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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    So in your new 25mm tires, put about 62 psi in the front and 78 psi in the rear.
    this may be right (i dunno), but it sure sounds low using 170 lbs of total bike weight.

    my total bike weight is 185-190, and calculators tell me 90 psi front and 110 psi rear on 23mm tires. but I don't follow that either. i inflate 'em to 95 and 100. always have, always will.

    i'm more worried about gravel in sharp turns than water, as my pasela sidewalls are soft for comfortable ride quality, and i've flatted before when the sidewall comes in contact with rocks.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  2. #27
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    there should be a sticky thread explaining the difference between

    grip versus traction

    because this topic comes up so often that there needs to be sticky, with authoritative links explaining the physics, or from guys who knows physics.

    The way it is, it's a little hard for me to read some of the explanations in here. I mean, really, I don't expect anyone to be an expert on tires, but at least attempt to post a link if you're unsure what you're talking about

    this topic is technical in nature, so the answer should be clear, and clear explanations are out there. The subject has been well studied and researched, there shouldn't be a need to guess on this matter. Google has a tons of links. This subject is one of the few subject that I will honestly say "go google it up". Plenty of MotoGP and Formula guys on the internet have post extensively about tires.

  3. #28
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    ^ I'd guess my total rider/bike weight is around 200lbs, and I run 90-95 rear, 80-85 front with 25c GP4000s. It's probably on the high side, but I don't like pinch flats and ride on gravel quite a bit. Everybody is different, but for me, it's still quite comfy.

    If you want to play it safe, I'd say the GP 4-seasons is a good compromise that's not as uncomfortable or poor-handling as something like a Gatorskin, but more durable than and almost as nice to ride as a GP4000. That said, I have run a 28c Gatorskin out back (they run narrow) and 25c 4-seasons up front, and it works well for rougher stuff.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by tijj View Post
    Thanks.. I was watching time trial tour de france and saw valverde crash around a wet curve..
    Watch this - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t46JY1ur8LA

    Speed is not too much of an issue for a non professional rider like me.. but safety is.. Im just getting into road bikes.. Please suggest a better tire with more traction and safety..
    Thank you guys !
    Valverde was going at maximum speed in very wet weather. You won't be pushing as close to the envelope as he was.

    You can definitely fit a 25 or 26mm tire on there as others said, and it will probably be more comfortable. No reason not to do that. It may even give you a greater margin of safety if you are doing a competitive TT in wet weather (greater contact area with the road).

    But again, a slightly bigger tire won't be the difference between crashing in usual conditions. Experience will be.


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  5. #30
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    Thanks to everyone who responded. It was really helpful. With a psi of 85 in the rear and 80 in the front and I will get the Grand Prix GP 4000s II Road Bike Tires 700c X 25..

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by nova_rider View Post
    Correct. Force will not change, but increased air pressure reduces a tire's contact patch, thus same force results in higher contact pressure between the tire and road.
    And unless the road is perfectly smooth, that higher pressure will result in reduced traction as the tire "bounces" off road imperfections.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    there should be a sticky thread explaining the difference between

    grip versus traction

    because this topic comes up so often that there needs to be sticky, with authoritative links explaining the physics, or from guys who knows physics.

    The way it is, it's a little hard for me to read some of the explanations in here. I mean, really, I don't expect anyone to be an expert on tires, but at least attempt to post a link if you're unsure what you're talking about

    this topic is technical in nature, so the answer should be clear, and clear explanations are out there. The subject has been well studied and researched, there shouldn't be a need to guess on this matter. Google has a tons of links. This subject is one of the few subject that I will honestly say "go google it up". Plenty of MotoGP and Formula guys on the internet have post extensively about tires.
    I agree my explanations are about as clear as mud . However, if everyone just posted a link to google there wouldn't be much purpose to a forum like this.

    Glad you settled on a set of tires tijj!

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    If you think a bicycle can hydroplane on wet roads you'd be confused.
    Bingo! Bikes don't hydroplane. Bike tires do not have a large enough contact area, no do they go fast enough to hydroplane unless you are going 50+ mph. If you are stupid enough to barrel your bike down a hill at 50mph on wet roads, nothing is going to save you. All of these "water channeling" directional bike tires you see on the market are a gimmick.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  9. #34
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    The "water channeling" tread is placed on the tire to make the rider feel more comfortable with his choice of tire.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalbiker View Post
    In addition to being one of the slowest rolling tires you could possibly buy, the gatorskins are horrendously hard and corner like you're on ice. I can't imagine how cheap those Vittorias were if you think the gatorskins are actually better. I would flat out refuse to ever ride a gatorskin tire, even if it were mounted on some $5000 Ligthweight wheelset or something.

    You're going to love the gp4000s. So much more superior in every single way.
    Gatorskins don't live up to their hype of puncture protection either. I've seen a few of these trashed by tiny pieces of broken glass.

    I still love my Maxxis Re-Fuses. A bit harsh, but bombproof. Reducing pressure lessens the harshness.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    there should be a sticky thread explaining the difference between

    grip versus traction

    because this topic comes up so often that there needs to be sticky, with authoritative links explaining the physics, or from guys who knows physics.

    The way it is, it's a little hard for me to read some of the explanations in here. I mean, really, I don't expect anyone to be an expert on tires, but at least attempt to post a link if you're unsure what you're talking about

    this topic is technical in nature, so the answer should be clear, and clear explanations are out there. The subject has been well studied and researched, there shouldn't be a need to guess on this matter. Google has a tons of links. This subject is one of the few subject that I will honestly say "go google it up". Plenty of MotoGP and Formula guys on the internet have post extensively about tires.
    Google can be good, but some sources are questionable. What makes you think another blog has any better info than you will find from us schmucks here?

    Reputable sources like from Sheldon Brown's site (though some info is outdated) or from Slowtwitch, are pretty good.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Gatorskins don't live up to their hype of puncture protection either. I've seen a few of these trashed by tiny pieces of broken glass.

    I still love my Maxxis Re-Fuses. A bit harsh, but bombproof. Reducing pressure lessens the harshness.
    I've had my 23mm Gatorskins for 2k miles with no flats. I used to live on a gravel road which is why I got the Gatorskins over the GP4000. I have some slices in the rubber on mine but nothing seemed to get through the construction of the tire. Still have about 1,000 miles left in the rear before I'm going to try something different. They are still far better than the Vittoria Pro Slicks that came on the bike but I know those are a cheap version of the their tires you'd buy in a shop. Gravel tore a huge hole in the sidewall of those after 500 miles of riding.

  13. #38
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    I used the Conti Gator Hardshell tires a lot the last 3 years, both on my gravel bike (28c) and road bike (25c). Never had a flat with them. One did develop of a bulging section though.

    However I recently put on some 25c GP4000 on my road bike and ... wow. Massive difference in rolling resistance and smoother ride. And I just got a flat with them too! I still have to side some gravel with the GP4000, but my flat happened on pavement.

    I am inclined to go tubeless eventually, but that will mean new wheels not just new tires.

  14. #39
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    Some people have had great luck with Gatorskins, some have had bad luck with them. I get that. What I don't get is at least two people here boasting how much more durable they are than Vittoria Pro Slicks. Isn't this an apples and oranges comparison? Vittoria Pro Slicks are not marketed as a puncture resistant tire from what I can see. They are an ultra-light race tire. New road bikes generally come with very light race tires so bike manufacturers can put a low weight figure on their bikes.

    Naturally, I would expect a "puncture resistant" tire to do things like....um....resist punctures better than a race tire.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Some people have had great luck with Gatorskins, some have had bad luck with them. I get that. What I don't get is at least two people here boasting how much more durable they are than Vittoria Pro Slicks. Isn't this an apples and oranges comparison? Vittoria Pro Slicks are not marketed as a puncture resistant tire from what I can see. They are an ultra-light race tire. New road bikes generally come with very light race tires so bike manufacturers can put a low weight figure on their bikes.

    Naturally, I would expect a "puncture resistant" tire to do things like....um....resist punctures better than a race tire.
    I think it was only me complaining about the Vittoria tires. They came on my Fuji and from what I gather its a completely different (cheaper) tire with the same name slapped on it. I assume to keep prices lower on new bikes. Its a lower TPI and a cheaper rubber. Those things rolled very stiff no matter what tire pressure and they had no feel in corners. In comparison the Gatorskins roll a lot smoother, faster and I can feel the front tire gripping the pavement on the mountain descents.

    After hearing other people's experience I might have to keep the Gatorskins for backup and get some GP4000s. It would be nice to have the direct comparison.

    Its the same on motorcycles (not to bring that up again). My GSX-R came with Bridgestone BT016 tires that lasted 7,000 miles. The new set of BT016s I replaced them with only lasted 3,000 miles but felt 10 times better through corners. Totally different construction and rubber compound. All of the miles were general street riding with some fun trips to the mountains.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    Its the same on motorcycles (not to bring that up again). My GSX-R came with Bridgestone BT016 tires that lasted 7,000 miles. The new set of BT016s I replaced them with only lasted 3,000 miles but felt 10 times better through corners. Totally different construction and rubber compound. All of the miles were general street riding with some fun trips to the mountains.
    Sort of reminds me why car snow tires have such a shorter life than other tires. Softer rubber, better grip, but wear out quickly.

    There isn't any tire that does everything well. Some tires do one or two things excellently while others do everything so-so.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  17. #42
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    The Pro Slick is not Vittoria's top quality tire (indeed, I hadn't paid it any attention before this thread). The Corsa G+ and Corsa Speed G+ are their racing tires - 320 tpi with a new graphene tread compound. They are not flat resistant but are very grippy and offer a supremely comfortable ride.

    I used the Corsa CX for years and when they replaced that with the Corsa G+ I was skeptical but have come to like the new one just as much. I will not, however, compare it to a puncture resistant tire like the Gatorskin or Bontrager Hardcase (which I use on my commuter bike).
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

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