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Thread: VR Series

  1. #76
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    I'm 198 cm or 6'6" and the 61 works nicely. It is probably a little easier for me because when I walk in they automatically know they need to order the largest size. The VR5 is a great bike!

  2. #77
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    Thanks for the advice!
    Actuay, I'm looking for a friend. However i just now realized he should take XL - you See, I have a similar anatomy and am also between sizes at 178cm. Having just checked that my bike (Rose Pro SL 57cm) already has 390mm reach, the Felt in L is a no-go for him, especially because of those long arms. Test riding it won't be possible, I'm afraid.
    I do find the Headtube to be a bit too long, but i suppose any beginner will apreciate lots of stack (and I thought my bike was comfortable!!)
    Well, there's enough room for some cockpit adjustment and changing the stem is always an option.
    Last edited by Kalashnikirby; 05-15-2017 at 10:26 PM.

  3. #78
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    Finally pulled the trigger and purchased the VR5! Not crazy about the color scheme (power/baby blue and black), but what can you do.

    Looking at adding a "computer" - probably the Lezyne enhanced super GPS "computer". I was going to get the Garmin 25, but then saw a bunch of negative reviews.

    Hoping to get it fitted and take it for a ride this weekend - Very excited!

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffBinder View Post
    Finally pulled the trigger and purchased the VR5! Not crazy about the color scheme (power/baby blue and black), but what can you do.
    Everyone's different: I think the VR5 has the best color combo of the range!

    Anyway, I got my Conti 700x32 Four Seasons mounted and had a great route for a shakedown run this morning with my old-timers group. A real multi-surface ride: pavement, smooth gravel, rough gravel, very rough gravel, sand, mud, grass.

    The bike did great! The one spot that I was worried about is a short but steep climb diagonally up a hill on a grass/dirt path. Two guys ahead of me on a hybrid and MTB had to get off and walk up while I pulled out and motored on up past them without even having to get up off the seat.

    The only negative I noticed is that in any loose stuff, the relatively narrow drop-bars make it more difficult to control the front end than on my wider, straight-barred trail bike. But for all my intended uses, it looks like this bike is a winner! And by this time next week, I might even have my 46/30 crank in place...

  5. #80
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    @JeffBinder: Congratulation to the new ride.
    I like the color. Not as great as Chartreuse, but ...

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    ...
    Anyway, I got my Conti 700x32 Four Seasons mounted and had a great route for a shakedown run this morning with my old-timers group. A real multi-surface ride: pavement, smooth gravel, rough gravel, very rough gravel, sand, mud, grass....
    That ist quite challenging for a road tire like the 4 Season. ;)

    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    ...
    The only negative I noticed is that in any loose stuff, the relatively narrow drop-bars make it more difficult to control the front end than on my wider, straight-barred trail bike. But for all my intended uses, it looks like this bike is a winner! And by this time next week, I might even have my 46/30 crank in place...
    I changed my drop-bars right from the beginning from 42 to 44, give much more control and confidence on rough surface.
    The 3T Ergonova which came on my bike is quite narrow compared to others. The 44 I have now is like a 42 Ritchey.
    I'm really happy with the 46/30 crank. Even I'm riding mainly tarmac. Don't spinn out at fast descents, but always have the right gear for long climbs over 12%.

  7. #82
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    Dang it, playing with the bike and noticed around the rear axle, looks like the paint is scratched up. Thinking it happened when I got fitted for the bike and it was put on the stationary machine with a third party axle. Any idea if Felt has touch up paint?

  8. #83
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    Ohhhhhhhhhhhh
    The first scratch hurts.

    If it is only a optical issue I would't bother.
    But you can ask Felt direkt. They respond very quick.

    Cheers
    Last edited by Tobsn; 06-04-2017 at 12:12 AM.

  9. #84
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    Finally got out for a quick ride. I like the bike (VR5). I knew what I was purchasing, so not complaining, but I never moved the front derailleur from the larger of the two rings in the crankset (not sure, am I using the proper terms). Wondering if I can change out the cranskset for one that has a higher count?

    Of course with all this said, I probably only experienced an elevation change of 500 feet.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks so much everyone for responding to all my questions!!!

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffBinder View Post
    ... Wondering if I can change out the cranskset for one that has a higher count?...
    Yes you can.
    Just change the Chainrings.
    FSA offering chain rings for that crank in all common gear ratio.
    46/30 (you probably have)
    50/34
    53/36
    53/39

    If you wat to change the whole crank set. Consider it has a 30mm spindle.

    Quote Originally Posted by JeffBinder View Post
    ... but I never moved the front derailleur from the larger of the two rings in the crankset (not sure, am I using the proper terms)....
    Is that bad?
    This is one of the points why I didn't wanted 50/34 or 52/36.
    With 46/30 right from the start on the big ring and only for the real climbs on the small. Mainly shifting in the rear and only occasionally in the front.
    Close to 1x11, just with the wider range and more narrow gradation.

    Last edited by Tobsn; 06-04-2017 at 10:52 PM.

  11. #86
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    I am not planning on changing anything just yet, but good to know it is an option, thanks!

  12. #87
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    Just returned from my first extended trip on my VR5 and am happy with everything about it. For one thing, the roads in southern PA and MD are far hillier than anything I ever encounter where I live, and the VR5 did great -- much better than my previous go-to road bike. I'm not strong on hills, however, and am not sorry that I'll soon be installing a 46-30 crank to replace the 48-32, finally making my VR5 more like the rest of the range! I did get into my lowest gear (32/32) a couple times, but made it over the top each time while staying seated.

    The bike also worked well in all road conditions. It was mostly paved asphalt with one day of light drizzle. There was one section of a mile on a badly rutted unpaved road, and the last day was on an unpaved canal towpath. The bike did great on all surfaces and was very smooth on the somewhat bumpy towpath. I probably didn't need to have gone with the 700x32 tires, but at the time I was concerned about the towpath being muddy as it has been in the past.

    It's been a perfect choice for me so far!

  13. #88
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    I'm moving next week. I put a deposit on a 58cm VR30 that's in stock at my destination. I can hardly wait to pick it up!

    So, why the VR30?
    * In budget
    * Low gears (!!!)
    * Nice endurance frame design
    * 6061 Aluminum
    * 105 hardware
    * Hydraulic discs
    * Tubeless ready rims
    * Handles 32+ tires
    * 21.25 lbs. at this price point

    Low gears, hydraulic brakes, and a relaxed position were "must haves" as I'm an older guy just getting back into riding and - there is a half-mile 15% grade of rough pavement to get to my house. I need a good hill climber - and hill descender.

    At my first recent trip to a bike shop, the guy recommended a fitness bike and I tried out a Specialized Sirrus Sport with a 32f 34r setup. On a steep local hill, even that was a bit high. A 34-32 would have me walking up the hill home.

    I realized that after a few months I'd wish for drop bars. And I saw that one can spin out a 105 setup with a caliper extender and an 11-40 cassette. With a 30-40 setup, you literally have a walking cadence (5ft per rotation). If you can walk it, you could ride it with those gears. Nothing else offered the small crank, hydraulics, and 105 in an endurance bike at this price.

    If I were to step down, I'd be looking at the Giant Contend SL Disc 1 or the GT Grade Alloy 105, but I'd lose the small crank. If I were to step up, I'd be looking at the Trek Domane S5, Giant Defy Advanced 1 or the Felt VR5, but that's a lot of bike for somebody just getting back into riding.

    The bottom line is that the VR30 has no peer for my requirements. I only wish that it had the green paint of the VR40/VR3. As long as the fit of the 58 is good (I'm 6-1.5), I expect to be happy. It should be great on the secondary streets and gravel fire roads of my new home in Southern Oregon.

  14. #89
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    Some questions to experienced VR owners:
    1) Is the front end on the stiff side?
    2) Do you recommend upgrading to CF handlebars?
    3) If so, what do you recommend that fits?

    The reason I mention it is that the forks look to be straight and steep. that tells me that it's stiff for great control, but not that compliant. In one of the Felt videos, the male rider's hands were juddering when on gravel.

