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  1. #1
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    Hotter than Hell 100

    anybody here done this one/ planning on doing it this year?

    Hotter'N Hell Hundred

    I wanted to do it when I turned 30 but a bunch of home improvements sidetracked my training. All my riding partners have already done it and sworn they will never do it again. If there is a group doing it this year maybe I might be tempted to train up for it this summer.

  2. #2
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    I did it a couple times years ago, and I'm sure there are many on the RBR forums who have also.

    HTHH is as much about just dealing with the conditions as it is about riding the bike. The heat, poor road surfaces, wind, etc., all have to be coped with.

    Most people I know who have ridden it were like me -- they just wanted to scratch it off the list and say, "yeah, I did that one".
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustTooBig View Post
    ............
    HTHH is as much about just dealing with the conditions as it is about riding the bike. The heat, poor road surfaces, wind, etc., all have to be coped with.

    Most people I know who have ridden it were like me -- they just wanted to scratch it off the list and say, "yeah, I did that one".
    That's me. I rode it back in the late '80's when the start finish was at the stadium and we at least finished with the wind. They've long since changed the route so you likely have a headwind at the end.
    I can ride in the heat and wind at home. No need to go to a lot of trouble to do that anywhere else.
    I will say the folks in WF were always super friendly and made cyclists feel welcome. I enjoyed the expo (or whatever they called it) on the day before and always picked up a few bargains.
    Some of my friends still go and have fun riding the metric century together. You still get the flavor of the event without cooking yourself.

  4. #4
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    Hotter than Hell 100

    I've done it every year but once since '05. The heat sucks but if you've been training in some heat it's not so bad. Roads can suck - a few years ago they put new chipseal on a lot of the course and it was miserable.

    But it's a relatively flat course so only wind is the big thing to deal with. It's run VERY well and is a lot of fun. Even if you only do it once its worth doing IMO.

  5. #5
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    I did the HHH in 2012. Probably wont do it again. It's fun to say you have ridden with 14000 other riders but the course is really unattractive and the wind last year was horrible, especially the last 20.

  6. #6
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    I did it last year and am planning to do it again this year. I echo the sentiments from above that the roads and wind were terrible last year, the last 20 miles into the wind were brutal.

    I love in Houston and have family that lives in WF so I pretty much do it every year, but I agree that it is good to do it once to say you did it, but unless you live close by I would not do it again.

  7. #7
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    BTDT.

    townsfolk were superb...we dumbly just drove there and just expected to find lodging. uh, no, missed getting available space by only 6 months or so.

    we ran into a guy who knew a guy whose parents would let some people have floor space for the evening...baddabing! the nice lady of the house even fixed us some breakfast at zero-dark-thirty.

    excellent sag and support services...goodie stop every 10 miles...I liked the horse troughs filled with ice water and little towels to put around your neck.

    heard the medical support was good...even tho there was a fatality the year I did it. typical out-of-shape older guy with no base miles trying to log a century...durr, Darwin effect.

    wind was whipping, but was in large pacelines for 95% of the ride.

    bestest was the pvc pipe 'jungle gym' after the finish line that was hooked to a firetruck...you could go inside it and get sprayed down. temp was 104F when we rolled in, felt really good.
    eff all y'all...

  8. #8
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    I never remember to get lodging in time. I'm going to do the Enchanted Circle Century in Red River, NM instead.
    Tis the season for all of us not hard enough to play to belittle those not hard enough to win. We are a funny lot. - dave @ November Bicycles

  9. #9
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    I lived in Wichita falls, TX---location of hotter n hell----it's straight desert and tumbleweed. Make sure you hydrate yourself----you can check out this site for the best you can bring to get you through Hell www.tourcycling.com

  10. #10
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    I rode it every year from 1978 (first year?) until 1990 when I moved to Hong Kong. At the time I lived in Denton so we would just drive up early in the morning

    One of the most memorial moments for me was seeing some guy on one of the old screwed and glued Vitus or Alan frames. The head tube had separated from the top and down tube. (He hadn't crashed until the tubes separated) I felt bad for him but it stopped me from wanting one of those frames.

    The health and sag are first rate. They instituted a time check at one point, maybe they still do to remove struggling riders from the course before they died.

    The first bike I completed the HTH on was a vintage 1968 Dawes Galaxy with an 18 speed 3X6 setup of a Cyclo Tourist crank and Huret Duopar derailleurs. The bike had 32mm wide cotton cord tubulars. I took the fenders and racks off to lighten it up a bit for the ride. It had three bottle mounts and I carried two other water bottles in a jersey pocket. I wish I still had that bike!
    Fai Mao
    A Proud Retrogrouch

  11. #11
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    I've done it many times living in Dallas... It has always amazed me how such a windswept, hot and barren landscape draws thousands of riders each year..

    They do a great job of promotion and organization so now some years later it is still going strong. And they even listen to the riders and they are changing the route back after last years mistake.

    Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate... If you are trained you can do a fast century even with heat and wind. It is cool to see that many riders in one place of all shapes and sizes and a great expo, but Friday before the ride it is too crowded to really see everything. Plan to shop/look on Thursday or early Friday and watch the crits on Friday evening before getting a good nights rest. You can find lodging with local residents, camp, YMCA or pay for a hotel but they do jack up the prices.
    “You don't suffer, kill yourself and take the risks I take just for money. I love bike racing.” .....Greg Lemond

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalruns View Post
    Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate... .
    Did you ride one of the years that high school cheerleaders in the town of Burke-Burnett were doing the "Hydrate-Hydrate-Hydrate- Now" cheer and the fire department there had the water cannon setup to mist about 1/2 a city block?
    Fai Mao
    A Proud Retrogrouch

  13. #13
    ulu
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    I'm also thinking of entering. I moved to Ft Worth fm San Diego about a month ago, and I ride 25-30 miles 3 times per week. I'm wondering also if I am ready for it. Rest stops are every 10 miles, so is it really that hard?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ulu View Post
    I'm also thinking of entering. I moved to Ft Worth fm San Diego about a month ago, and I ride 25-30 miles 3 times per week. I'm wondering also if I am ready for it. Rest stops are every 10 miles, so is it really that hard?
    Try 60 one day this weekend. If you can do that, it's a maybe.
    Last edited by skinewmexico; 07-12-2013 at 06:33 AM.
    Tis the season for all of us not hard enough to play to belittle those not hard enough to win. We are a funny lot. - dave @ November Bicycles

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ulu View Post
    I'm also thinking of entering. I moved to Ft Worth fm San Diego about a month ago, and I ride 25-30 miles 3 times per week. I'm wondering also if I am ready for it. Rest stops are every 10 miles, so is it really that hard?
    They do have rest stops every 10 miles and neutral sag. The ride organization is first rate, possibly the best for any ride of this type I've ever seen

    The issue is the wind. It used to be that coaches would say that riding against the wind is the same as riding up a hill but I disagree. I grew up in that area and could ride against the wind but have never been a good climber Especially in a very hot - dry climate the wind is a total beast and the wind on that ride can be brutal. You don't even sweat when it that hot and dry and the wind does not cool you down. Also the temperatures are different from other places in the US that don't have that Continental weather pattern rather than the maritime pattern in California. While the high may be 105 and you say "Gee I am used to riding in 98 in California so what's the big deal?" you need to remember it will hit 100 degrees by 9:30 in the morning so it is hotter for a much longer part of the day. People die on this ride. because they don't realize how hot they are.

    Be careful

    Some perhaps overly simplistic advice for the HTH100:

    1. If you do the ride then take it as an adventure, pace yourself. The object is to finish not set a speed record. If your normal average speed is 17 - 20 mph then plan on riding 13-15 MPH and enjoying the ride. If you know how to look at it,the prairie is really pretty if not so obviously pretty as mountains or coastlines so enjoy the view. I never understood line from the song America the Beautiful about "amber waves of grain" until I saw the huge fields of wheat and millet that grow on the great plains. You can also contemplate what this area would have looked like before so many people moved there (This is sarcasm as the area is really empty)

    2. Wear a lightweight long sleeve jersey or one of those long sleeve very light wool t-shirts. A cycling cap under the helmet acts a sweat band and keeps your head from getting sunburned. You'll be out in the sun for hours. Even SPF 80 sunscreen doesn't work as well as a light long sleeve shirt and a cap

    3. Most bikes have 2 water-bottle cages. I'd look into getting one of the mounts that Ti-athletes use that mount two behind the saddle so I could carry 4 bottles. Two of them should be full of water not recovery drink because you can use the water to keep your jersey wet and thus cooler. Soaking the front of your jersey is a great way to cool down.

    4. I found that a set of aero clip-on bars really helped on the first half of the course which is against the wind and a constant - almost imperceptible - climb up the cap-rock.

    5. Use pedals and shoes you can walk in. If you get a cramp in a leg you may need to walk about a bit to work it out
    Last edited by Fai Mao; 07-14-2013 at 04:34 PM.
    Fai Mao
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  16. #16
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    Had a great time the last few years there, but not in the schedule this year.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ulu View Post
    I'm also thinking of entering. I moved to Ft Worth fm San Diego about a month ago, and I ride 25-30 miles 3 times per week. I'm wondering also if I am ready for it. Rest stops are every 10 miles, so is it really that hard?
    Do some of the other rally's coming up, nearly one every weekend.. The Goatneck is in a couple of weeks and is a great rally.. The longest distance is 70 with lots of hills. This rally will have a big turn out with at least a couple of thousand so you will get the feel of riding with others.. See how you feel, how you do.

    The good thing about the HH is too there is lots of support and if your not at hells gate at the cut off they will stop you... This is good so people don't get in over their heads.. And you for sure could do any of the shorter distances at the HH.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fai Mao View Post
    You don't even sweat when it that hot and dry and the wind does not cool you down.

    Two of them should be full of water not recovery drink because you can use the water to keep your jersey wet and thus cooler. Soaking the front of your jersey is a great way to cool down.
    While this will vary from rider to rider, I think this would be a detriment for many as unlike the desert climate with relatively low humidity, this area of Texas suffers very high humidity which when coupled with the hot, blast-furnace like winds, typically do not allow for adequate evaporation. In such cases, depending on the composition of the cycling garment, water soaked jersey and bibs may actually increase heat retention which possibly could aid in accelerating the onset of heat exhaustion/stroke.

    That said, the wife and I have ridden the HHH and I have raced the USCF events numerous times over the past 20-years but our last was several years back when a cold-front blew in the night before and heavy rains cooled things off to the point we actually were considering arm warmers for the for the morning depart. With the cooler temps and light winds, we easily managed a 5-hour century that year and with temps just hitting the 75-degrees mark, it made it pretty easy to mark the HHH off the bucket list.
    Last edited by ms6073; 07-15-2013 at 07:36 AM.
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  19. #19
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    Hotter than Hell 100

    Quote Originally Posted by ulu View Post
    I'm also thinking of entering. I moved to Ft Worth fm San Diego about a month ago, and I ride 25-30 miles 3 times per week. I'm wondering also if I am ready for it. Rest stops are every 10 miles, so is it really that hard?
    Probably. You still have a month of training to get a little more fitness.

    As others have said. I'd add a 100k ride or two and see how you do. Not sure what time of day you're riding, but starting your ride later in the mornings when it's starting to warm up can hel get your body used to riding in the heat.

    The goatneck next weekend would be a great test ride. If you can do the 70 mile goatneck, you can do the HHH. It's windy, but flat. Whereas the goatneck is hilly and windy.

  20. #20
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    Where is the Goatneck?
    Tis the season for all of us not hard enough to play to belittle those not hard enough to win. We are a funny lot. - dave @ November Bicycles

  21. #21
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    Hotter than Hell 100

    It's in cleburne, a little south of the metroplex.

    I like the goatneck a lot. It and the peach pedal are my two absolutely must do at any cost rides each year.

  22. #22
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    Bump to see if anyone else will be riding this year. This will be my first century so I am pretty excited about it. I don't care how hot it gets as long as the wind isn't too bad.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lonestar Light View Post
    Bump to see if anyone else will be riding this year. This will be my first century so I am pretty excited about it. I don't care how hot it gets as long as the wind isn't too bad.
    Pardon the vile pun.

    You picked a Hell of a first century ride. That is a tough one! It is so dry as well as hot that you don't realize how hot you are because you don't realize how much you are sweating so you should care how how hot it gets.

    Just stay hydrated, wear a light color long sleeve jersey or shirt to keep the sun off your arms and use a lot of sunscreen in other places and enjoy. Lots of good tips in this thread for dealing with this ride so read the whole thread
    Fai Mao
    A Proud Retrogrouch

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ms6073 View Post
    While this will vary from rider to rider, I think this would be a detriment for many as unlike the desert climate with relatively low humidity, this area of Texas suffers very high humidity which when coupled with the hot, blast-furnace like winds, typically do not allow for adequate evaporation. In such cases, depending on the composition of the cycling garment, water soaked jersey and bibs may actually increase heat retention which possibly could aid in accelerating the onset of heat exhaustion/stroke.

    That said, the wife and I have ridden the HHH and I have raced the USCF events numerous times over the past 20-years but our last was several years back when a cold-front blew in the night before and heavy rains cooled things off to the point we actually were considering arm warmers for the for the morning depart. With the cooler temps and light winds, we easily managed a 5-hour century that year and with temps just hitting the 75-degrees mark, it made it pretty easy to mark the HHH off the bucket list.
    At that time of year in that area the humidity can be below 20%. It is very dry.
    Fai Mao
    A Proud Retrogrouch

  25. #25
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    I'll be there with ya for my first. Excited and ready to go.
    2013 CAAD10

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