Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    24

    DT Swiss rr1.1 versus Mavic open pro?

    Hello,
    I am looking to build a wheel for cross.
    looking to spend around $75 dollars for each rim.
    I weigh 180 pounds and will be racing/riding in Colorado.
    DT Swiss rr1.1 and Mavic open pro are two likely candidates. Any advice?

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    296
    I highly recommend the open pro over the 1.1. The first time you try to put a tire on the 1.1 you'll understand why.

  3. #3
    Is not a clown car
    Reputation: unclefuzzy_ss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    2,366
    Never had trouble with my 1.1's. They're a great rim.

    Either will treat you very well. They will both build up to a super nice, strong wheel.
    Disclaimer: I sell ::Singulars:: and write a :blog:
    ::Pictures::

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    24
    I forgot to say I am going to try tubeless. I am pretty sure they are both compatible.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 32and3cross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    2,818
    just built up a 1.1 great rim

  6. #6
    D2D
    Reputation: MeLikeyBikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by gobes
    I highly recommend the open pro over the 1.1. The first time you try to put a tire on the 1.1 you'll understand why.
    My thumbs are still sore from mounting a tire on Tuesday.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: krisdrum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,216
    If going tubeless, my understanding is the Open Pros have a deeper center channel that needs a few extra layers to fill in, so you can get a good seal. So, a bit more effort on your part. CXMag did a nice series of articles on going tubeless. Much of the content is available on their website. Might be worth a read before opening the wallet.

    If spending $75 per rim, why not get something a bit lighter, like the Kinlin xr-270s or 300s? They can be had pretty easily in the $50-60 range online.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    450
    I've used both the Open Pro and the 1.1 over the years, and yes... the 1.1 sux when it's time to mount a road tire. I've never had any trouble mounting a cx tire, but if you're planning on using a tubeless specific tire, you may find the bead too tight for easy mounting. Why not just run Stan's rims? Makes everything easier.

  9. #9
    Not Banned
    Reputation: atpjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    41,966

    just go tubular

    why go to all the hassle of setting tubeless up and wind up with an inferior set up in comparison to Tubs?
    lotsa work, limited tire selection, stiffer sidewalls, higher psi and always the burp spectre
    call me a cynic but I fail to see the upside
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Bertrand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,158
    I've had 1.1s for three years and I love 'em. Strong, trouble-free, etc etc.

  11. #11
    Formosan Cyclocross
    Reputation: Dajianshan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,366
    I love my 1.1

    The Michelin Jets are hard to fit the first time... Muds go on easy. Conti GP 4000 are the hardest new tire to mount.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    450
    Quote Originally Posted by atpjunkie
    why go to all the hassle of setting tubeless up and wind up with an inferior set up in comparison to Tubs?
    lotsa work, limited tire selection, stiffer sidewalls, higher psi and always the burp spectre
    call me a cynic but I fail to see the upside
    I'm not sure everyone would agree that a tubeless tire setup would be inferior to a tubular tire setup. It depends on what aspects of the system you care most about.

    A set of good quality tubulars will set you back significantly more than a good set of tubeless tires. Plus, while you may not have as large a selection of tubeless tires to choose from, there are enough to choose from so that you can find a tire for every occasion. At least with a tubeless setup you can switch tires relatively easily, even at the race site, something you can NOT do with tubulars unless you have multiple wheelsets.

    I'd go so far as to say that with the right wheelset you could be more than adequately prepared for any conditions imaginable with two readily available sets of tires, Stans Ravens or Hutchinson Pirahnas for all around riding, and Hutchinson Bulldogs for muddier conditions.

  13. #13
    veldrijder
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by yo mamma
    I'm not sure everyone would agree that a tubeless tire setup would be inferior to a tubular tire setup. It depends on what aspects of the system you care most about.
    Yeah, you know, if performance has nothing to do with your priorities then it really doesn't matter

  14. #14
    raging results nerd
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    925
    [removed something dumb about the OP not wanting tubeless]

    Edit: Oh man I need to read slower next time.

    And yeah, tubeless is better than tubulars as long as you're not interested in performance. And if you're not interested in performance, just stick with clinchers with tubes.
    Last edited by colinr; 08-21-2009 at 11:11 AM.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: krisdrum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,216
    Quote Originally Posted by yo mamma
    I'm not sure everyone would agree that a tubeless tire setup would be inferior to a tubular tire setup. It depends on what aspects of the system you care most about.

    A set of good quality tubulars will set you back significantly more than a good set of tubeless tires. Plus, while you may not have as large a selection of tubeless tires to choose from, there are enough to choose from so that you can find a tire for every occasion. At least with a tubeless setup you can switch tires relatively easily, even at the race site, something you can NOT do with tubulars unless you have multiple wheelsets.

    I'd go so far as to say that with the right wheelset you could be more than adequately prepared for any conditions imaginable with two readily available sets of tires, Stans Ravens or Hutchinson Pirahnas for all around riding, and Hutchinson Bulldogs for muddier conditions.
    Nevermind that there has been significant testing with "non-tubeless" tires in a tubeless set-up with more than satisfactory results. And, worst case scenario, you can throw a tube in there and be back up and riding. Not ideal, but workable.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: krisdrum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,216
    Quote Originally Posted by robcr125
    I forgot to say I am going to try tubeless. I am pretty sure they are both compatible.
    Actually, the OP did mention considering tubeless as an option.