    Thanks for any and all replies!

    (Yeah, I haven't received the bike yet and am already shopping upgrades, but it would be nice to know what to get if I want more hand comfort. And yes, I'll try various tire pressures first.)

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonFairhurst View Post
    I realized that after a few months I'd wish for drop bars. And I saw that one can spin out a 105 setup with a caliper extender and an 11-40 cassette. With a 30-40 setup, you literally have a walking cadence (5ft per rotation). If you can walk it, you could ride it with those gears. Nothing else offered the small crank, hydraulics, and 105 in an endurance bike at this price.
    I agree with you on all the good points about the VR series. In you paragraph above, I think you meant to say "derailleur extender." Do you have an example of one of these? Also, what cassette would you use that has 11-40 gearing and is compatible with Shimano road 11-speed shifting?

    I'm also hoping that your "half mile 15%" grade is another typo, as I can't imagine myself trying to get up a climb like that . If I ever get down to walking speed going up a hill, I think I'd just get off and walk -- it would probably be easier!

    And your bike should do well on secondary roads and fire roads, while also doing quite well on the best roads as well!

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonFairhurst View Post
    Some questions to experienced VR owners:
    1) Is the front end on the stiff side?
    2) Do you recommend upgrading to CF handlebars?
    3) If so, what do you recommend that fits?

    The reason I mention it is that the forks look to be straight and steep. that tells me that it's stiff for great control, but not that compliant. In one of the Felt videos, the male rider's hands were juddering when on gravel.
    Seems like there are limits to the compliance you can get from any unsprung fork. I wouldn't want things too loosey-goosey down there! That said, I found it to be more comfortable than expected when I rode it last week on a section of semi-improved canal towpath that I had also ridden the previous year on my hybrid with hydraulic forks. The big bumps are going to come through more sharply, but it did a good job at smoothing out the overall roughness. In any case, it was sufficiently smooth at the bars.

    I haven't had any experience with CF bars on this bike, but will comment that the OEM bars have the most comfortable grip position in the drops that I've experienced compared to my last two road bikes (I've always stuck with the OEM bars). If I went with CF I'd look for one with matching geometry.

  17. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    I agree with you on all the good points about the VR series. In you paragraph above, I think you meant to say "derailleur extender." Do you have an example of one of these? Also, what cassette would you use that has 11-40 gearing and is compatible with Shimano road 11-speed shifting?
    Yes, derailleur extender.

    There are a number of 11-40 road bike videos on YouTube. The extender is the Wolf Tooth RoadLink and the cassette is the XT CS-M8000 11-40. One video shows a recommended spacer, but most don't seem to use it. I guess it depends on if you want to lean toward big-big or small-small.

    Here's one (non-spacer) video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNpdLrlN4HI

    I'm also hoping that your "half mile 15%" grade is another typo, as I can't imagine myself trying to get up a climb like that . If I ever get down to walking speed going up a hill, I think I'd just get off and walk -- it would probably be easier!
    I lied. It's only 0.4 miles, but with a 300+ ft rise. So that's about 300 feet up and 2000 feet out - or 15%. Welcome to the west, where you need a 9,000+ ft mountain to qualify as a state.

    I figure that if you want to ride the flats at 80 RPM, it should be no different up a hill. A 30-40 gives about 4.6 MPH at 80 rpm. Drop to 52 RPM and you're at walking pace. That's a goat, not a bike!
    Last edited by JonFairhurst; 06-15-2017 at 12:21 PM.

  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    Seems like there are limits to the compliance you can get from any unsprung fork. I wouldn't want things too loosey-goosey down there! That said, I found it to be more comfortable than expected when I rode it last week on a section of semi-improved canal towpath that I had also ridden the previous year on my hybrid with hydraulic forks. The big bumps are going to come through more sharply, but it did a good job at smoothing out the overall roughness. In any case, it was sufficiently smooth at the bars.

    I haven't had any experience with CF bars on this bike, but will comment that the OEM bars have the most comfortable grip position in the drops that I've experienced compared to my last two road bikes (I've always stuck with the OEM bars). If I went with CF I'd look for one with matching geometry.
    Great to hear that the stock bars are comfortable and that the geometry is good. My last bike was a steel Motobecane from the 70s(!) But I put many miles on the bike and liked the multiple grip options on drop bars. I can't wait to ride a modern version.

    The engineer in me really likes the Felt design. The forks and triangles are relatively straight, which means that they are strong. When those items are used for suspension, the right and left sides can move differently, which can allow unwanted self-steering or leaning. As examples, I don't care for the Diamondback or Norco rear triangles. (That said, this is theoretical. Maybe they're great in practice.) Instead I like solid connections to the wheels and to allow fore-aft movement in the seat and bars.

    I'll definitely give the stock bars a good shot and try tire options before spending money on CF bars. And if I decide to upgrade, I'll know more about my preferred geometry after some good miles on the VR.

  19. #94
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    I did some calculations. At 220 lbs of rider+bike+clothes+helmet riding 0.4 miles with a rise of 300 feet, here are the results:

    Pedaling at 80 rpm with the super-granny 30-40 setup, you burn 294W and go 4.6 MPH for just over five minutes.

    Pedaling at 80 rpm with a compact 34-32, you would burn 417W(!) for just over 3-1/2 minutes at 6.6 MPH.

    Slow it down to 60 RPM and the super granny you would burn 221W at about 3.5 MPH. With the compact, 60 RPM costs 312 W at 4.9 MPH.

    A novice rider would really need to crunch a slow cadence to take a compact set up that grade. The super-granny makes the climb sound achievable.

  20. #95
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    Jon, I'm an engineer myself and one of the things that got me fired up about the VR series is this video on their web site that explains how the frame design and other features work: Technology | Introducing the VR

    Not to keep raving about this bike, but yesterday I tried some different conditions on a mile-long stretch of a bike path that goes through a wetlands area (politically correct term for "swamp"). There are several sections of boardwalk along it, and over the years the boards have become warped and cupped so that it's pretty much of a "washboard road" effect. In fact, it was so rough on my last ride through there that I haven't used it in over a year.

    Well, the VR5 went through there more smoothly by far than I was expecting! It was definitely more comfortable than my hybrid, which has a suspension fork but also an aluminum frame, which probably explains the difference. That's still no help if you run over a nail-pop, but I stayed lucky this time.

  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    Just returned from my first extended trip on my VR5 and am happy with everything about it. ...

    Yes the VR is a perfect companion for such extended trips.
    Will we see some pictures or will there a blog entry?

  22. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tobsn View Post

    Yes the VR is a perfect companion for such extended trips.
    Will we see some pictures or will there a blog entry?
    I'll eventually get around to it -- too busy enjoying summer weather right now.

  23. #98
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    Hi All,

    I am very interested in the VR30. I actually ordered a Breezer Inversion Team yesterday (team deal), but they are totally out of stock from Breezer. Bummed. So, I'm now looking at the VR30, the new Diverge Comp E5, and the Diamond Back Haanjo Trail (spec'd very well, but kinda looks like a clown bike).

    I rode a VR40 today and although it's lower down in the line, it was very nice. I'm specifically looking for a gravel bike.

    For those of you that own a VR, do you feel that this bike can truly be considered a gravel bike? Or is it more of an endurance bike that can go on gravel well? I'll be putting bigger tires first off.

    Any advice you guys can offer? Thoughts?

    Thanks.

    Brandon

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigPoser View Post
    ...
    For those of you that own a VR, do you feel that this bike can truly be considered a gravel bike? Or is it more of an endurance bike that can go on gravel well? ...
    Oh boy, do I love those marketing terms.
    What is Gravel? What is Endurance? ...
    By the bike you like most and suites your need.
    And if you tell us your needs, we can tell you if the VR can fit those.

    Comparing the Breezer Inversion and the Felt VR, both are made for a stabile and comfortable ride.

  25. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by rochrunner View Post
    I'll eventually get around to it -- too busy enjoying summer weather right now.

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