Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Alx
    Alx is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Alx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    587

    Cheapest way to build a fixie

    So I have a bike I'm looking to turn into a fixie, only question I have is what to do with the rear wheel? It's a 12 speed bike so what's the least expensive way to go fixed? New wheels? Or buy a kit with spacers to go in place of the cassette?

    Never done this before and have no Idea where to start.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    114
    as always, sheldon brown is a good place to start
    http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed/index.html

  3. #3
    Alx
    Alx is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Alx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    587
    OK I have read every page of sheldon brown, Thanks though.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    507
    I got new wheels with high flange front, fixed rear hubs from sheldon's bike store, Harris Cyclery
    David Leroy Loving, III
    Waxahachie, Texas
    Biciclette Gios

  5. #5
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,272
    But even with a cheap conversion, it's good to at least invest in an inexpensive fixed rear wheel with a true lockring. Wheels built around Formula or Dimension hubs are plentiful.

  6. #6
    Steaming piles of opinion
    Reputation: danl1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    10,526
    Quote Originally Posted by Alx
    So I have a bike I'm looking to turn into a fixie, only question I have is what to do with the rear wheel? It's a 12 speed bike so what's the least expensive way to go fixed? New wheels? Or buy a kit with spacers to go in place of the cassette?

    Never done this before and have no Idea where to start.
    Well, if it's 12 speed, it probably doesn't have a cassette, but a freewheel. In that case, you can take off the freewheel and spin on a cog, along with an old BB lockring to try to do some of what a proper lockring would. You would also need to respace the axle and redish the wheel, just as you already read in Sheldon. That is undoubtedly the least expensive route, as well as the least safe. It also may not work, depending on the frame you are working with, the type of dropouts it has, and whether you can make a usable gear work out. I've done it, but that doesn't mean I recommend it.

    The next cheapest is to get a set of track hubs and rebuild the wheel. I'm guessing that's out of the question. A cheap set of track wheels is next, though you'll want to make sure they are spaced for your frame.

    Speaking of which, you haven't mentioned if your frame has either horizontal drops or track ends. If it doesn't, you'll either need to get lucky with a magic gear, or resort to an ENO hub and wheel.

    Spacer kits result in a singlespeed, not a fixie. Since you probably don't have a cassette, that's not likely an option anyway.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    44

    White Industries Eno Eccentric

    If you are looking for a low cost (much different than a CHEAP) way of doing things, I would run with an White Industries Eno Eccentric Hub. This will allow you to get the proper chain tension while having vertical dropouts. I have been using one now for about 5ish years and haven't had one problem with it yet. Mine is used as a fixie and ALWAYS is my foul weather bike. I would guess it probably has 10,000ish miles on it or so. The hub is a flip-flop design so you can run it fixie or with a freewheel on the other side depending on what you are into an even use different cog sizes using the same chain.

    Using this hub, all you will really need to do is build the wheel around it and you are set. Everything else on the bike can stay the same.

  8. #8
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,272
    An ENO hub is not cheap. The OP's bike is an old 12 speed so I assume the frame has horizontal dropouts.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    23
    I don't know if this will work, but it's what I used;

    http://www.surlybikes.com/parts/fixxer_pop.html

  10. #10
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,272
    ^^^ Since the OP's wheel is an old 12 speed, his hub does not have a free hub body, therefore cannot use the Surly Fixxer.
    The cheapest solution for him is to remove the freewheel, loctite on a quality track cog or a freewheel cog if going singlespeed, and re-space/re-dish.

    OP: If you want to strictly go singlespeed, your cheapest solution is to keep the freewheel cluster and to run your shortened, derailleur-less chain in the middle of that cluster. Re-dishing of wheel is not required.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: sfsailor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    94

    Used rear wheel

    If you want to check it out safely you can pick up a used rear wheel for way under a 100.00 delivered. I think that would be cheaper than even the most budget rear wheel build. Toss the shifting hardware and leave both brakes on to start with. I am anot sure what part of Texas you are in but CL frequently has take of wheel sets for 100.00 or so, but that will require shopping.
    Another option is to try singe speeding first. Off with the six-speed on with the bmx freewheel (<20.00) and you are into a whole new experience.

  12. #12
    Alx
    Alx is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Alx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    587
    Thanks for all the help guys, I'm sure I'll have tons of questions once I get started tearing it down.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    49

    That rear wheel

    I just built up a fixed gear bike(trying to go cheap), was pretty set on just threading a track cog onto the freewheel threads with hopefully room for a "liquid threadlockered" locknut, respacing, and redishing the wheel. I've talked to people who've done this, even without the locknut for whole winter seasons, however I haven't talked to people who have had rear gears disastorously unscrew due to using a non-fixed gear hub (without the "reverse" thread locknut provision). Regardless, I noticed on E-bay, their are complete no-name wheelsets regularly(some with tires & gear, locknut!) for $110-130 with shipping, or just a name brand rear wheel & hub for about $100 shipped. I ended up just getting one of those rear wheels, popping it in(skipped the spacing, redishing, chainline was perfect, etc), shortened the chain; didn't take a whole lot with that wheel as my old 12 speed Schwinn frame was even spaced 120mm. I have already been out for two 20-25 mile rides..fun!! I used a 42-16 gear(about 70 gear inches), which is as hard a gear as I would want to push in our hilly, rolling Seattle terrain. Only about 10% slower than the geared bike, to my surprise.
    Last edited by ridenow1; 11-21-2007 at 09:14 AM.

  14. #14
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,272
    Quote Originally Posted by ridenow1
    ...... however I haven't talked to people who have had rear gears disastorously unscrew due to using a non-fixed gear hub with the reverse thread locknut.
    I think you meant non-reverse thread locknut. Anyway, you'll find most of them who experience this are skid stoppers. Those who rarely have these problems, including stripped threads are ones who ride with brakes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

EUROBIKE

Hot Deals

Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook