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  1. #1
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    2017 Fuji SL Disc

    Have any of you ridden one? I think I might try to test one tomorrow on my day off. I heard the original rim brake version is super light and very responsive, but a bit twitchy on descents. I am curious how the new bike with disc brakes and longer chainstays rides. It should be more stable with very little downside. We'll see...

    Fuji adds disc brakes and thru axels to the SL for 2017 - BikeRadar USA

    The highest level frameset is less than $1900 and it is probably one of the lightest disc brake framesets out there. Performance has the lower level complete bikes at a fairly reasonable price point as well, but the Giant TCR Advanced Disc and Scott Addict Disc are priced similarly given the specs.

    https://www.coloradocyclist.com/fuji...-frameset-2017

    Fuji SL 2.5 Disc Road Bike - 2017

    Fuji SL 2.1 Disc Road Bike - 2017
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 11-22-2016 at 10:57 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    Well, I just got home from test riding two Fuji SL bikes and I am extremely impressed to be honest. I tested a 2016 Fuji SL 2.6 LE with rim brakes and a 2017 Fuji SL Disc 2.1. Both were size 52cm, but the new disc bike looked and felt like it was a little bigger than the 2016 (it could have just been my mind playing tricks on me though). The C5 Carbon fiber 2.6 LE was roughly 19lbs stock and the C10 Carbon disc bike was about 17.5lbs stock. I also got to take a close look at Fuji SL Disc 1.5, but it was in a 56cm, so I couldn't ride it. That bike is reportedly 2lbs lighter than the bike I tested today and it sure felt like it when I picked it up. I regret that we didn't throw it on the scales, but I was eager to get out on the bikes and forgot to ask.

    At the end of my rides I felt like this bike moved into pole position on the list of my favorite bikes I have ridden this year. It bumped both the Giant TCR Advanced Disc 1 and the new Specialized Roubaix down a peg. That surprised me quite a bit. For my tastes, you can't beat the combination of stiffness, weight, ride quality, and value at the end of the day and I give this bike high grades in all four categories. All of the gadgets and technological advancements are fun, but how a bike accelerates and feels on climbs and rough surfaces is still what matters most to me. The Fuji SL is VERY responsive. I feel like it was significantly easier to get up to speed than the Transonic is. Even the C5 Carbon version felt way more responsive than either of the Transonics I tested last year (the website says the 2.6 LE is C10, but the guys at the shop said it is C5. The scale seemed to confirm that). I would say the stiffness is on par with the Giant TCR Advanced Disc I tested a month or so ago, but it felt smoother/more compliant in the rear end. This thing was buttery smooth in my opinion. I loved the sensation that came from having this explosive acceleration combined with smooth ride quality; it's very nice.

    I also think you get a bit more bang for your buck with the Fuji because Giant has reduced the number of models they offer in the U.S. this year. So if you like discs and want a complete bike, your choices are $2375, $4700, and like $8000 or you can build a bike up from framesets that cost $1950 (mid level) or $2800 (hi-mod). Going with the Fuji allows you to grab a disc equipped bike for $2100 (which was on sale today for $1799). That comes with mechanical discs, but I see Ultegra RS685 hydraulic shifters on ebay all the time for $150-$250. The Ultegra equipped Fuji SL Disc 2.1 comes in at a little over $3000 and was on sale today for $2499. Moreover, you can get a top of the line super lightweight 1.1 C15 Carbon Disc frameset for $1899 or so. That's $1000 cheaper than Giant's top tier frameset. It looked like there was plenty of room for wider wheels and 28mm tires on the 2.1 Disc as well.

    I know on paper 17.5lbs doesn't seem that impressive, but this bike appeared to be weighed down by some pretty heavy, lower level components. My guess is that you could easily shed 1-1.5lbs with some basic component changes and an upgrade to a set of lightweight tubeless or tubular wheels. Those are things I would be adding regardless of which bike I buy, so doing it with the Fuji SL just makes doing so a little easier on the pocketbook. I highly recommend testing one if you haven't. This thing was a ton of fun on the punchy climb and the open flats that were on the test loop I took it on. The 2.6 LE wasn't anything to sniff at either and would make a great entry level carbon ride at $1599.

    2017 Fuji SL Disc-img_1402.jpg
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 11-23-2016 at 12:50 PM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  5. #5
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    Very nice bikes and a great value..

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    I have a 2016 SL 2.3 and love it. The bike likes to go fast. I swapped the original wheels and tires for some Ultegra 6800 wheels with Michelin Pro 3 Service Course tires and I'm extremely happy with it. I don't think I'm going to change anything else for now. I thought about swapping the crankset to Ultegra but the Oval seem to be doing just fine. Once the parts start wearing then I'll consider "upgrading" them. I've put about 650 miles on it since I bought it in September. I also agree that Fuji and the SL line is a great value overall compared to other big name brands.

    Good luck!
    2016 Fuji SL 2.3
    2016 Giant Toughroad SLR
    2014 Marin Bocat Trail 29er

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    Quote Originally Posted by laurido92 View Post
    I have a 2016 SL 2.3 and love it. The bike likes to go fast. I swapped the original wheels and tires for some Ultegra 6800 wheels with Michelin Pro 3 Service Course tires and I'm extremely happy with it. I don't think I'm going to change anything else for now. I thought about swapping the crankset to Ultegra but the Oval seem to be doing just fine. Once the parts start wearing then I'll consider "upgrading" them. I've put about 650 miles on it since I bought it in September. I also agree that Fuji and the SL line is a great value overall compared to other big name brands.

    Good luck!
    Yep, it's kind of ridiculous where they are priced at. Performance has 2016 2.6, and 2.5 for less than $1400 and the 2.4 for $1500. All are reportedly C10 carbon. If you aren't married to the idea of having disc brakes, those are incredible values IMO. The only carbon bikes that come close that I have seen are the 2017 Giant Defy Advanced 3 and the 2017 Giant TCR Advanced 2. All of these bikes are made from fairly decent quality carbon and a number of them come equipped with Shimano 105 or higher. You can't beat that.

    Fuji SL 2.6 LE Road Bike - 2016 Performance Exclusive

    Fuji SL 2.4 LE Road Bike - 2016 Performance Exclusive

    https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/defy-advanced-3

    https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/bikes-tcr-advanced
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  8. #8
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    how wide a rim/tire can you fit on the sl disc? will it fit 28?
    Stop in at Element Sports. www.elementsport.com
    Get Out! Have Fun!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwiffle View Post
    how wide a rim/tire can you fit on the sl disc? will it fit 28?
    Absolutely, in my opinion. They come stock with 25mm and there was lots of room left.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  10. #10
    I love to climb!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Absolutely, in my opinion. They come stock with 25mm and there was lots of room left.
    Cool, thx!
    Stop in at Element Sports. www.elementsport.com
    Get Out! Have Fun!

  11. #11
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    No problem at all. I went through my old pictures and this should give you an idea of how much room there is.

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    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  12. #12
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    I bought the closeout on the 2016 Fuji SL 2.6 LE yesterday during a closeout sale for the 2016 models, at $1,080, regularly $2000. They also had double points, so I used those for pedals, lights, fenders, pump, etc. as I will be using it as a commuter. They are putting the accessories on today, tuning it up, and I'll be picking it up later. I'm sure it will be fine as a commuter bike, but I will update this post to let you know. My commute is fairly hilly, and I expect this bike will do just fine on the hills. If not, I could upgrade the wheels and tires like I normally do, as in my experience, just this one small upgrade makes a world of difference.

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    Just picked up the bike yesterday (2016 Fuji SL 2.6 LE). Rode it for the first time this morning. Got three PR's already, two on the flats by a narrow margin, and one hill climbing by a wide margin. So far, the hill climbing seems to be the advantage for this bike. Time will tell on the flats and the downhills. The Redmond, WA Performance Bike was excellent again. I have bought two bikes from them now, and one prior in the former Tukwila, WA store.

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    Also, I did validate on my 2016 Fuji SL 2.6 LE, that it is an Oval 520, midcompact, 52x36 crankset, not the compact, as advertised on the Performance website. I actually kind of prefer the midcompact, as this is what comes on a lot of the upper end bikes, and the hills were no problem for me this morning.

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    My first two road bikes had the compact and my SL 2.3 came with mid compact and I really like it. Especially when paired with an 11-28 cassette.

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    Hi all,

    I'm the customer for whom Jwiffle was asking the tire clearance questions. We finished the build last month. It's a mix of SRAM Red (crank and cassette) and Force (shifters, brakes, derailleurs) groupsets. We laced Light Bicycle carbon hoops to Hope RS4 hubs with DT Swiss Aerolite spokes, with tubeless Maxxis Padrone TR clinchers. I've got 28c on it right now, but it looks like it could probably take a 32c out back (definitely enough fork clearance).

    2017 Fuji SL Disc-fuji-disc.jpg

    With a full bottle, it came in under 16.5lbs. The bike accelerates like a rocket, it absolutely begs to be ridden fast. I keep reading thry descend twitchy, but I haven't experienced that at all. On my first ride, it felt as stable on a short (~1/4mi) -18% avg hill as my previous aluminum frame bike, yet it weighs 6lbs less. Disc brakes were the big deciding factor for me; I wanted a race, not an endurance bike, and very few come with discs. There is just nothing like the breaking confidence you get on wet roads and steep descents.
    --Dave

    2017 Fuji SL Disc 1.1
    2015 Fuji Cross 3.0 LE
    2015 GT Sensor Comp
    2017 Salsa Beargrease NX

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by noodlesatf View Post
    Hi all,

    I'm the customer for whom Jwiffle was asking the tire clearance questions. We finished the build last month. It's a mix of SRAM Red (crank and cassette) and Force (shifters, brakes, derailleurs) groupsets. We laced Light Bicycle carbon hoops to Hope RS4 hubs with DT Swiss Aerolite spokes, with tubeless Maxxis Padrone TR clinchers. I've got 28c on it right now, but it looks like it could probably take a 32c out back (definitely enough fork clearance).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    With a full bottle, it came in under 16.5lbs. The bike accelerates like a rocket, it absolutely begs to be ridden fast. I keep reading thry descend twitchy, but I haven't experienced that at all. On my first ride, it felt as stable on a short (~1/4mi) -18% avg hill as my previous aluminum frame bike, yet it weighs 6lbs less. Disc brakes were the big deciding factor for me; I wanted a race, not an endurance bike, and very few come with discs. There is just nothing like the breaking confidence you get on wet roads and steep descents.
    Nice! I finally was able to pick one of these up yesterday (same bike, but on a really nice sale). I pick it up tomorrow. My mind is already compiling a list of potential upgrades. What wheels did you end up going with?
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Nice! I finally was able to pick one of these up yesterday (same bike, but on a really nice sale). I pick it up tomorrow. My mind is already compiling a list of potential upgrades. What wheels did you end up going with?
    Thanks! They're Light Bicycle RR36C02 carbon hoops, laced to Hope RS4 centerlock hubs with DT Swiss Aerolite spokes. I started as a mountain biker, and the LB stuff is well known and respected by that community. These are the only hoops they have for the new wide/tubeless trend, with a 21mm internal width. The Maxxis Padrone TR 28c tires I mounted to them stretched out to 29.5mm.

    Which model did you get? Did you buy the 1.1 frameset to build up, or a complete bike?
    --Dave

    2017 Fuji SL Disc 1.1
    2015 Fuji Cross 3.0 LE
    2015 GT Sensor Comp
    2017 Salsa Beargrease NX

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by noodlesatf View Post
    Thanks! They're Light Bicycle RR36C02 carbon hoops, laced to Hope RS4 centerlock hubs with DT Swiss Aerolite spokes. I started as a mountain biker, and the LB stuff is well known and respected by that community. These are the only hoops they have for the new wide/tubeless trend, with a 21mm internal width. The Maxxis Padrone TR 28c tires I mounted to them stretched out to 29.5mm.

