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  1. #1
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    Exclamation Stan's No Tubes?

    Thinking of upgrading to Stan's. Right now, I have good ol' tubes and a pair of Bulldogs. Anyone have luck with Stan's? Reasons to stay away? I'm incompetent with my hands, so if Stan's gets tricky, I'd stay away. But I'd definitely have a shop hook it up. Thanks for ANY info...

  2. #2
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    it works fine. i like bontrager super juice personally but it depends on where you live and the riding you do(lots of goat heads, etc.). if you live in a really dry climate (new mexico) then the stans dries quickly and balls up. you can find the custom mixtures that people make on here too

  3. #3
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    I use it w/ bulldogs on roval pave wheels with the rubber strips that come with the package. If I remember right I do not have a strip underneath. I did not use the soap water but did use compressed air, they leaked around the bead for a day then seal up.

    They will burp off air for me below about 45 psi, so they are less useful for racing, but I find them a reliable training tire and an OK backup wheel.

    I also use the stans in tubular tires, it's great for that application, use a couple few tablespoons right into the valve, seals up some pretty big slashes

  4. #4
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    I'm a big Stan's fan...but

    I couldn't get them to seal up with my fav cross tires.- WTB Interwolf's 700x38. My rim is a Sun ringle. That combo just didn't work. the tires would seem to seal up, but go flat after a couple of days. I'll try again later, but needed the bike for a destination race, and just couldn't trust it. I've run Stans for years on my mtb and swear by it.

    I'm gonna try it with my winter tires-Kenda Kross supreme's and see if it's any better.

    Every tire/rim combo offers different challenges.good luck!

  5. #5
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    I'm going to try True Goo tubes first. Anyone have experience with them?

    Thanks for your replies!

  6. #6
    TWD
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterThanAliens
    I'm going to try True Goo tubes first. Anyone have experience with them?

    Thanks for your replies!
    No need for fancy sealed tubes. You can buy the sealant (Stan's, homebrew...whatever) and some tubes with removable valve cores (Q-tubes etc..) and fix up a whole bunch of tubes.

    The large bottle of Stan's came with a syringe and measuring cup which is nice for adding in through the valve stem.

    I ran Stan'sed tubes all last cross season without any flats during races. Maybe one during training. Found one tube at end of season with 3 or 4 holes that the sealant had sealed up.

    HOWEVER....the sealant won't stop a pinch flat, so still not as good as tubeless or tubular.
    All in all, at the end of the day, it is what it is....just sayin'

  7. #7
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    Tubeless Cross

    I've ran tubeless the last two cross seasons, and I have no reasons to go back to tubes. I've used Stan rim strips, ghetto homemade strips, and now just the rim tape method from Stan and Specialized. I've used Specialized tires, Ritchey, and now running the Hutch TNT (tube/no tube, called tubeless ready usually) cross tires. I've found no difference in the tubeless aspect of performance with either of these tires.
    Our courses, here in NM, are sometimes filled with non-cross type hazards, and I've burped ocaissionally on fist sized rocks and curbs. Those hits could easily have resulted in pinch flats with tubes. Some of our races cause a constant spitting of Stangoo from the tires as the "goathead" is the only indegenous species. So I have to add fresh Stangoo often.
    The tires that are the most dificult to mount, will work the best in tubeless form. The TNT's are supposedly different from standard tires, but I'm not convinced (except for the Hutch road tubeless which I use and am happy with). On the mtb side of tires, the TNT designation is supposed to mean something also, but I'm convinced it's a marketing ploy.

    Be patient with the installation, and always ride the wheels a bit immediately after the conversion.

    C Cow

  8. #8
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    I love my set of Stan's wheels. They are stiff and incredibly light. I use the Raven tire on the front and the Michelin Jet tire on the rear. I have not had any problems.
    From Bicycles
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Englehardt
    I love my set of Stan's wheels. They are stiff and incredibly light. I use the Raven tire on the front and the Michelin Jet tire on the rear. I have not had any problems.
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    Sweet ride. Is this your main form of transportation to and from the races?...
    I may be short but I sure am skinny.

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