levers. That means they'll work fine with new road levers too. But since it's a used bike and the previous owner has done at least one thing weird...

    I don't know if the shifters in your link would work or not. That's what knowing who made your rear derailleur would tell me. Also, the number of cogs you have, although since cassettes are pretty cheap relative to shifters, I usually match my cassette to my shifter and not the other way around.

    Whether or not the shifters in your link will drop into the rest of your drivetrain, for me, if I'm buying aftermarket anyway, I'd be looking at at least Tiagra or maybe the 2013 Sora. Basically whichever's cheaper.

    Can you post a picture of your current shifters?

    As far as stem size is concerned, you're going to have to experiment with that for yourself. What's the size of the frame?
    Thanks for the information! I do know the original "brifters" that were on the bike with "Avid Mechanical Road Disk" were the original Shimano 105 Dual Controls. I just have no idea where to source these. I will find out more, and possibly post a picture or too for you to see. Thanks again.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Crawler View Post
    Depends which model brakes you have. If they are set up for the longer/linear pull MTB type brakes, then I don't know if there are any brifters with linear pull. I used the BB7/Road disc brakes on my new cross bike and run those with some modified (RetroShift) Tektro brake levers with integrated shifters:
    - DSCF1325

    Really happy with the setup, it works well and has been very reliable so far in about 1000 miles of riding. I think RetroShift now has a linear pull brake lever set up for the bar end shifters as well:
    - CXV

    But if you have the road version of the disc brakes, then most any road brake lever should work.
    I like the look of the CXV. All i know is the brakes were "Avid Mechanical Road Disc". Think those will work then?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmou1t View Post
    I like the look of the CXV. All i know is the brakes were "Avid Mechanical Road Disc". Think those will work then?
    For road discs, you would not need the linear pull CXV brakes. You could use the other ones (CX2), or any other integrated road brake/shifter that matches the rest of the drive train.

    I run the CX2 brake levers with 10sp bar end shifters attached and the Avid BB7/road discs and that setup works well.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmou1t View Post
    Hi all,

    Just picked up a 2005 Redline Conquest Disc-R, as I wanted a cyclocross bike, but just don't have the funds for a new one. I figure this will be a big building project, and learning curve for me. I'll be using it as a commuter, and also for some single track around Vancouver. The bike has a lot of random parts on it right now, and I'm looking to get it to more a stable condition. First to go will be the bullhorn bars. I've already ordered a Cowbell 3 46mm handler bar, however, I believe i need new briftes for the "avid mechanical brakes" that are on there, as the current bullhorn brifters are very beat up. Does anyone know which brifters will work for these old brakes? I'm starting to think I should of maybe bought a new cheap CX bike I'm coming from a MTB background! I also may order a new Salsa Stem. I'm around 6'0, whats everyones preference for height, and degree?

    Sorry for the mass amount of info! The whole road bike scene/CX scene is new to me! I've tried to search as much as possible.

    Extra Question: I assume the spindle for most CX bikes like this is 9/16?

    Thanks for the help!
    Quote Originally Posted by tmou1t View Post
    I'm going by:
    BikePedia - 2005 Redline Conquest Disc-R Complete Bicycle

    so... you have a 9-speed drivetrain with compact crank. So, you'll need an equivalent for replacement. The 2300 in your link won't be suitable.

    The current 2013 Sora is 9-speed now, or look for a slightly older Tiagra 4500
    2010 Specialized Secteur Elite upgraded with 32T cassette and does not have Stan's (yet)
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp 29er upgraded with 36T cassette and Stan's Arch EX rims and tubeless. Considering a 1x10 upgrade
    2013 Cannondale CAADX-6 Tiagra upgraded to 32T cassette and Stan's Alpha 400 rims and tubeless
    2008/2009 Burton T6 156cm with Burton Triad Bindings & DC Judge boots

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Crawler View Post
    For road discs, you would not need the linear pull CXV brakes. You could use the other ones (CX2), or any other integrated road brake/shifter that matches the rest of the drive train.