    Which model did you get? Did you buy the 1.1 frameset to build up, or a complete bike?
    Thank you for the info. I got a 2017 SL 2.1 Disc with full Ultegra on closeout sale. I'll check their stuff out. Right now, I am considering the new Trek Bontrager Aeolus Pro 3 TLR that have a similar profile and are "only" $1200. I am open to other options at the moment as well though. Do you know if their wheels are tubeless ready?

    https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/e...ode=black_grey
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Thank you for the info. I got a 2017 SL 2.1 Disc with full Ultegra on closeout sale. I'll check their stuff out. Right now, I am considering the new Trek Bontrager Aeolus Pro 3 TLR that have a similar profile and are "only" $1200. I am open to other options at the moment as well though. Do you know if their wheels are tubeless ready?
    All the LB hoops are tubeless ready, and mine set up really easy. The only snag was the width which made it tricky to get the tire to spread out far enough at the valve stem, since both beads wanted to get stuck on side of the valve or the other. I'm at around 70psi rear and 65psi front on 28c Maxxis Padrone TR tires. You spoke of the acceleration of the bike earlier in the thread, and that is absolutely my experience; it's ridiculous how quickly it gets up to speed. This bike really likes going fast, and Padrones are super fast rolling.

    My only complaint is that I don't think road tubeless is quite there yet. I've got around 1100mi on the bike, and I've experienced two small (1/4-1/3") gashes on the rear. The sealant plugged them, but it's only stable around 40-45psi. Pump it up more, and it starts to open back up and bleed air until it stabilizes again at the lower pressure level. In both instances, I unmounted the tire, completely cleaned the sealant away from the gash area on the inside, and used a small piece of Gorilla tape as a patch (a Park tire boot just didn't do the trick). I then floated a bit of gel superglue (since it's got some elasticity to it) into the gash from the outside, pushed the gash shut, and remounted the tire an hour later. In both cases, it's held up well, but it's obvious that current sealant just can't keep up with the higher pressure requirements (I use Stan's, but Orange was no better). I've had zero problems out of the front tire, so my guess is that it's way more puncture/gash resistant with less weight on it.

    I've not once flatted on my tubeless mountain bikes or gravel bike, but those are much lower pressure; 38psi on 40c gravel tires, 22psi on 650b tires, and 7psi on the fatty), and they're all heavier casings, meant for abuse. The roads in my area are also not the best (lots of debris, including frequent broken glass), since my friends in more rural areas have had no issues at all. So, keep that all in mind when you're deciding on what approach you want to take, since you're not going to get light and fast rolling AND good puncture/gash resistance. I always ride with a spare tube, but both of my gashes occurred within limp home range.
    --Dave

    2017 Fuji SL Disc 1.1
    2015 Fuji Cross 3.0 LE
    2015 GT Sensor Comp
    2017 Salsa Beargrease NX

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by noodlesatf View Post
    All the LB hoops are tubeless ready, and mine set up really easy. The only snag was the width which made it tricky to get the tire to spread out far enough at the valve stem, since both beads wanted to get stuck on side of the valve or the other. I'm at around 70psi rear and 65psi front on 28c Maxxis Padrone TR tires. You spoke of the acceleration of the bike earlier in the thread, and that is absolutely my experience; it's ridiculous how quickly it gets up to speed. This bike really likes going fast, and Padrones are super fast rolling.

    My only complaint is that I don't think road tubeless is quite there yet. I've got around 1100mi on the bike, and I've experienced two small (1/4-1/3") gashes on the rear. The sealant plugged them, but it's only stable around 40-45psi. Pump it up more, and it starts to open back up and bleed air until it stabilizes again at the lower pressure level. In both instances, I unmounted the tire, completely cleaned the sealant away from the gash area on the inside, and used a small piece of Gorilla tape as a patch (a Park tire boot just didn't do the trick). I then floated a bit of gel superglue (since it's got some elasticity to it) into the gash from the outside, pushed the gash shut, and remounted the tire an hour later. In both cases, it's held up well, but it's obvious that current sealant just can't keep up with the higher pressure requirements (I use Stan's, but Orange was no better). I've had zero problems out of the front tire, so my guess is that it's way more puncture/gash resistant with less weight on it.

