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Thread: Lockring tool

  1. #1
    Re-Cyclist
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    Lockring tool

    What is the correct Park Tool spanner wrench for use on fixed gear hub lockrings? I've seen a few offered, and don't want to order the wrong one.
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  2. #2
    Mevadus
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    Last edited by Mevadus; 04-03-2011 at 12:55 PM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks!
    Santa Barbara, CA -- My Photo Site -- My Business Site

  4. #4
    vexatious enigma
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mevadus
    Yup yup. The HCW-5 will also get the job done (it is what Ive been using for a couple years and is usually stocked at the average LBS) but the 17 the right tool. I didn't even know that the HCW-17 existed and will be ordering it.
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio
    Unlike Roebuck, you do "do" people.
    Maybe Judas did it for a Klondike bar.

    Life in the fast lane with no brakes

  5. #5
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    Got the tool and it works fine. The problem I had today, wanting to change my rear cog, was that with a 1/8 x 1/2 chain whip tool around the cog, the thickness of the chain plates prevented the spanner tool from fully engaging the lockring, enough mismatch so that I wouldn't try to use both tools simultaneously. Fortunately, I was able to loosen a tight ring with only the Park spanner, then use the chain whip to loosen the cog.
    Santa Barbara, CA -- My Photo Site -- My Business Site

  6. #6
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    glad to hear you got it done...
    but what made you think that you need to use the chainwhip & lockring tool at the same time?

  7. #7
    vexatious enigma
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    Quote Originally Posted by markaitch
    glad to hear you got it done...
    but what made you think that you need to use the chainwhip & lockring tool at the same time?
    Yeah, you don't need both. You only need to be using one at a time.
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio
    Unlike Roebuck, you do "do" people.
    Maybe Judas did it for a Klondike bar.

    Life in the fast lane with no brakes

  8. #8
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    Of coarse u can save some time and not use the lockring and use the Rotafixa method it tightens the cog and will remove it in the same way. With this technique it is possible to apply a tightening torque much greater than that available using a chain whip: the force is applied at a distance which coincides with the radius of the wheel instead of the much smaller radius of the sprocket, greatly increasing the leverage. The lock ring is now unnecessary.
    U can put a shop rag around the bottom bracket to protect the finish(paint) .


    RotaFixa -- http://204.73.203.34/fisso/eng/schpignone.htm

  9. #9
    vexatious enigma
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    Quote Originally Posted by MADMAXB
    Of coarse u can save some time and not use the lockring and use the Rotafixa method it tightens the cog and will remove it in the same way. With this technique it is possible to apply a tightening torque much greater than that available using a chain whip: the force is applied at a distance which coincides with the radius of the wheel instead of the much smaller radius of the sprocket, greatly increasing the leverage. The lock ring is now unnecessary.
    U can put a shop rag around the bottom bracket to protect the finish(paint) .


    RotaFixa -- http://204.73.203.34/fisso/eng/schpignone.htm
    Riding on the street without a lockring is not a very good idea at all. It is fine on the track when you are in the higher levels of racing but on the street I say that you should use a lockring. You never know when you may need it. Cogs do come loose sometimes if you are applying back pressure at all. I used enough force one time to work both the cog and lockring loose (a few months later while changing the cog the lockring stripped which may or may not be related.)

    This is a good method to get the chain on though. Ive never used it myself; can anyone speak of what something like that does to the chain?
    My method is to put the cog on the hub install the wheel and tighten up the chain. Put the front wheel against a heavy object (houses work sometimes) and hop onto the drive side crank arm.
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio
    Unlike Roebuck, you do "do" people.
    Maybe Judas did it for a Klondike bar.

    Life in the fast lane with no brakes

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