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  1. #1
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    advice for the new guy

    I'm not even a beginner yet because the last time I was on a bike was about 30 years ago, but I've recently moved to a new area where I see more cyclists than I do runners on local fitness trails. I'm looking for a bike to grow into that would not need to be replaced in two years. What road bike would you suggest?

  2. #2
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    My advise would be to buy a entry level bike that fits you. Do some research on bike fit, and measure yourself. Find a store that carries entry level road bikes (someone can help me here but I'm thinking in the $750 range?) and advise on fit also. As you get fitter in a couple of years, more flexible and used to being on the bike, you most probably will want something a little better, and your fit may change too, It may take that long. With what you have told us, don't be looking for a forever bike just yet.
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  3. #3
    Cranky Old Bastard
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    Yes, go around to all the bike shops in your area, talk with them and see what they have. Ask lots of questions and judge the shop by how they treat you.
    Make sure that whatever shop you buy from will fit the bike to you; that is more important than which bike you buy.

    There are different styes of road bikes depending on what you want to do. There are race bikes with aggressive handling but many beginners prefer those with more relaxed (comfort) geometry. Go to the manufacturers' websites to learn more about the models that you're interested in.
    Cross bikes are popular because they're a road bike that you can also use for easy off-roading like dirt and gravel trails.

    Budget for the extras also. You'll need a helmet and eventually shorts, shoes, gloves, etc.

    It's probably best to not spend a lot on your first bike because you'll learn quickly and change your idea of which bike is "perfect" for you.
    "When you know absolutely nothing, anyone who knows 1% more than nothing sounds like an expert."

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tulsa_Brian View Post
    I'm not even a beginner yet because the last time I was on a bike was about 30 years ago, but I've recently moved to a new area where I see more cyclists than I do runners on local fitness trails. I'm looking for a bike to grow into that would not need to be replaced in two years. What road bike would you suggest?
    There are few questions we'd like for you to answer, before we can make any recommendations: 1) What's your budget?...2) Will you be primarily riding on paved or dirt roads?...3) What distance would you typically be riding?....4) Will you be commuting at all?
    A chromoly steel bicycle will last just as long as titanium, if kept dry.

  5. #5
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    Get a bike that can take 700x28 tires. I would prefer to ride with this size but my bike frame, Trek 4.5 can only take a maximum size of 700x25. The larger tire will provide a smoother ride, and is less prone to getting flats. I got one flat in about 8 years on my old bike. Unless you are a competitive rider where speed is everything, go with a larger size tire.

    I would also test ride bikes from a bike shop that will permit it, to see what size frame is a best fit. I ride a 58, and a 56 feels cramped while a 54 is very uncomfortable. See what size is best for you.

    Also, put some good tires on the bike. My new Trek came with garbage tires. Don't ask me why, but you can spend thousands of dollars on a new bike and for some reason the companies put on trash tires.

    You can find the good tires by searching threads on the topic on this forum.

  6. #6
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    Randy raised a point I meant to ask. Are your fitness trails all nicely paved? If so, then road bike is OK. If not, or if you have some gravel trails for instance, then a hybrid/cross type bike that can take fatter tires is a better choice, and provides you with more flexibility as to where you ride.
    There's sometimes a buggy.
    How many drivers does a buggy have?

    One.

    So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
    and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

  7. #7
    Samfujiabq
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeet View Post
    There are few questions we'd like for you to answer, before we can make any recommendations: 1) What's your budget?...2) Will you be primarily riding on paved or dirt roads?...3) What distance would you typically be riding?....4) Will you be commuting at all?
    I agree with this but the rest,,,mmmm not so much.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samfujiabq View Post
    I agree with this but the rest,,,mmmm not so much.
    Could you be more specific, please?
    A chromoly steel bicycle will last just as long as titanium, if kept dry.

  9. #9
    Samfujiabq
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    Sure if a person new to running asked me advise about gettin into running,I wouldn't tell him to go out and buy a cheap 25.00 pair of shoes to see if he liked it.He would friggin hate it and probably never go again,equipment is important in every sport,and that's why I think the last question was a good one.If he can afford a better mid range bicycle,he'd be happier.I still have my first road bike and still use it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samfujiabq View Post
    Sure if a person new to running asked me advise about gettin into running,I wouldn't tell him to go out and buy a cheap 25.00 pair of shoes to see if he liked it.He would friggin hate it and probably never go again,equipment is important in every sport,and that's why I think the last question was a good one.If he can afford a better mid range bicycle,he'd be happier.I still have my first road bike and still use it.
    I don't get it...So where do you think I've gone wrong here?
    A chromoly steel bicycle will last just as long as titanium, if kept dry.

  11. #11
    Samfujiabq
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeet View Post
    I don't get it...So where do you think I've gone wrong here?
    Where are you not gettin it.I agree with you.I said the other comments I didn't agree with,a 795.00 road bike,,no I don't agree so the op should say what his budget is,like what you asked.

  12. #12
    Samfujiabq
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samfujiabq View Post
    Where are you not gettin it.I agree with you.I said the other comments I didn't agree with,a 795.00 road bike,,no I don't agree so the op should say what his budget is,like what you asked.
    Might as well advise him to get a huffy!so he can huffy and puffy up small grades and hate iy

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samfujiabq View Post
    Where are you not gettin it.I agree with you.I said the other comments I didn't agree with,a 795.00 road bike,,no I don't agree so the op should say what his budget is,like what you asked.
    Quote Originally Posted by Samfujiabq View Post
    Might as well advise him to get a huffy!so he can huffy and puffy up small grades and hate iy
    I'm sorry! That's my mistake! For some reason, I thought you weren't agreeing with something I had previously stated...But yes! You're right! We agree with one another!
    A chromoly steel bicycle will last just as long as titanium, if kept dry.

  14. #14
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    Runner looking to cross train on a bike every other day. I'm looking to put in around 20-30(probably more eventually) each ride. Like in running my focus is less on extending my distances and more on increase the rate in which I get to the same distance. With that said... I'm looking to buy a bike and I have approximately $1400 to spend. That doesn't mean I want to spend that much, but I'm willing too. I've been tossing around the idea of a new 2013 Caad10 4 or a used Super six. I want a bike that i'm not going to have to replace for 5+ years. Anywho any assistance or advice would help. Thank you in advance.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpinFast View Post
    Runner looking to cross train on a bike every other day. I'm looking to put in around 20-30(probably more eventually) each ride. Like in running my focus is less on extending my distances and more on increase the rate in which I get to the same distance. With that said... I'm looking to buy a bike and I have approximately $1400 to spend. That doesn't mean I want to spend that much, but I'm willing too. I've been tossing around the idea of a new 2013 Caad10 4 or a used Super six. I want a bike that i'm not going to have to replace for 5+ years. Anywho any assistance or advice would help. Thank you in advance.
    I would strongly recommend the following: 1) The Giant Defy 1 2) The GT Corsa 1.0 3) The Jamis Coda Comp ....* Otherwise, I would not recommend purchasing a used carbon fiber bike of any kind. CF conceals damage very well. Many cyclists who have previously crashed their bikes, would prefer to sell their used crashed bike, without fully disclosing their crashed CF bike to unsuspecting buyers. Cycling on a previously crashed CF bike can be very dangerous!
    A chromoly steel bicycle will last just as long as titanium, if kept dry.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tulsa_Brian View Post
    ..... I'm looking for a bike to grow into that would not need to be replaced in two years. What road bike would you suggest?
    Ether use your favorite search site or the old fashion yellow pages to find and check out the Local Bicycle Shops [aka: LBS's]. Shop... ask questions of the staff... take a few bicycles for a test ride. For many of us.... that's all it takes.
    If I didn't bicycle when the weather is bad... I wouldn't be a cyclist. I'd just be another old fat man... with a bicycle hanging in his garage.

    Urban Cycling.... Overcome your fears (a YouTube Link).
    Learn to cycle in traffic
    Or... just HTFU

  17. #17
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    A proper rental might be a good idea (if available). If possible, try to be fairly sure road cycling is something you're truly interested in and isn't just a passing fancy, then spend accordingly. Personally, I would advise against settling and get what you truly can afford (and maybe a bit more if necessary). Otherwise as your interest and skill grows, so does your budget to upgrade this-that-and-whatnot. Just my 2 pennies...

  18. #18
    Samfujiabq
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    Quote Originally Posted by octobahn View Post
    A proper rental might be a good idea (if available). If possible, try to be fairly sure road cycling is something you're truly interested in and isn't just a passing fancy, then spend accordingly. Personally, I would advise against settling and get what you truly can afford (and maybe a bit more if necessary). Otherwise as your interest and skill grows, so does your budget to upgrade this-that-and-whatnot. Just my 2 pennies...
    I agree,but I think once he puts his butt on a decent bike he'll love as much as most of us.I love it and Ill ride until I'm no longer physically able to,or a car gets which ever comes first!

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