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  1. #1
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    Considering 1st Century: Is Belt Drive, 8 Speed Trek Soho Do-able?

    I am considering completing a century ride in the near future and am interested in your thoughts on riding my Trek Soho "commuter" bike. It is a belt drive, flat bar, internal 8 speed that is fairly heavy, but it is what I use for my training rides.

    I am currently up to 40 miles averaging 15.5mph, but getting better everyday. I know its not a conventional bike to ride a century, but it is all I have for now and it is very comfortable, no (low) maintenance and obviously, not very efficient.

    Thank you for your feedback.

  2. #2
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    How much climbing do you expect? How does that compare to your current route?

  3. #3
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    Reputation: stover's Avatar
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    Depends on the route your century is. people do centuries on single speeds so your not at a disadvantage.

  4. #4
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    I will be looking for a relatively flat century ride... I have not scheduled one yet. My current training route is pretty flat with some slight rolling hills. To be more specific, my question was really concerning the efficiency (or lack there of) of a belt driven commuter bike. I would guess its 25% less efficient than a conventional road bike. So really, I would actually be doing the equivalent of a 125 mile ride compared to all the slackers on true road bikes

  5. #5
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    I say go for it!! choose a loop with bail outs in case you feel like crapola mid-ride or whatever (public transit is a good bail out) and that has less climbing, more rest-stops (cafe`s or wherever you could stop and get water at least) and bonus points if your somewhat sheltered from the wind that day (country road lined by thick trees -vs- country road without trees) and have fun! bring lotsa water, some snacks (power bars or plain ol granola bars) maybe some powdered drink mix so alternate `tween water n taste

    other than that... ride tall.. rider well.. and enjoy the ride
    gearring is everything... and if everything fails.. think one word... `Diesel`

  6. #6
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    Reputation: WaynefromOrlando's Avatar
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    I have seen hybrids out on the metric century rides, but not on the Century rides, probably because of the hills where I have ridden. If the Century was flat, I don't think the Soho would be out of the question. Heck, some guy on a 45 lb steel single speed rode in the Horrible Hundred race with tons of hills last year, so you would probably do okay on the flats. Of course the guy who did the HH on the single was a monster, so unless you're in that category, I would not try anything with lots of bumps.
    As long as people believe in absurdities they will continue to commit atrocities. Voltaire

    A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned - this is the sum of good government. Thomas Jefferson

  7. #7
    la dolce vita
    Reputation: Mootsie's Avatar
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    My wife did a century on a fixed gear, 48 x 17. I have also seen a guy do the Triple By Pass on an old Schwinn Sting Ray 5 speed so I think you have it pretty comfy by comparison.
    insert witty comment here

  8. #8
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    It should be fine. Sure, it's heavier than a performance road bike. But, you aren't racing. As long as it's geared appropriately for the course, go for it. If the weight worries you, remove the rack and fenders (assuming you're on a Soho DLX, which appears to come with them).

    Also, you could swap a set of performance tires - they'll roll a bit faster than the heavier urban tires that came on the bike. Your LBS can help you pick something.

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