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  1. #1
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    Cool Added to my expensive parts graveyard...

    I demolished my rear wheel on a group ride last Saturday. Stood up to sprint on a kicker, and POW! Rub-rub-rub-rub-rub-rub...

    I snapped a spoke like a piece of thread. The wheel was potatochipped so bad, it would not fit through the frame, even with some emergency truing measures. That's what I get for commenting that I had never broken a spoke...

    Luckily, I was riding with a group, and just hoofed it (3 miles...in cycling shoes, carrying my bike) to a gas station and waited 2 hours for one of them to come back and pick me up.

    I'll tell you, it kinda sucks being the burly sprinter type in a very hilly area. I break stuff right and left...in less than 2 years, I have broken 3 chains, a wheel, 2 freehubs (ground the cogs through the splines), a quick release (yes while riding, not while letting a gorilla fix my flat), a cleat (snapped the nose off while pulling up), and even a carbon shoe sole-plate. Plus, I am tired of all these bird-boned riders hiding in my draft and then passing on the climbs. From now on, all rides will be preceded by feats of strength like loosening a frozen bottom bracket or setting a headset...with your bare hands!

  2. #2
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    Hate to say it, but I reckon you'll need a tighter maintenance and replacement program if you're doing that much strain to your gear!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bird View Post
    I'll tell you, it kinda sucks being the burly sprinter type in a very hilly area. I break stuff right and left..
    Sounds like you're on a bike that just isn't designed to take your weight.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bird View Post
    I demolished my rear wheel on a group ride last Saturday. Stood up to sprint on a kicker, and POW! Rub-rub-rub-rub-rub-rub...

    I snapped a spoke like a piece of thread. The wheel was potatochipped so bad, it would not fit through the frame, even with some emergency truing measures. That's what I get for commenting that I had never broken a spoke...

    Luckily, I was riding with a group, and just hoofed it (3 miles...in cycling shoes, carrying my bike) to a gas station and waited 2 hours for one of them to come back and pick me up.

    I'll tell you, it kinda sucks being the burly sprinter type in a very hilly area. I break stuff right and left...in less than 2 years, I have broken 3 chains, a wheel, 2 freehubs (ground the cogs through the splines), a quick release (yes while riding, not while letting a gorilla fix my flat), a cleat (snapped the nose off while pulling up), and even a carbon shoe sole-plate. Plus, I am tired of all these bird-boned riders hiding in my draft and then passing on the climbs. From now on, all rides will be preceded by feats of strength like loosening a frozen bottom bracket or setting a headset...with your bare hands!
    You need a support vehicle with spare wheels and bikes to follow you around

  5. #5
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    At the crit yesterday, some dude slid out on a fast corner, easily 30 MPH or so. Hit a pylon (protected by a hay bale) and he flew over the pylon. The rider was fine, but his titanium Litespeed was brokeded at the headtube/toptube/downtube area.

    /Not talking about my own bike/experiences.
    Man up, dumb down, and do one gear.

    /AYHSMB

  6. #6
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    Nicole has the answer.

    Regarding the broken spoke: Try building the real wheel with an offset rim such as the Velocity Aerohead O/C. While it's virtually impossible to overload individual spokes-they typically fail from long term fatigue-you can vastly improve how well the spokes of your rear wheels share the load by using an offset rim, which more closely equalizes tension between the drive and non-drive side spokes.

    Since you're such a component breaker, I'd suggest each time you break a component you suspect is a result of your grunt, that you replace it with the next burliest part. For instance, you may have to consider swapping from your existing pedals to an ATB style pedal due to it's steel cleat.

    Good luck, and DON'T ride MY bike!

  7. #7
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    One time I broke a spoke 20 miles into a 100 mile ride. I was carrying a Fiberfix temporary spoke which allowed me complete the ride.

    http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fiberfix.htm

  8. #8
    Old, slow, and fat.
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    That broken spoke thing rings bells...

    I've had buddies that've raced on 35 spoke wheels. I've ridden an hour's ride on a 31 spoke wheel. That one popped within a mile of home and I didn't want to stop. What can I say? Loosen the bakes and don't take crit-style turns and its OK.

    While the guys that I ride with that are under 150# can get away with training on low spoke count wheels, I'll stick with 32h Open Pro-style wheels thankyouverymuch

    To the OP: you may be a candidate for a 32f/36r wheelset. Oh, and I know all about towing the little guys to the bottom of the hill at 25mph + to have em ride away from me once the road goes uphill. Nothing you can do about it except attack em till they can't hang.

    M
    I've moved back to NoVA. PLEASE change the weather!

  9. #9
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    I'm in the bike doesn't fit your weight category. I'm big as well, 6'2" 235lbs and can mash a peddle with anyone on a sprint (I still play a lot of league basketball) my friends call me a t-rex for big legs small arms. I've yet to break a spoke or a chain in 4-5 years of peddling on Dura Ace components and Kysirium SSL rims (in fact I'm not sure I've even had the shop tell me my wheels were all that much out of true). Now my bike goes into the shop every winter for a complete overhaul and cleaning (hence my truing comment).

    Make sure your not on a weight limited bike or wheels...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MShaw View Post
    That broken spoke thing rings bells...

    I've had buddies that've raced on 35 spoke wheels. I've ridden an hour's ride on a 31 spoke wheel.
    ^^^
    side note/Incorrect spoke tension can cause 32's and 36's to fail as well. Just make certain that the wheels are examined for correct tension periodically.

    As for the original poster, it could be an issue with the wheel he's using not properly dished and aligned for his frame. I've seen club riders switching out different wheels between bikes noting the rear wheel was not aligned correctly. I don't know if this could cause an issue or not ...but it doesn't seem to be too healthy for how the bicycle tracks. They'll usually visually align the rear wheel but that's fail in my book if it's not dished correctly for their set-up.

    //side note: small piece of masking tape a few spokes front/rear to your down tube.

  11. #11
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    How many spokes on that sucker?

    One broken spoke and you can't get it through the frame? I've broken spokes on 32-spoke wheels plenty of times and never seen one go that far out. Sounds like you need a wheel with more spokes.

  12. #12
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    If I was that big and strong, I wouln't own a single piece of weight conscious equipment, from wheels to frame and everything in between. I'd add the extra 2-3 pounds to my bike and never think twice. I don't happen to be either big or strong, so I never break anything.

  13. #13
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    simply being big and strong does NOT mean "I'm going to break a bunch of stuff on my bike". I'm way on the north side of 200lb, and I'll put up my power numbers against just about anyone, but I'm not breaking schitt every day. Yeah, I've had a few parts fail -- over the last 30 years -- but the number of failures that the OP talks about in such a short time frame indicates than one or more factors are in play:


    *Riding low-end parts that are simply not designed to take the stresses of "real" riding

    *Riding light weight parts not designed to be abused by a clyde (low spoke count/hi-tension spokes?)

    *Failure to maintain bike and parts in good working order.

    *Riding form/technique that's so bad that the bike, drivetrain and wheels are being subjected to forces outside the range that could be expected from a rider with good technique.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    People who say, "Laughter is the best medicine.." have never been on the receiving end of a morphine drip..

    ноожеяз ай вщоw?
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    A fool and his money were damned lucky to have bumped into each other in the first place.

  14. #14
    Hai.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustTooBig View Post
    *Failure to maintain bike and parts in good working order.

    *Riding form/technique that's so bad that the bike, drivetrain and wheels are being subjected to forces outside the range that could be expected from a rider with good technique.
    I agree. One of my teammates is around 250 pounds and he rides a carbon bike, race wheels, etc. It's not a weight-weenie bike, but it is meant to be a race bike.

    He keeps his bike in great condition, and the only time I've seen him break stuff is when he ran over someone in a pile-up at a crit a while ago. In that incident, the fork broke in half -- one leg looked like it had slid out of the aluminum sleeve on the crown, and the other leg shattered. Other than that, the bike was perfectly fine. Even the front wheel was hardly damaged. One or two bent spokes, but nothing that wasn't easily repairable.

    OP, bikes are a lot tougher than we give them credit for. My road bike is a low-end, entry level chunk of metal, and I'd say that I abuse it a bit. The wheels are ****, the derailleurs are heavy ****, etc. However, I keep my bike in immaculate condition. My wheels are both properly tensioned and trued and dished, I keep the drivetrain clean, tires properly inflated, all the good stuff.

    You wanna know the biggest maintenance project I have planned for that bike? I have to re-wrap the handlebar because I lost a bar plug while riding one day, which allowed the tape to slacken for a few minutes before I was able to go back and pick up the bar plug.
    Man up, dumb down, and do one gear.

    /AYHSMB

  15. #15
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bird View Post

    I'll tell you, it kinda sucks being the burly sprinter type in a very hilly area. I break stuff right and left...in less than 2 years, I have broken 3 chains, a wheel, 2 freehubs (ground the cogs through the splines), a quick release (yes while riding, not while letting a gorilla fix my flat), a cleat (snapped the nose off while pulling up), and even a carbon shoe sole-plate. Plus, I am tired of all these bird-boned riders hiding in my draft and then passing on the climbs. From now on, all rides will be preceded by feats of strength like loosening a frozen bottom bracket or setting a headset...with your bare hands!
    why and where did the chains break? it's pretty rare anyone just flat breaks a chain because they push on the pedals hard. did it break while shifting? did it break at the pin?

    alloy freehubs=bad idea. you know that now.

    broken clean...worn cleat? and you were pulling up? why? sorry, don't mean to sound like an ass, but normally 'pulling up' isn't part of the power stroke...all that does is make your rear wheel go places it shouldn't go.

    carbon shoe sole, that sounds like big power unless there was some damage to it, but hard to imagine you could damage it enough to really make a difference.

    like some of the other posters stated, i know plenty of guys that make huge watts and they don't break parts at all, much less on a regular basis. sounds like you need to replace things like chains and cleats more often. i do sprint events at the track, and i won't use those shoes for anything else because i don't want to replace cleats so often. any time there is wear on them, i replace them. i'm not big, but i can make pretty much 1500w doing a standing start and i've never broken any of the things you have. for sure i'd recommend wheels w/ at least 28-32 spokes, that way if you break one you'll be able to true it and ride it home.
    Last edited by cxwrench; 04-13-2012 at 06:16 AM.
    i work for some bike racers...
    2013 Trek Madone 5.9 w/ '12 SRAM Red
    2010 Cervelo T1 sprint bike
    Ruger 10-22TD
    Smith&Wesson M&P 15-22
    Smith&Wesson M&P 9
    oh, those belong in another forum

  16. #16
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    I don't know how big "burly" is in pounds and realistically, it's not business and I don't want to know. But it goes through my mind that if someone weighs not just 250, but maybe 275 (or you fill in the number) he might not be just pushing the design limits but just plain over them. Lots of materials have limits of elasticity and the limits can be fairly sharp. Parts can take just so much force -- and do it over and over -- but just not one ounce more before they begin to fail, e.g., the spring that will no longer return or the static element that takes a permanent bend or just breaks.

    With so many parts getting broken, I'm guessing someone at the LBS would have suggested better maintenance if it seemed like that was the problem. What business ever misses the chance to explain that it's your fault? But I don't think they would necessarily have told a customer that he was too heavy for the bike. I think they would be really shy about possibly insulting the customer.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bird View Post
    ..in less than 2 years..!
    You've been riding less than 2 years?

    Are you a "spinner" or a "masher / stomper" ? Masher / stompers are tough on equipment. Learn to spin.

    When you shift, do you momentarily soft-pedal til the shift completes? If you keep stomping while shifting, yeah, you're gonna break chains and war out cassettes fast.

    When you hit a bump, do you rise slightly off the saddle, and flex your arms to absorb it? Learn to "flow" over rough pavement, "float" over the bike while pedaling. Road bikes don't have shocks, because your body is supposed to be the shock absorber. Don't beat up your bike by making it carry your full weight across bumps.

    Also: if you're over 200 you really should be riding on stout wheels with at least 32 spokes in the rear, and 25c tires with a bit less pressure in them.
    * posted by Creakybot 2013 all rights reserved.
    * not actually waterproof.

  18. #18
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    To me it sounds like some of these issues are caused by rider issues such as not shifting properly, not tightening things properly, etc more than component failure alone. For example broken chains - a properly maintained and good shape chain simply won't break unless you're powershifting or something.

  19. #19
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    Do you put out more watts than Cavendish? Seriously. No? Then your issues are equipment selection, equipment maintenance and user error.

    I say user error - not to be a dick - but to highlight how easy it is to snap a chain if you shift incorrectly. My peak watts are respectable but nothing of note (1440) and I've NEVER snapped a chain or popped a spoke on the road bike. I have however snapped many chains on the mountain bike. Every one of those was 100% my fault - tight switchback, too high of a gear, shift under load: POW!

    What makes it frustrating - I know better. I can stand, hammer and shift without any issue - that slight easing up just as the chain moves up the cog... 999 times out of a 1,000, it's fine...

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldguybikingnewb View Post
    I'm in the bike doesn't fit your weight category. I'm big as well, 6'2" 235lbs and can mash a peddle with anyone on a sprint (I still play a lot of league basketball) my friends call me a t-rex for big legs small arms. I've yet to break a spoke or a chain in 4-5 years of peddling on Dura Ace components and Kysirium SSL rims (in fact I'm not sure I've even had the shop tell me my wheels were all that much out of true). Now my bike goes into the shop every winter for a complete overhaul and cleaning (hence my truing comment).

    Make sure your not on a weight limited bike or wheels...
    In general, none of my components except the saddle have a published weight limit. I am about 10 lbs under the saddle's limit. I think an additional component to the equation is the terrain around here. I ride in the hills around Pittsburgh, and I was one of the heaviest finishers of the Dirty Dozen. I am cranking up hills for the vast majority of my rides.

    This is me on Canton Avenue, the steepest road in the world.


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustTooBig View Post
    simply being big and strong does NOT mean "I'm going to break a bunch of stuff on my bike". I'm way on the north side of 200lb, and I'll put up my power numbers against just about anyone, but I'm not breaking schitt every day. Yeah, I've had a few parts fail -- over the last 30 years -- but the number of failures that the OP talks about in such a short time frame indicates than one or more factors are in play:


    *Riding low-end parts that are simply not designed to take the stresses of "real" riding

    *Riding light weight parts not designed to be abused by a clyde (low spoke count/hi-tension spokes?)

    *Failure to maintain bike and parts in good working order.

    *Riding form/technique that's so bad that the bike, drivetrain and wheels are being subjected to forces outside the range that could be expected from a rider with good technique.
    I ride Ultegra components, plus an FSA crankset. Only the wheels were lowish quality, Vuelta Corsa Super Lites, which are also the only component that fits into your second point, since they are 1440g.

    Your last two are not applicable.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    why and wear did the chains break? it's pretty rare anyone just flat breaks a chain because they push on the pedals hard. did it break while shifting? did it break at the pin?

    alloy freehubs=bad idea. you know that now.

    broken clean...worn cleat? and you were pulling up? why? sorry, don't mean to sound like an ass, but normally 'pulling up' isn't part of the power stroke...all that does is make your rear wheel go places it shouldn't go.

    carbon shoe sole, that sounds like big power unless there was some damage to it, but hard to imagine you could damage it enough to really make a difference.

    like some of the other posters stated, i know plenty of guys that make huge watts and they don't break parts at all, much less on a regular basis. sounds like you need to replace things like chains and cleats more often. i do sprint events at the track, and i won't use those shoes for anything else because i don't want to replace cleats so often. any time there is wear on them, i replace them. i'm not big, but i can make pretty much 1500w doing a standing start and i've never broken any of the things you have. for sure i'd recommend wheels w/ at least 28-32 spokes, that way if you break one you'll be able to true it and ride it home.
    One of the chains broke while shifting, one at the sacraficial pin, and one at an arbitrary spot in the chain.

    I know about alloy freehubs, I wish that they made a steel freehub for those wheels. It would be worth it even if it was WAY heavier.

    The cleat broke while pulling up...while cranking up a hill at a low cadence/big power. I was not at 30 mph and jumping the bike around.

    The shoe was definitely a power thing. I hopped on the pedals and went for an all out sprint. Here is a photo.



    I am also capable of big power numbers, and I maintain my equipment well. The chains, for instance, were all under 1000 miles when they bit it.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    I don't know how big "burly" is in pounds and realistically, it's not business and I don't want to know. But it goes through my mind that if someone weighs not just 250, but maybe 275 (or you fill in the number) he might not be just pushing the design limits but just plain over them. Lots of materials have limits of elasticity and the limits can be fairly sharp. Parts can take just so much force -- and do it over and over -- but just not one ounce more before they begin to fail, e.g., the spring that will no longer return or the static element that takes a permanent bend or just breaks.

    With so many parts getting broken, I'm guessing someone at the LBS would have suggested better maintenance if it seemed like that was the problem. What business ever misses the chance to explain that it's your fault? But I don't think they would necessarily have told a customer that he was too heavy for the bike. I think they would be really shy about possibly insulting the customer.
    By burly, I mean muscular with wide shoulders, not fat. I am 5'9", 205 lbs, and 12% BF.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bird View Post
    In general, none of my components except the saddle have a published weight limit. I am about 10 lbs under the saddle's limit. I think an additional component to the equation is the terrain around here. I ride in the hills around Pittsburgh, and I was one of the heaviest finishers of the Dirty Dozen. I am cranking up hills for the vast majority of my rides.
    Ten pounds under the saddle limit? Geez, who worries about the limit for a saddle? And you spend most of your time standing on the pedals going up hills? Instead of asking why you break chains and stuff, can I ask why you're surprised that happens?

    You are subjecting your bike to loads it wasn't designed for. You need something designed for the load. For example, you might have drop back to an 8-speed cassette to accommodate a bigger, heavier chain. It's that or expect to keep breaking and replacing parts.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Bird View Post
    I'll tell you, it kinda sucks being the burly sprinter type in a very hilly area. I break stuff right and left...in less than 2 years, I have broken 3 chains, a wheel, 2 freehubs (ground the cogs through the splines), a quick release (yes while riding, not while letting a gorilla fix my flat), a cleat (snapped the nose off while pulling up), and even a carbon shoe sole-plate.
    O.k., let's inject a dose of reality here:

    First, breaking chains: It is pretty much impossible for a rider on a normal road bike to break a chain by sheer strength. Tensile strength for a high-quality 10-speed chain is about 2200 pounds. Let's say that in the small ring you have roughly a 2:1 advantage, that means you'll have to slam a thousand pounds into those pedals. Even if you push and pull at the same time, that's close to impossible to do. Well, unless you weigh upwards of 500 pounds, that is... You'd probably snap off your handlebars at the same time as well in that case. Not speaking of all sort of other problems you'd have...

    Second: "Grinding the cogs through the spline": Absolutely, positively, no way in hell this can ever happen, unless you forget to tighten the cassette lockring. If that's the case, then all bets are off, but then the issue is wildly incompetent maintenance/assembly, not your weight or strength. Oh, and if you used Campagnolo parts, then this wouldn't happen even with a loose lockring, although you'd still ruin the freehub, of course.

    Now, snapping a cleat nose off while pulling up, that I can imagine, depending on cleat brand, temperature, and age of the cleat. My advice would be to change cleats regularly, and buy high-quality ones.

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