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  1. #1
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    Thumbs down Aero Bars in a Paceline

    Before you get too vocal over the obvious faux pas here, spare a thought for the skill involved in keeping it together enough to get the bike off the road




    Happy to report there were only a couple of minor scratches.

  2. #2
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    Yup, he didn't bring anybody else down with him and was able to and just barely get the bike into the grass, where it appears he applied too much brake and endo'd. He probably had time to get back on the road, but that's hard to judge and do sometimes. Had he had a lot of mt. bike time, he might have pulled it off.

    The lack of other participants says well for the handling skill of those behind him.

    And I may be wrong but they look like they're doing maybe low 20's at best, but I wasn't there.

    Wasn't the finest example of riding skills I've ever seen and if ever anyone needed to actually SEE why you don't ride the aero bars in a paceline, well here it is.

    SB

  3. #3
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    Another reason not to ride with Tri geeks.

  4. #4
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    Looked more like a reason not to overlap wheels. And no way they were going 34mph.

  5. #5
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    One of his hands was already in the drops. Not saying it was then rendered to be "pie", but still.

  6. #6
    turtle killer.
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    Assuming those spokes busted during contact (and I am from the sound), that's a hell of a job keeping it upright as long as he did.

  7. #7
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    All I'll add, since I've said my peace in the other thread is this....If you are not comfortable in your aero bars while in a paceline...don't race in TTT's.

    I've been part of 3 OBRA state championship TTT teams and have been in a rotating paceline at over 30mph for much of the race...all on TT bikesand in the aero bars the whole race, aside from the corners (last year averaged just over 28 mph for 27.3 miles).

    Just because some people can't do it, doesn't mean everybody can't do it....I'm done with this thread
    Bikes:
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B.
    Yup, he didn't bring anybody else down with him and was able to and just barely get the bike into the grass, where it appears he applied too much brake and endo'd. He probably had time to get back on the road, but that's hard to judge and do sometimes. Had he had a lot of mt. bike time, he might have pulled it off.

    SB
    By that time his wheel had turned into a 700cm floppy pancake. I don't know if he braked but it's just as likely the wheel locked up on the brakes

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B.
    And I may be wrong but they look like they're doing maybe low 20's at best, but I wasn't there.
    SB
    Yea, I admit it looks slower but the lead guy looked at his speedo right beforehand, that's where I got the 34 from. It's also a downhill and leading up to the last sprint of the ride - will have to revisit to confirm...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookiebiker
    All I'll add, since I've said my peace in the other thread is this....If you are not comfortable in your aero bars while in a paceline...don't race in TTT's.

    I've been part of 3 OBRA state championship TTT teams and have been in a rotating paceline at over 30mph for much of the race...all on TT bikesand in the aero bars the whole race, aside from the corners (last year averaged just over 28 mph for 27.3 miles).

    Just because some people can't do it, doesn't mean everybody can't do it....I'm done with this thread
    Need I remind you about the '09 TDF TTT? Between BBox and the Australian corner, not sure if I've seen the absolute cahrnage like that.

  10. #10
    Teach me how to Bucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B.
    Yup, he didn't bring anybody else down with him and was able to and just barely get the bike into the grass, where it appears he applied too much brake and endo'd.
    SB
    He was doing good until he hit the gravel driveway. The wheel sinks in slightly which suddenly adds to the braking forces and lets the front brake lock.

    Another 20 feet of grass and he would have got it stopped upright.
    "Why don't these people grow up, bicycles are for children, & trained animals. Get off the roads, and you won't get run over. These freaks with their space clothes speeding down the streets hit people all the time. I won't drive in your bike lane, you stay the hell off the road." Mervin Bell of Galloway, OH.

    -Special thanks to osteomark for the avatar

  11. #11
    duh...
    Reputation: FatTireFred's Avatar
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    the lesson there is 'don't overlap wheels'... the surprise header at the end was entertaining
    .


    Quote Originally Posted by mikagsd
    Fat tire Fred....you are the bike god of the universe and unless someone agrees with your reasoning they are just plain stupid

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmm beer
    By that time his wheel had turned into a 700cm floppy pancake.
    700cm That's one huge pancake. lol peace!

  13. #13
    Old and Fixed, Moderator
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    After he went off the road, it looks to me like he hit a hole in the dirt...if it wasn't for that, he might of stayed upright
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  14. #14
    Rub it............
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    It doesn't look like he had his hand on the front brake hood at all. He still had it on the aerobars. I think he broke a spoke or 2 and combined with the detour off road, the wheel snagged on the front brake and flipped him.
    You can't fix stupid.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeDaddio

    I kind of wish it were legal to staple people in the face.

  15. #15
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    There was no skill involved here. He allowed himself to overlap wheels, and suffered the consequences when the leading rider changed his line.

    He was certainly lucky to stay upright. Had he been on his hoods or drops with both hands, this may not have happened as he would have been better able to adjust his speed. Just another reason not to use aerobars on group rides, but more importantly: This video shows exactly why you shouldn't overlap wheels.

  16. #16
    Looking for my Amish Love
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    Just more proof to avoid Tri-geeks. No using aero extensions in the paceline!
    Capt_Phun's Riding Blog:
    http://captphun.blogspot.com/

  17. #17
    Squirrel Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmm beer
    Before you get too vocal over the obvious faux pas here...
    Which one? There were a few.

    1) Lead rider (camera boy) did not pull off to the right when there was plenty of pavement. Not sure if it was time for him to pull off, if number two guy was impatient or if camera boy was coasting downhill while in the lead position (which is a No No).
    2) Number two rider pulled around the leader (camera) instead of waiting for the elbow wag to pull through, thus making the entire paceline deviate from its course. In addition he went way wide almost to the center line instead of passing closely.
    3) New number two rider (in black) was too impatient to let the new leader settle into a pace and looked like he was trying to swoop around and pass him, thus deviating from his line and hooking our unlucky victim.
    4) A few more spokes (like 32) in the wheel and the victim may have kept it upright.
    5) But of course the real Loser is the victim stupid enough to be in his aerobars in the middle of a paceline. Too bad, so sad.

    Quote Originally Posted by capt_phun
    Just more proof to avoid Tri-geeks. No using aero extensions in the paceline!
    Yeah, the bad thing is they often suck in and out of the aerobars.
    Luck is the intersection of preparation and opportunity.

  18. #18
    duh...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keeping up with Junior
    Which one? There were a few.

    1) Lead rider (camera boy) did not pull off to the right when there was plenty of pavement. Not sure if it was time for him to pull off, if number two guy was impatient or if camera boy was coasting downhill while in the lead position (which is a No No).
    2) Number two rider pulled around the leader (camera) instead of waiting for the elbow wag to pull through, thus making the entire paceline deviate from its course. In addition he went way wide almost to the center line instead of passing closely.
    3) New number two rider (in black) was too impatient to let the new leader settle into a pace and looked like he was trying to swoop around and pass him, thus deviating from his line and hooking our unlucky victim.
    4) A few more spokes (like 32) in the wheel and the victim may have kept it upright.
    5) But of course the real Loser is the victim stupid enough to be in his aerobars in the middle of a paceline. Too bad, so sad.



    Yeah, the bad thing is they often suck in and out of the aerobars.


    tri-geeks (bottle behind saddle, sleeveless jersey)- what were you expecting???
    .


    Quote Originally Posted by mikagsd
    Fat tire Fred....you are the bike god of the universe and unless someone agrees with your reasoning they are just plain stupid

  19. #19
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    This really doesn't seem like a skill issue. You have to have access to a brake if you're riding close other bicycles. He didn't, everything snowballed from there.

    Wookie, do you paceline without access to brakes like this?


    BTW, the dude's front wheel locked up - that was no pothole.

  20. #20
    ChicagoRoadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookiebiker
    All I'll add, since I've said my peace in the other thread is this....If you are not comfortable in your aero bars while in a paceline...don't race in TTT's.

    I've been part of 3 OBRA state championship TTT teams and have been in a rotating paceline at over 30mph for much of the race...all on TT bikesand in the aero bars the whole race, aside from the corners (last year averaged just over 28 mph for 27.3 miles).

    Just because some people can't do it, doesn't mean everybody can't do it....I'm done with this thread
    TTT's are a different animal. First, as everyone is on a TT bike, everyone is more focused on riding smoothly. Second, you typically practice as a team and are more diligent about communication (e.g., about which direction you are pulling off, whether you are going to echelon/cross-wheels to draft, etc.) Third, most TTT's are on smooth courses with minimal turns and need to alter your speed quickly. I do TTT's but would never ride my TT bike in the aero bars in a group ride paceline.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by srosenfeld
    TTT's are a different animal. First, as everyone is on a TT bike, everyone is more focused on riding smoothly. Second, you typically practice as a team and are more diligent about communication (e.g., about which direction you are pulling off, whether you are going to echelon/cross-wheels to draft, etc.) Third, most TTT's are on smooth courses with minimal turns and need to alter your speed quickly. I do TTT's but would never ride my TT bike in the aero bars in a group ride paceline.
    I will say they are different...but only to the effect that you are riding with other experienced riders instead of more club oriented riders that may not have great pack riding skills.

    As for TTT's being on courses with minimal turns without the need to alter speed quickly, that's only kind of true. Our TTT championship course is much more technical than our IT championship course. It has five 90 degree turns, several S-Turns per lap (3.8 laps in the race) and has a fair amount of slowing and acclerating on it. This year to add to the difficulty we had storms rolling through during the race and were pelted with heavy rain, wind and hail at several points during the race.

    Nothing like racing on your TT bike in the aero bars at 24-25mph with a 20mph crosswind, heavy rain and being pelted by pea sized hail

    As for riding a TT bike on a group ride...see the other thread for my comments on that. I've got no problem with it whether it be myself or others...as long as they have descent bike handling skills and pay attention.
    Last edited by Wookiebiker; 09-30-2010 at 10:59 AM.
    Bikes:
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by rx-79g
    Wookie, do you paceline without access to brakes like this?
    Yes I do...Both in the TTT's and during practice for TTT's...or when our team is working on ITT work and many of us bring our TT bikes to the group ride and hammer things out.

    The distance between myself and the rider in front of me when doing this is usually 6" to 1" from their rear wheel, just as one would do on a regular road bike.

    Paying attention, knowing how to moderate your speed without using your brakes and not being stupid are all keys to riding this way safely...and are all skills people should learn regardless of what type of bike they are riding.
    Bikes:
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  23. #23
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    I don't normally use brakes in a tight paceline, etheir, but I have had to on occasions when something unexpected happened to the rider in front of me and there was nowhere else to go. It sounds like a fine method when nothing unexpected can happen.

  24. #24
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  25. #25
    Baltic Scum
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    The real lesson: Don't pass the the Campy-guy, Moron!
    Was juckt es die stolze Eiche, wenn sich ein Schwein an ihr kratzt?

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