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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    almost all the handelbars out here have no real drop bend.

    I haven't been here in ages. back like 20 years ago I haunted the place. anyway looking for the most important thing I could say, something garnered over the years, and it's that 95percent of the handlebars out there suck. they're flexible and even more frustrating is maybe in an attempt to save weight or something they cut off what I'd say should be another 3 inches off the drops and then they angle them such that there's no way to have a level top of the bar and drop. you have to chose one or the other.

    deda magic and newton are awesome
    and Pro does some decent stiff stuff with a great bend too. stop...think about it...mull it over....there's a lot to be gained from a decent bar

  2. #2
    Forever a Student
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    I use the Zipp SL 70 Aero bar.

    Tops are level.

    Drop bottoms are level.

    Nice round deep bend with a tiny ergo touch.

    Very stiff and sturdy.




    Handlebars are a FIT item. You use what FITS you best.

    What fits you doesn't fit everyone else.

    Focus on yourself.
    use a torque wrench

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I don't like about 90% of them either. But no one if making me use them so I don't care.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hummina shadeeba View Post
    ...95percent of the handlebars out there suck
    Fortunately, you don't need 95% of the available bars to ride... really, it's somewhere around .05% of the available bars.

    I can't imagine a more comfortable bar than my Syncros RR.1. Seems pretty stiff too.


  5. #5
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    I guess that for just about anybody, 95% of the handlebars out there are not for them. I like the same things as you do, only with less of a drop. I have "stoker" bars on one bike (with reverse bar-end levers), and I find that few people even like this type of bar. OTOH, people used to sing praises of "mustache' bars, but I never could stand the damned things..
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I've grown to really like handlebars with the Maes bend. They have a long flat ramps and the drops are as long as, and parallel to the ramps. Plenty of room for lots of hand positions.

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    Too old to ride plastic

  7. #7
    Bianchi-Campagnolo
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    And I like the FSA compact. The other one I could live with is the Deda RHM.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    like the FSA compact too. Can't stand when I ride my near 30 year old bike with traditional Cinelli deep drop, curved and horiz drops.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I've grown to really like handlebars with the Maes bend. They have a long flat ramps and the drops are as long as, and parallel to the ramps. Plenty of room for lots of hand positions.

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    That is a crazy deep bar. I'd think you'd have to use a 2cm shorter stem than a more typical bar.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    That is a crazy deep bar. I'd think you'd have to use a 2cm shorter stem than a more typical bar.
    "Back in the day", those were "typical".

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    "Back in the day", those were "typical".
    I think this sort of bend is much more typical than a bar were the drops end directly under the tops.

    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    I think this sort of bend is much more typical than a bar were the drops end directly under the tops.

    There ya go. Deepest drop bars I've ever seen. Cinelli Campione Del Monde, right? Know them well.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:31 AM.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    like the FSA compact too. Can't stand when I ride my near 30 year old bike with traditional Cinelli deep drop, curved and horiz drops.
    Why not? There are lots of hand positions and rider can get lower in the drops.

    They did have a tendency to bend in crashes, though. And the prices are going up!

  14. #14
    a real member's member
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    i mount cinelli 64-38 bars on my keepers.

    the 66s are too deep/low.

    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    I think this sort of bend is much more typical than a bar were the drops end directly under the tops.

    Actually the bars with the Maes bend may predate these bars.

    https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...andlebars.html

    from the link.

    Those were names of famous Belgian Pro racers from the 1930s and 1940s. I believe Marcel Kint, Rik van Steenbergen and Alberic "Brick" Schotte all held World Champion titles between the late 1930s and 1950 [Schotte in both 1948 & 50]. And, Sylvere Maes was the winner of the Tour de France in 1936 and 1939, [Schotte came in 2nd in 1948].

    That handlebar was made by the Belgian company "TITAN", perhaps some time between the 1950s and early 70s. But, they were manufacturing bars and stems since the late 1930s. The heavy collar surrounding the stem clamp area was a fairly uncommon feature back then. It was not decorative, it was designed to ensure a strong and stiff alloy bar - very much a professional quality bar, and famous for being among the first early Dural alloy handlebars with no flex.

    They were made in 25 mm diameter but also in a much larger diameter as well. If you measure the diameter near the clamp area I would not be surprised to find it is uncommonly large, around 27 mm. diameter. At that time a Cinelli bar measured 26.4 mm at the center, a standard British or US clamp was 25.4 mm (1 inch) and French bars had a clamp diameter of only 25.0 mm. So, this was a very serious racing component. It also required a TITAN stem - since they were the only company making one with a 27.0 mm. clamp diameter.

    By the 1960s the Titan alloy bars were made with an unusual anodizing process which actually gave them a PINK color. This really did not strengthen them any further, it was really just to prevent corrosion - and to keep the hands and gloves from turning black (as they would from contact with any non-anodized aluminum).

    The bend of many road racing handlebars were frequently copied from this original shape and would soon be referred to with the generic term "Maes bend" - after Sylvere Maes who may have helped to promote this particular curve.
    Too old to ride plastic

  16. #16
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    Yeah man. I used those Giro d'Italias in the past. Went wider to 42 cm on the 66s, and got 'em on both keepers. I ride with good reach and like the roomy range of angles available.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 2 Weeks Ago at 01:53 AM.

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