Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    22

    cross levers, necessary?

    what's the general consensus on in-line levers these days. once you got 'em, never go back? or just an unused hinderance on the bars?

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,134
    These days they are generally considered a bit dorky and unPRO, but that shouldn't discourage you from trying them. A lot of it depends on your riding style; some people never leave the hoods, so obviously they wouldn't use the top-mounts, while other people use all parts of the bars, including the tops. A lot also depends on practicing using them.

    There are usually two to three spots per lap where they really come in handy. Specifically, they allow you to keep your weight further back than any other braking position.

  3. #3
    World's 1st Anal-rapist
    Reputation: Magsdad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    1,147

    Take a bike with them out for an extended period of time.

    Personally, I don't care what I look like when I ride or what is or is not pro. Some people use them (include pros) some don't. Like Pretender stated, I use all of the bars, including that particular area of the bars, so I don't go with them on my Ridley.

    To me (whether this is right or wrong), interrupting the brakes from end to end would equate power loss, but I can't prove that. So its up to you.

    Good luck on your decision.
    Oh, I've been in the film business for a while, but I just can't seem to get one in the can.

    O-kay, who'd like a banger in the mouth? Right, I forgot, here in the States, you call it a *sausage* in the mouth.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: arctic hawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    357
    I have them on 1 bike & not the other. The bike I do have them on is more of a full time commuter & part time racer. It works well on the commuter to ride a bit taller in traffic.

    On the non equipped bike, I miss it every so often on steep down hills / technical trails during cross but that's about really it. Bike 2 also handles double duty for duathlons where the top mount is useless.
    Me on running at RunningMania.com http://www.runningmania.com/forum/vi...15813&start=50

    In support of injured Canadian Forces soldiers, please donate generously to Soldier On! http://www.cfpsa.com/Splashpages/SoldierOn/
    Proud supporter of local shops!

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,134
    Quote Originally Posted by Magsdad
    To me (whether this is right or wrong), interrupting the brakes from end to end would equate power loss, but I can't prove that.
    If you install them correctly, all you are doing is removing a short section of housing from the cable run. So there should be no extra friction.

    The braking feel you get from the top-mounts (versus the road levers) will be a little different, but I wager you get more practical braking "power" from the top-mounts than you do from the hoods.

    You do have to be somewhat careful when routing the cable housing, because the top-mounts work by pushing housing, not by pulling cable. It can be a little tricky with a front brake hanger, you probably want to run the cable over and around the bars and stem (but you might want to do that even without top-mounts).

  6. #6
    World's 1st Anal-rapist
    Reputation: Magsdad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    1,147

    See, I learn something every day!

    I have never really looked into them that much, as my hands are unusually large, so the middle of the bar area is very useful to me, almost more so than the drops. I didn't know how they actuated. Cool.
    Oh, I've been in the film business for a while, but I just can't seem to get one in the can.

    O-kay, who'd like a banger in the mouth? Right, I forgot, here in the States, you call it a *sausage* in the mouth.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    22
    good points. i'm building up my first cx bike, more of an all-arounder. i did spend a bit extra on good brakes (avid shorty ulitmates, good price if you price match @bikeman.com with an iccylesusa price, btw). any more input on performance with interrupted brake housing, and lever feel with the top mounts?

    i have seen that cable routing, up and behind. how do you think that'll work with a tektro headset mounted cable hanger (one of the longer drop ones) and in-line levers?

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    22
    oh, and does a 31.8 bar absolutely require a 31.8 clamp, or can they be mounted further outboard with a 25.4/26 clamp?

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,134
    I prefer mounting them close to the stem, like Adam Craig does:
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/...nced-sl/148953

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: FTMD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    284
    I love them. All of our dirt/gravel rides include some sketchy downhills and singletrack. I couldn't imagine riding some of that without them. My friends get by, but all complain of hand/forearm cramping afterward. I hope of my road bike and instinctively reach for them too.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    449
    Personal preference IMO. I mostly see them being used by the MTB racer types out there. One interesting observation I have made is that in Europe may of the top women racers use them: KfC, Van Den Brand and Kupfernagle come to mind. Not sure why but I cannot think of any men racing in Europe who use them.

    I had them on my last bike and found them useful. Don't have them on the new bike and don't miss them. Go figure.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    213
    Quote Originally Posted by cjn1014
    oh, and does a 31.8 bar absolutely require a 31.8 clamp, or can they be mounted further outboard with a 25.4/26 clamp?
    I think it depends on how wide the bulge is on your OS handlebar. It also depends on how wide your handlebars are. I am small and use 40cm wide bars and am basically forced to mount the cross levers near the stem. Otherwise, the ends of the cross levers are too far outboard.

    One disadvantage of mounting the cross levers close together is the lower housing has an even tighter route to the front brake hanger.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,134
    FWIW Bart Wellens used them at Zeddam 2006, Simunek did not (@1:23), nor did Nys (@2:00). Then again, neither did Vervecken.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,308
    As a mtber I use them mostly on down hills.....just more comfy for me vs the hoods.

  15. #15
    Not Banned
    Reputation: atpjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    42,259
    I like having the option
    kind of better to have them and not need them then need them and not have them
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by cjn1014
    what's the general consensus on in-line levers these days. once you got 'em, never go back? or just an unused hinderance on the bars?
    Depends on how you size your bike. I set-up my cross and road bikes exactly the same which is a 56 and I'm 5'10". We have a lot of hilly terrain and riding on the hoods limits my rearward weight shift. Hence, in-lines are important to me and I use them all of the time. Others that are 6' tall might race a 54 and won't need them. So the question is do you need the additional rear weight shift afforded by cross levers? dave

  17. #17
    Student of cycling
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    97
    I had them during the 2009 season but didn't use them much (I don't ride on the tops of the bar). I removed them for 2010 and didn't miss them at all. If I was setting my bike up as a trail bike, then I would have them.
    Dirt is for racing, the road is just for getting there.

  18. #18
    Iohannes fac totum
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,146
    I don't have them and don't have any problems descending any singletrack without them either. It's a lot of personal preference IMO and I do come from a MTB background. I almost always descend from the drops on my CX bike. It's just so relaxed and easy that way. I have never felt the need for them when CX racing, and I haven't had any problems bunnhopping from the hoods. Wells likes to bunnhop from the flats, Powers from the hoods (I think).......It's all preference and bike set-up.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4
    I put them on my cross bike when they were cool. After they became uncool I took them off. I missed them and put them back of for two specific race reasons.

    With my right foot unclipped and to the left of the bike I feel more comfortable riding up to the barriers with my left hand on the handlebar flats and being able to scrub speed at the last moment. The other is one wheel at a time bunny hopping. I just find easier lifting the front wheel from the flat and again having access to braking at the last moment.

    I can do both techniques without the extra brakes but I like the option.
    Last edited by BRUCE BREITRICK; 01-21-2011 at 12:11 PM.

  20. #20
    You got any chocolate?
    Reputation: tg3895's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    98
    KFC looks very PRO to me and uses them. Go with what works best for you.

    Name:  compton-300x449.jpg
Views: 363
Size:  46.4 KB
    Tom G.
    Long Island, NY

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,055
    My bike came with them and I hated them. They took up some real estate I like to use for climbing, and when I descend on a road bike, I'm in the drops. I find on singletrack I'm usually on the hoods - don't like narrowing my grip at the time that I think I can use all the stability I can get. The bars on my 'cross bike are a bit higher than I put them on my road bike, so riding in the drops is a little more comfortable, and my weight's a little further back when I'm on the hoods. Now the only thing left to fix is to replace the handlebars with something with a bend shape I don't hate.

    I'd suggest that if you want the interrupter levers for something other than the narrower grip when braking on the way into a barrier, there's maybe something about your cockpit setup that could be better.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    97
    I used them for a few years but took them off and havent really missed them. I noticed that I only missed them when I was riding around in parking lots before my rides or pre/post race.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

EUROBIKE

Hot Deals

Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook