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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    De Bernardi fixed

    I got my De Bernardi back from the shop on Thursday, and it's been "fixed." It was dark and rainy last night, so I worked on getting the saddle and stem adjusted just right. By the time I got home this afternoon it was almost dark, so I only had enough time for a quick spin around the neighborhood for a test run with the freewheel cog. The saddle felt just about perfect but I might need a longer reach stem. Here are the specs:

    - De Bernardi SL steel frame, circa late 1990s
    - Mavic CXP-22 wheels w/ Formula hubs and Michelin Pro2Race tires (23)
    - Ultegra 9-speed crank w/ Sugino 42T chainring
    - Ultegra brake calipers, Nashbar bar-end levers
    - Forte (ITM) handlebar chopped and flopped
    - Cinelli natural cork wrap
    - Tange Levin headset
    - Nitto Technomic stem, 10 cm
    - 16T Dura Ace fixed cog, 18T Shimano freewheel
    - Brooks B-17 honey saddle w/ CLB seatpost

    The entire build cost me about $350 for new parts and labor, and half of that cost was the wheels. However, that cost does not include parts I already had -- including the frame, headset, stem, handlebar, brakes, saddle, seatpost, crankset and BB, tires.

    I'll post a ride report and better photos this weekend. In my short 2-mile ride around the neighborhood, it rode incredibly smooth and quiet. I had been using this frame for my commuter bike, and had never ridden it so stripped down. It's probably 10 lbs lighter than the way it was set up for a typical commute.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails De Bernardi fixed-debe-ss1.jpg   De Bernardi fixed-debe-ss2.jpg  

  2. #2
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
    Reputation: Dave Hickey's Avatar
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    Sweet. Can't wait for a ride report....It sure looks nice
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Done with winter.
    Reputation: asterisk's Avatar
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    Looks good. Chrome stays and fork always up the class factor.

  4. #4
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    Very cool---that'll be a very fun/comfortable fixie. I have a 9spd Ultegra crank on one of my fixies too. I think they look great as single chainring cranks. I'll have to look into that CLB seatpost---looks like it has a nice amount of set-back for a Brooks saddle.

    dk

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tarwheel2's Avatar
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    no longer a virgin

    Well, I took my maiden voyage on the De Bernardi as a fixe. It was my first fixed ride ever. I rode about 10 miles through the neighborhood after finishing a 42-miler on one of my regular geared road bkes. Interesting experience. I came closest to spilling while clipping in for the first time since I couldn't coast. After that, I didn't have any more close calls. Here are some initial observations:

    - I had to really concentrate riding fixed - no daydreaming or smelling the flowers.
    - I used my brakes more than I ever do riding my other bikes, mainly to keep my speed on the downhills within my comfortable spinning range. I would have killed myself if I didn't have brakes.
    - My top speed was about 26 mph with 42x16 gearing. I wasn't really comfortable riding faster than about 25 mph, however, since I was spinning so fast. Then I started feathering the brakes.
    - I always thought that fixed gear bikes were for mashers, but now I think it's the other way around. Fortunately I am more of a spinner in my usual riding, but what I called spinning was small potatoes compared to going downhill at 26 mph fixed.
    - The bike felt great. The Brooks B17 is a great combination with the frame and fixed setup. Very comfortable.
    - I had lowered the bars about 1 cm after riding the bike freewheel, but raised it again after riding it fixed. My hands were locked in the same position the whole time riding fixed, so I had quick access to my brakes, and I'll need the extra rise.

    Here are a few more shots of the bike under more favorable lighting.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails De Bernardi fixed-debe-fixe-1.jpg   De Bernardi fixed-debe-fixe-2.jpg   De Bernardi fixed-debe-fixe-3.jpg  

  6. #6
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
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    Very nice build!

    I played around with brake lever location on my first fixed gear. I eventually felt comfortable with my front brake lever mounted near the stem on the bullhorns.
    Last edited by roadfix; 02-01-2009 at 12:08 PM.
    SurlySteamrollerLitespeedClassicBianchiPista
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  7. #7
    eRacer
    Reputation: jmlapoint's Avatar
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    Very, Very nice looking build.
    Love the Brooks Saddle and the Cinelli Cork Tape.
    It appears your Chainring is mounted on the outside of your Crankarm, and I assume this gives you a good Chainline. I have to run mine on the inside for it to line up.
    +1 for Lever Brake Mounting. Cleaner setup, and for me is more comfortable and easier to get to since I ride tops mostly.
    Friendly comments.
    Still an extremely nice setup.
    John Lapoint / San Diego
    God is Great, Beer is Good, and People are Crazy!

