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  1. #1
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    Ouzo Pro Cross...?

    Anyone see one of these yet or better yet own one?

    http://www.reynoldscomposites.com/OuzoProCross.asp

    e

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by escamillo
    Anyone see one of these yet or better yet own one?

    http://www.reynoldscomposites.com/OuzoProCross.asp

    e
    I was asking a few online retailers about availability and pricing and was told by one that talked to Reynolds that it wouldn't be available until "next cross season."

  3. #3
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    Bummer

    I'll see if I can come up with any more solid info.

    -e

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnichols959
    I was asking a few online retailers about availability and pricing and was told by one that talked to Reynolds that it wouldn't be available until "next cross season."
    i found the email and it was from bikeman.com - who were very helpful by the way.

    i'd be interested to know if you find more specific info. looks like a great fork.

  5. #5
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    OK here is the deal on the ouzo pro cross fork. Reynolds said they won't be available until june or july, most likely this means the end of august.

    -e

  6. #6
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    any idea how much? I still think Sibex Ti is better choice unless Ouzo is priced well.

  7. #7
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    The guys at the shop seemed to think when it did come out it would be cheaper than the true temper Q cross fork, ie still spendy. So I'm getting the Q fork, I considered the sibex but like the way the Q rides. I think the Ti fork would be a little noodly under my 185 lbs.

    -e

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=escamillo]The guys at the shop seemed to think when it did come out it would be cheaper than the true temper Q cross fork, ie still spendy. So I'm getting the Q fork, I considered the sibex but like the way the Q rides. I think the Ti fork would be a little noodly under my 185 lbs.

    Gully raced them all season and he's pretty big. From what I've read most Carbon cx forks have a life of a season or 2 at the most. hard to justify the $$$$. I'm 230 so am not in the market, maybe a custom steel fork someday.

  9. #9
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    From what I've read most Carbon cx forks have a life of a season or 2 at the most.


    I haven't heard that one. Where did you come across that info. With the 10 or so races a year I do and the thursday practice I wouldn't consider myself hard on equipment but it is certainly food for thought. However I'm going to use it in a few local crits for kicks, also since I sold the road bike.

    Thanks,

    -e

  10. #10
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    My biggest reservation...

    of any of the higher end carbon cross forks is the carbon stearer, I suppose if the only time you use your cross bike is for racing only and not a regular training tool during other parts of the year then it probably doesn't matter, but if the cross bike gets enough use then I think the added weight of an alloy stearer or the Sibex fork for lightweight seem like better options.

  11. #11
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    My concern with the carbon/alloy forks is the bonding. I have already seen this on some of the older road forks with alloy steerer's. I figured the all carbon would last longer barring an impact crash on the front end. The bonding to like material being stronger than a cabon to alloy, at least in my muddled thinking.

    I would say that most of my training will be done on this bike with this fork do you really think that all those carbon options out there only have a two year life span? If so take note e-bay shoppers.

    -e

  12. #12
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    Not so much a matter of lifespan...

    more a matter of lifespan influenced by environment. In other words, if you've got a carbon fork on a road bike, more than likely the worst thing in it's life is going to be the occasional pothole or something similar, jarring, but only on an irregular basis with smooth road amounting to most of it's daily use. On the other hand, a cross fork by it's very nature is going to be expected to deal with much more uneven terrain on a regular basis, providing a jarring motion to the fork in general as well as a shearing jolt to the stearing tube transmitted through the headset. That's why I would lean towards the alloy stearer on a budget or the Sibex fork if not...leave the all carbon feather weights to the guys who get paid to race.

  13. #13
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    I would like to point out that cross forks, all cross forks (at least the good ones) are built for more than just the occasional pot hole that their brothers on the road encounter. Where do you think all that extra weight is going? Not the brake posts. However you have given food for thought and I'll ask True Temper their thoughts on the matter. I'll post what ever they have to say when and "IF" they respond. The sibex is back in the running.

    e

  14. #14
    ex pro grad student
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    I am very interested in a Sibex Ti or a Carbon fork, but definitely have the same concerns as all of you. That's why I am currently still sticking with steel. At least it can be bent back if you take a serious digger (evidence of that).

    How does the Sibex Ti fork handle on the road?

    Any one know the life of a carbon seat post in relation to cross?
    You won't eat our meat but you glue with our feet.

  15. #15
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    The two year lifespan thing is rubbish. Have yet to see a fork that came with that recommendation. Of course it all depends on the rider and their weight, skill and stength.

    As for the durability of crabon/aluminum forks, it varies. It is true an all carbon fork will be stronger but this doesn't mean that a carbon/aluminum fork can't be strong enough for real world use. Most of my team use Wound-Up forks which have carbon legs bonded to an aluminum crown which in turn is bonded to a carbon reinforced aluminum steer. They're probably the strongest non-steel cross forks I've seen. They're definitely the nicest riding cross fork I've tried regardless of material.

    As for durability, the Wound-Up fork has held up great and we've got some really big, strong riders (one is a track sprinter) I've also heard positive feedback from riders/teams running the True Temper fork.

  16. #16
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    good to have your opinion fly. as a guy whose been a wrench and deeply involved in the machinations of cx it's good to read your thoughts. I don't remember where I read they 2 year thing, it may have been in this forum about a month or so ago.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyweight
    As for durability, the Wound-Up fork has held up great and we've got some really big, strong riders (one is a track sprinter) I've also heard positive feedback from riders/teams running the True Temper fork.
    That's great to hear some real feed back on these forks. Anyone else?

  18. #18
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    reply from True Temper

    I recieved a prompt note regarding longevity from True Temper. Here you go:

    "Actually it is just the opposite. All metals have what is known as a
    fatigue life. This means that the metal loses some degree of strength
    over time and stress. Carbon has no fatigue life. A properly cared for
    carbon component can last for ever. Obviously, crashes, rocks, etc that
    typically occur in a cross ride are uncontrolled and can damage the
    structure of the fork. Therefore, we recommend that you inspect your
    bike and all the components before each ride." TT

    Anyone else have anything to add to this?

    -e

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