  17. #17
    raging results nerd
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    925
    Quote Originally Posted by krisdrum
    Actually, the OP did mention considering tubeless as an option.
    @#$%#@$% reading too fast

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: krisdrum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,216
    Not to derail this thread too much, but can the tubie lovers talk more about the "lack of performance" offered by tubeless set-ups? There seems to be some pretty strong cases for their use in my research. I do see some of the potential risks (all the systems have some sort of downside). Is the lack of performance perception coming from the potential for burping? It seems you would be able to run nearly identical low pressure tubie or tubeless for the same sized rider.

  19. #19
    raging results nerd
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    925
    Quote Originally Posted by krisdrum
    Not to derail this thread too much, but can the tubie lovers talk more about the "lack of performance" offered by tubeless set-ups? There seems to be some pretty strong cases for their use in my research. I do see some of the potential risks (all the systems have some sort of downside). Is the lack of performance perception coming from the potential for burping? It seems you would be able to run nearly identical low pressure tubie or tubeless for the same sized rider.
    Another factor is sidewall suppleness. Makes a non-trivial difference in how the tire conforms to the terrain and provides traction. A rubber sidewall (tubless or Tufo) can't compete with something like a cotton-sidewalled Dugast (but it will last a lot longer!). So even if you can run a tubeless at the same psi, you would get better traction from the tubular.

    Moreover, I'm not sure what research you've been doing, but I've never seen it suggested that you can run a tubeless cx setup at 25psi or lower, something you can do with tubies.

    I almost never go over 30 psi with my tubies and didn't flat once last year, is anyone out there running a 28psi tubeless all season without problems? Maybe I'm ignorant of what tubeless can do these days.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: krisdrum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,216
    Quote Originally Posted by colinr
    Another factor is sidewall suppleness. Makes a non-trivial difference in how the tire conforms to the terrain and provides traction. A rubber sidewall (tubless or Tufo) can't compete with something like a cotton-sidewalled Dugast (but it will last a lot longer!). So even if you can run a tubeless at the same psi, you would get better traction from the tubular.

    Moreover, I'm not sure what research you've been doing, but I've never seen it suggested that you can run a tubeless cx setup at 25psi or lower, something you can do with tubies.

    I almost never go over 30 psi with my tubies and didn't flat once last year, is anyone out there running a 28psi tubeless all season without problems? Maybe I'm ignorant of what tubeless can do these days.
    Great insight, thanks Colin. I was thinking more in the 30psi range. Didn't think about going below that. Not sure I've seen anything about super low pressures like your 25. I see your point. So, tubeless can potentially bridge the gap between "no performance" clinchers and "pure performance" tubies with some advantages, but also some risks. Kind of a poor man's tubie, sorta. Maybe?

  21. #21
    raging results nerd
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    925
    Quote Originally Posted by krisdrum
    Great insight, thanks Colin. I was thinking more in the 30psi range. Didn't think about going below that. Not sure I've seen anything about super low pressures like your 25. I see your point. So, tubeless can potentially bridge the gap between "no performance" clinchers and "pure performance" tubies with some advantages, but also some risks. Kind of a poor man's tubie, sorta. Maybe?
    Tubeless is definitely the poor man's tubular, depending on how reliable your setup is. Prior to going tubular I raced Mud2 clinchers at 35 psi for two seasons without a flat, so I don't see a low-30 psi tubeless setup as much of a performance improvement, especially if it hurts your reliability.

    One case where tubeless is a winner is out West, the land of goathead thorns, because you can run stan's sealant inside to plug the little holes they cause. But then again, you can put stans in your tubie.

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    608
    Hmmm, we really need to have some sort of tubeless vs. tubular sticky. There's stuff scattered all over the internet but it would be nice to have it all in one spot. I'm still running tubes and clinchers at high psi because I don't want to flat. I know my rides could improve if I made the switch to tubeless or tubular... guess I have more reading to do.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    450
    Quote Originally Posted by jmoote
    Yeah, you know, if performance has nothing to do with your priorities then it really doesn't matter
    Right, like you can tell the difference in blind testing...

  24. #24
    veldrijder
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    444
    If you can't then you're doing something wrong. The most commonly used clinchers for tubeless applications are ~120 tpi, whereas tubulars are 3-5 times that... so yeah, there's a bit of a difference. Hand spun cotton vs. some polymer cord covered in rubber - it should be pretty obvious.

  25. #25
    Not Banned
    Reputation: atpjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    41,966

    some folks don't get it

    Quote Originally Posted by jmoote
    If you can't then you're doing something wrong. The most commonly used clinchers for tubeless applications are ~120 tpi, whereas tubulars are 3-5 times that... so yeah, there's a bit of a difference. Hand spun cotton vs. some polymer cord covered in rubber - it should be pretty obvious.
    what makes a tubular so superior is the suppleness of the sidewalls
    you can take the tread off a Michelin Mud and make a phenom tubular out of it

    clinchers and tubeless cannot by design, ever be that supple
    you can't run that low of psi
    you'll never feel your entire mold to the surface you are riding over

    I'll say this again. Imagine all the sex you'd ever had was witha condom
    and I was saying, 'wait til you go without'
    it is the only analogy that comes close

    it costs less (you can find ised tub wheels cheap, check the forums here)
    it's lighter and rides better
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Hot Deals

Contest

Tour De France

Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook