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  1. #1
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    Anyone use moustache bars for cx?

    Is there any problem trying to use moustache handlebars for cyclocross? Just giving it a thought, and wondered if there would be unforseen problems. They would suit me well if I could use them.

  2. #2
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    They are fine under USAC rules but too wide for UCI rules. I know a guy that uses them, they seem like a nice mix of drop bars and flat or riser bars. If you already use them, great. If you are considering using them, remember you have to have the stem shorter and higher than for typical road bars.

  3. #3
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    Great! That's good to know. I don't have the bike built yet, but with the moustache bars on there, I can duplicate my mtb bar-end position, and its a very comfortable, and controllable position for me.

    Now, I'm concerned about what brake levers and shifters to use with them.

  4. #4
    m_s
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    I think bar-ends and any aero levers work best. I rode some setup with STIs and it was super akward to shift

  5. #5
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    I think thumbshifters would work well, but you'd have to be careful about clamp size?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by m_s
    I think bar-ends and any aero levers work best. I rode some setup with STIs and it was super akward to shift
    The lowest section of traditionnal drop bar help shouldering the bike. Isn't it aukward with moustache or flat bars / bullhorns ? How do you do it ?


  7. #7
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    After you get the higher/shorter stem figured out the ride is not bad. I never got used to the funny angle of the brake levers and have wrist issues riding on the tops or 0n the hoods. In the drops I am ok, but in cross I tend to sit up to suck more air into my lungs spending most of the time on the tops or on the hoods..
    They are a bit wider so in crowded courses, tight singletrack with branches jumping out at you, and up against the barriers/flaging on the course you need to give a bit more room.
    I really like the way you can get low and wide for scary greasy desents. The steering control is better than on drop bars.
    The Salsa Bell laps are sort of a compromise as they have features of both but not as extream on either style. I messed with the stash bars a couple years for cross (I do mostly SS class) and still have them on a grocery getter bike, but all my cross bikes (geared and SS) are drop bars now.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by T0mi
    The lowest section of traditionnal drop bar help shouldering the bike. Isn't it aukward with moustache or flat bars / bullhorns ? How do you do it ?
    If you absolutely can't reach the grip from under the downtube, try reaching around the headtube. (Which, ironically enough, is what she said.) Or just grab the stem. If the main triangle's big enough it's workable one way or another.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pretender
    If you absolutely can't reach the grip from under the downtube, try reaching around the headtube. (Which, ironically enough, is what she said.) Or just grab the stem. If the main triangle's big enough it's workable one way or another.
    I would find it a lot less comfy/stable.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by T0mi
    I would find it a lot less comfy/stable.
    Um...OK. And?

  11. #11
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    I think I'm just gonna try a shallow bend drop bar for now and see how it rides. my bike is gonna look wierd enough without having the moustache bar on there, and I don't want to run bar end shifters. Its got a long, low top tube, and 44cm shallow drop bars.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pretender
    Um...OK. And?
    And the original question was :

    Is there any problem trying to use moustache handlebars for cyclocross? Just giving it a thought, and wondered if there would be unforseen problems. They would suit me well if I could use them.

    I'm just giving my own thoughts. If you don't like them, don't play the dumbass and ignore them.

  13. #13
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    Talking On-One mungo

    I got some on-one Mungo bars, I have found them fine running them at the same position as i had run drop bars. (the same height at the stem).

    There have a small drop (about 50-60mm) from the clamp height to the outside "flat" section and i have found that angling this a bit down helped with the lever placement and comfort.

    Not being that flexible atm this has flet pretty comfortable and very controlled. I have also used these on my old SS mtb and fount i a great position and gave good control as well.

    the main different is that using drops I run a 110 to 120mm 6 degree rise stem, with these i run an 80mm stem with 6 degrees rise. This way it feel the same to me as riding on the hoods.


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