  8. #8
    Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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    The Nashbar TT levers are real good. Nashbar _insert part here_ is always underrated. They have quality stuff, and some stuff nobody else makes.
    '09 Voodoo Wazoo
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    1 hour of running = 1 hour of wasted time when you could have been riding. - Alaska Mike

  9. #9
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
    Reputation: Dave Hickey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmlapoint
    .
    It appears your Chainring is mounted on the outside of your Crankarm, and I assume this gives you a good Chainline. I have to run mine on the inside for it to line up.
    :

    I wondered the same thing...All my converted double cranks use the inside position too.....If it works on the outside, it sure looks better...
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    chainring

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hickey
    I wondered the same thing...All my converted double cranks use the inside position too.....If it works on the outside, it sure looks better...
    My mechanic said the chain line was near perfect with ring mounted to the outside.

  11. #11
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarwheel2
    My mechanic said the chain line was near perfect with ring mounted to the outside.
    How does it look to you, simply by eye-balling?
    SurlySteamrollerLitespeedClassicBianchiPista
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  12. #12
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    Looks nice

    Really neat job with the bike. 26mph with 42x16 is winding it out. Ha ha, I'd probably face plant at those revs. Is it my imagination or is the rear tire clearance to the seat tube pretty tight? You have to deflate the tire a bit to make the change with the horizontals?

    Quote Originally Posted by tarwheel2
    Well, I took my maiden voyage on the De Bernardi as a fixe. It was my first fixed ride ever. I rode about 10 miles through the neighborhood after finishing a 42-miler on one of my regular geared road bkes. Interesting experience. I came closest to spilling while clipping in for the first time since I couldn't coast. After that, I didn't have any more close calls. Here are some initial observations:

    - I had to really concentrate riding fixed - no daydreaming or smelling the flowers.
    - I used my brakes more than I ever do riding my other bikes, mainly to keep my speed on the downhills within my comfortable spinning range. I would have killed myself if I didn't have brakes.
    - My top speed was about 26 mph with 42x16 gearing. I wasn't really comfortable riding faster than about 25 mph, however, since I was spinning so fast. Then I started feathering the brakes.
    - I always thought that fixed gear bikes were for mashers, but now I think it's the other way around. Fortunately I am more of a spinner in my usual riding, but what I called spinning was small potatoes compared to going downhill at 26 mph fixed.
    - The bike felt great. The Brooks B17 is a great combination with the frame and fixed setup. Very comfortable.
    - I had lowered the bars about 1 cm after riding the bike freewheel, but raised it again after riding it fixed. My hands were locked in the same position the whole time riding fixed, so I had quick access to my brakes, and I'll need the extra rise.

    Here are a few more shots of the bike under more favorable lighting.
    i've got limited minutes left in life, don't waste my time

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    clearance

    Quote Originally Posted by boneman
    Really neat job with the bike. 26mph with 42x16 is winding it out. Ha ha, I'd probably face plant at those revs. Is it my imagination or is the rear tire clearance to the seat tube pretty tight? You have to deflate the tire a bit to make the change with the horizontals?
    The De Bernardi has steep angles (74) and short chainstays, so there is not much clearance. I did have to deflate the rear tire to flop the wheel, and it's got 23 mm tires (although Michelins run wide). However, I actually ran Panaracer Pasela 28s for a while on this frame while using as my commuter, but there was less than 5 mm clearance between the seat tube and tire.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    chain line

    Quote Originally Posted by roadfix
    How does it look to you, simply by eye-balling?
    I'm obviously no expert but it looks fine to me, and the drive train was very quiet while riding. My mechanic has 30 years experience building bikes, so I'll trust his judgment. I specifically told him when I dropped it off for the build that other people I had talked to said the chainring might need to go on the inside. He told me that he tried it both ways, and the chain line was better to the outside.

  15. #15
    hello
    Reputation: roadfix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarwheel2
    I'm obviously no expert but it looks fine to me, and the drive train was very quiet while riding. My mechanic has 30 years experience building bikes, so I'll trust his judgment. I specifically told him when I dropped it off for the build that other people I had talked to said the chainring might need to go on the inside. He told me that he tried it both ways, and the chain line was better to the outside.
    Sounds good to me! Enjoy your new ride!

    SurlySteamrollerLitespeedClassicBianchiPista
    DeanColonelSurlyLongHaulTruckerKonaKu
    LitespeedFirenzeCinelliOlympic

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