    I run the CX2 brake levers with 10sp bar end shifters attached and the Avid BB7/road discs and that setup works well.
    Great! I'm looking into these!!! Trying to find some reviews etc. Is the shifting awkward at all?

    Is there a common stem degree to try? I need a starting point to try with the cowbells. I figure I'll go with a 10mm, but don't know what degree to start with.

  10. #10
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    CXV or CX

    tmou1t - 4Crawler is correct the CX model would be the correct choice for your set up. They work with the BB7 Road calipers. The CXV is a long pull lever for Linear-pull (V-brakes) and standard disc calipers that would usually be found on an MTB like the regular BB7. The CXV is the only drop bar integrated shifting system for those brakes.

    Here is a description/review of both of them to provide more info:

    Guitar Ted Productions: Retroshift Update

    Also Issue 17 (came out last month) of Cyclocross Magazine also has a review.. Reviewer and editor of the magazine liked them enough to say they would be the first choice of shifter if building up a bike from scratch.

    Shifting is awkward from the drops Basically we state as clearly as we can that the system does not shift from the drops. Just like bar-end shifters you must move your hand from the drop position (hand in drops, fingers on brakes) to shift. It is still not hard to do.

    From the hoods however shifting is different to the competitors (STI/DoubleTap/Ergopower) but no less effective. It even has a couple of advantages which added to low weight, reliability and cost make them a very sound option for riding in adverse conditions.

    Thanks for considering our system!

    Cheers,


    The Goats
    Retroshift LLC
    Portland, OR

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the info everyone. Looking at the CX2 as we speak.

    Whats a good stem degree to start with for the Cowbell 3? I've never ridden drops before. I'm getting the Cowbell 3 in 44cm, and 100mm Pro Moto 3 stem. I know its personal, but a degree to start with? 75/105?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmou1t View Post
    Great! I'm looking into these!!! Trying to find some reviews etc. Is the shifting awkward at all?

    Is there a common stem degree to try? I need a starting point to try with the cowbells. I figure I'll go with a 10mm, but don't know what degree to start with.
    I like the shifting from the hoods. It feels really natural and intuitive, just finger or thumb pressure to shift one way or the other. It gets a little harder to access the gears at the far end of the range since the levers rotate around and out, so you can't reach it with the thumb quite as easy. But then I find I can reach with fingers and pull it back to the last gear position or two. I have bar end shifters on my road bike and like the RetroShift setup better. With the bar ends, you have to move a hand to shift no matter where your hands are. On the R/S setup, if on the hoods, gears are right there and if you are on top or in the drops, you have to move a hand to shift. But I also like that I have the fall back to friction shifting at the turn of the selector on the shifter. Never had to use it but if one day the shifting goes to heck on a long ride, nice to have that friction mode to fall back on. All my other bikes are friction shift, so that is what I am used to and it has worked for me for many decades.

    On stems, I initially started with a Ritchie 100mm adjustable and ended up with that angled up all the way, but this weekend am switching that for a 60mm / 30deg. stem. I interested, I'll probably no longer be needing the adjustable stem if you wanted to try one like that. I think it does +/- around 30 degrees.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmou1t View Post
    Thanks for the info everyone. Looking at the CX2 as we speak.

    Whats a good stem degree to start with for the Cowbell 3? I've never ridden drops before. I'm getting the Cowbell 3 in 44cm, and 100mm Pro Moto 3 stem. I know its personal, but a degree to start with? 75/105?
    I think +/- 6 is a good place to start. While maybe not as fashionable as a +/- 17 in the "down" position, they're also not as dorky as a +/- 17 in the "up" position and if you don't have a really ginormous spacer stack but you do have some, a +/- 6 shouldn't leave any gaps in the height at which you can land your stem clamp.

    I usually buy cheap stems, especially if I don't know if the size is going to be right. One of my local shops has 'em for $10. If you want a nice stem, get one with the same dimensions as the cheap stem that landed the bars in the right place for you.

  14. #14
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    Thanks for the help again! Maybe someone can help me out here with another Q:

    I keep catching my pedal on corners, and places where I never use to catch with other bikes. I've already ordered a set of lower profile pedals, but I doubt this will fix all the problems. I'm assuming its the bottom bracket dimensions? Is it possible to change JUST the bottom bracket to allow for more clearance, or would I change the whole bikes geometry?

  15. #15
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    You could try some shorter cranks for a little extra clearance. But likely it is a lower bottom bracket height causing the clearance issue.

  16. #16
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    You just can't pedal through quite as sharp a corner. You can also try leaning your body more than the bike, but I find pedaling really awkward if I do something like that.

    Unless the pedals you have now are really huge or really wide, it won't make much of a difference. What do you have now?

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    Pedals are a standard 12pin mountain bike pedal. I don't really want a clipless pedal as I use the bike for commuting, and like the ability to get off when I'm on campus etc. I've ordered a set of 17mm Thick pedals, so we'll see if that changes anything. I'm doubtful.

  18. #18
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    nice sharing........

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmou1t View Post
    Pedals are a standard 12pin mountain bike pedal. I don't really want a clipless pedal as I use the bike for commuting, and like the ability to get off when I'm on campus etc. I've ordered a set of 17mm Thick pedals, so we'll see if that changes anything. I'm doubtful.
    Well, I stand corrected. You are using a big honkin' pedal.

    Can you cancel your order? More MTB pedals are not the way to go here, IMO.

    I don't like to wear funny shoes to ride a few miles to school either. I have some inexpensive cage pedals and toe clips. They're narrower than MTB pedals, so while they're still relatively thick, I have to tip the bike pretty far over before I get pedal strike. It takes a slightly unusual circumstance, maybe cornering hard onto an uphill section, to cause a problem.

    If you really want to improve your clearance, old-fashioned track pedals are another option. They run a little narrower and often have some material removed at the lower outside corners to add that little extra bit more clearance. You'll want to use toe clips with them. I prefer platform pedals with toe clips to MTB flats unless I'm actually using the pedals for skill building on a MTB.

    Here's a web page with some nicer platform pedals for road bikes. Not exactly a rare product, but finding a bunch of them listed in the same place can be hard.
    9/16" Bicycle Pedals and Shoes from Harris Cyclery

  20. #20
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    Thanks for the site! Do you have something like the MKS Grip King, or the Sylvan Stream? The Origin 8 tracks look very small? I think you're right as I need something narrower/shallower. The other day I was coming into my parking garage, and was turning down a small decline (15degrees roughly) fairly fast, and I caught the edge of the pedal and bailed completely.

    I see what you mean about the track pedals, my only problem is the grip with them in the rain and "normal shoes". I do currently have toe clips, but still find myself slipping sometimes. It may be that I'm still using old plastic toe clips, and should probably switch to some of those new nylon/velcro ones.
    Last edited by tmou1t; 10-22-2012 at 11:22 AM.

  21. #21
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    No. I have $15 pedals from REI. And cheap plastic toe clips and nylon straps. But it's enough. What kind of shoes do you typically wear? I usually wear old running shoes, unless I'm doing something that calls for more specific footwear like safety toes or dressier shoes, although I'm really fine in whatever. The straps need to be cinched down though. I don't whale on them or anything, but enough that they provide that little extra pressure.

  22. #22
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    Yeah normally I wear an athletic type shoe, unless Im doing trail riding. I like look of those stream pedals, but Im worry they wont fit my Size 10.5 feet.

  23. #23
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    For big feet, you need big toe clips. They come in sizes.

  24. #24
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    Yeah not to worry about the toe clip size, but more just the general diameter of the pedals.

  25. #25
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    Just stumbled across these;

    Wallner Pro | All-City Cycles

    Quite thick, but not as wide.

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