    I've not once flatted on my tubeless mountain bikes or gravel bike, but those are much lower pressure; 38psi on 40c gravel tires, 22psi on 650b tires, and 7psi on the fatty), and they're all heavier casings, meant for abuse. The roads in my area are also not the best (lots of debris, including frequent broken glass), since my friends in more rural areas have had no issues at all. So, keep that all in mind when you're deciding on what approach you want to take, since you're not going to get light and fast rolling AND good puncture/gash resistance. I always ride with a spare tube, but both of my gashes occurred within limp home range.
    Good stuff. I tested the bike again before pulling the trigger yesterday and it's simply a great value at the price I found. It handles well, rolls smoothly, and is plenty stiff in the right places. The disc version also doesn't have the twitchiness that some people complained about on the original rim version due to the longer chainstays I believe. Try Schwalbe tires for your tubeless setup. I am like 500 miles in on my Ridley and I have not had one issue at all. Seriously, the Schwalbe Pro One is the only tire that currently interests me as a result. They are great. Check the reviews. I will definitely take a closer look at the wheels then and compare them to the Bontrager and Chain Reaction Cycle's Prime wheels. Thanks again!
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    It's an ad, but it's a fairly accurate one.

    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Good stuff. I tested the bike again before pulling the trigger yesterday and it's simply a great value at the price I found. It handles well, rolls smoothly, and is plenty stiff in the right places. The disc version also doesn't have the twitchiness that some people complained about on the original rim version due to the longer chainstays I believe. Try Schwalbe tires for your tubeless setup. I am like 500 miles in on my Ridley and I have not had one issue at all. Seriously, the Schwalbe Pro One is the only tire that currently interests me as a result. They are great. Check the reviews. I will definitely take a closer look at the wheels then and compare them to the Bontrager and Chain Reaction Cycle's Prime wheels. Thanks again!
    I briefly considered the Pro One, but I've read far too many bad reviews about poor puncture resistance and fast wearing. I have several friends who tried Hutchinsons, which seem to be hardier, but heavy and slow were the complaint. I took a gamble on the Padrone TRs, since they're still so new that there aren't many reviews out, but I've always been partial to Maxxis tires. I've had rotten luck with Schwalbe on the mountain bike, which jives with most of my friends' experiences, and that also kept me away. One my rural buddies is using the Pro One right now, though, so I'm waiting to hear a long term report, but once again the roads are cleaner and in better shape out his way.

    I feel like I need to save the fast rolling road tubeless for long rides out in the country, and have a training tired for the shorter weekday rides around me. It's just that changing tubeless tires is a big PITA.
    --Dave

    2017 Fuji SL Disc 1.1
    2015 Fuji Cross 3.0 LE
    2015 GT Sensor Comp
    2017 Salsa Beargrease NX

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    Quote Originally Posted by noodlesatf View Post
    I briefly considered the Pro One, but I've read far too many bad reviews about poor puncture resistance and fast wearing. I have several friends who tried Hutchinsons, which seem to be hardier, but heavy and slow were the complaint. I took a gamble on the Padrone TRs, since they're still so new that there aren't many reviews out, but I've always been partial to Maxxis tires. I've had rotten luck with Schwalbe on the mountain bike, which jives with most of my friends' experiences, and that also kept me away. One my rural buddies is using the Pro One right now, though, so I'm waiting to hear a long term report, but once again the roads are cleaner and in better shape out his way.

    I feel like I need to save the fast rolling road tubeless for long rides out in the country, and have a training tired for the shorter weekday rides around me. It's just that changing tubeless tires is a big PITA.
    At the end of the day, you have to do what you are comfortable with, but I have no qualms about recommending them. Again, I haven't had any issues and I have inadvertently ridden over all kinds of crap on the Silver Comet Trail, etc. Let me know what you eventually settle on.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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    Last edited by Rashadabd; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:09 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

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