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  1. #1
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    Anyone still ride in the cold...I'm looking for gloves

    I hope I'm not the only one, but I still ride in the cold. I have Pearl Izumi Elite Softshell gloves, which keep my somewhat warm, but when it gets cold (mid 30F in Illinois), the fingers get cold. I recently got PI Pro Barrier lobster gloves, which have been keeping my fingers warm when I use my mtb, but forget using them on my road bike. Braking is too difficult, as well as shifting. I know switching over to Di2 Dura Ace electronic shifting might help, but I don't have th $$$ for the upgrade. I figure buying gloves would be cheaper.
    - Ed

    2012 Trek Madone 6.7 SSL
    2013 Specialized Tricross Comp disc
    2011 Trek Top Fuel 9.9 SSL
    2012 Salsa Mukluk 2

  2. #2
    Jack of no trades
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    I have yet to find a glove that can keep my fingers warm in cold temps. Right now I use the Pearl Izumi Cyclone Gloves. I wear a thin glove beneath them, and so far they've been alright -- but it hasn't gotten super cold yet.

    The key, I think, is windproof. If you can block the wind, then your body has a better shot at keeping the digits warm.

    The only thing that'll ever keep your hands warm in the cold (effectively) are mittens. And even then you sometimes need warmers.

  3. #3
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    I got the Craft Siberian last year. I had a few rides in the low 20 and was able to wear them alone. I get cold hands easily and these were great. After 10 minutes or so I'd have to curl my hands to make mittens for a few minutes but once I warmed up they were fine. We'd be out for several hours. I've tried to cheap out in the past. For $50 bucks I thought it was money well spent.

  4. #4
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    Commuting year round in NYC means switching gloves all winter

    Regular fingerless gloves are good down to 35 degrees.

    Specialized Deflects are good down to 15-20 degrees depending on the wind or rain.

    PI Amfibs for anything colder than 15 degrees. Have worn them riding in -5 degrees.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gus68 View Post
    I got the Craft Siberian last year.
    Wow, someone wrote a long review on those. Long Term Review: CRAFT Siberian Gloves | TATI

  6. #6
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    you guys should stop shopping in the bike section and buy a cheap warm pair of gloves from a ski shop.

    done and done. your fingers will stay warm and who cares about 'thin' or 'lightweight' when you're out slogging miles in the winter anyway?

    i use a pair of ski gloves i bought in 1987 when riding in cold weather and have NEVER had a problem with cold fingers. they work fantastic.
    1999 Gary Fisher Procaliber Red/Yellow SRAM X9
    2001 LOOK KG281 Blue/Black 10sp Ultegra
    2002 Specialized Allez Red 9sp Ultegra
    Quintana Roooooo! TT bike (dura ace friction)
    2008 LOOK 586 Mondrian 10sp Ultegra

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyvram View Post
    you guys should stop shopping in the bike section and buy a cheap warm pair of gloves from a ski shop.

    done and done. your fingers will stay warm and who cares about 'thin' or 'lightweight' when you're out slogging miles in the winter anyway?

    i use a pair of ski gloves i bought in 1987 when riding in cold weather and have NEVER had a problem with cold fingers. they work fantastic.
    I was just going to say the same thing. This is one area where buying cycling-specific stuff gains you nothing in function and costs you more. I have some snowboarding gloves, with rubberized palms for grip and removable fleece liners for temperature versatility. I think they cost about $25

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ecub View Post
    I hope I'm not the only one, but I still ride in the cold. ...

    I know switching over to Di2 Dura Ace electronic shifting might help, but I don't have th $$$ for the upgrade. I figure buying gloves would be cheaper.
    There may be many reasons to switch to electronics shifting, but "I needed warmer gloves" is not one of them!

  9. #9
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    I'm still riding up here in Toronto....the Sugoi Firewall Z's have been great for me...I like the "penguin" style as it keeps the fingers warmer....
    Gloves | Accessories | Bike | SUGOI Performance Apparel

  10. #10
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    I use lobster mitts when it gets cold, and don't mind the difference in shifting/braking between them and gloves with fingers. ymmv
    We'll be back soon, there will be more of us, and next time we won't be dropping leaflets.

    “The problem with quotes on the internet is that it’s hard to verify their authenticity” – Abraham Lincoln

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyvram View Post
    you guys should stop shopping in the bike section and buy a cheap warm pair of gloves from a ski shop.

    done and done. your fingers will stay warm and who cares about 'thin' or 'lightweight' when you're out slogging miles in the winter anyway?

    i use a pair of ski gloves i bought in 1987 when riding in cold weather and have NEVER had a problem with cold fingers. they work fantastic.
    I have ski gloves, but they still don't seem to keep my fingers warm enough. Plus they are rather thick. I have Shimano breaks with the integrating shifting, so may contribute to my shifting difficulty, especially with thick gloves.

    Quote Originally Posted by 55x11 View Post
    There may be many reasons to switch to electronics shifting, but "I needed warmer gloves" is not one of them!
    - Ed

    2012 Trek Madone 6.7 SSL
    2013 Specialized Tricross Comp disc
    2011 Trek Top Fuel 9.9 SSL
    2012 Salsa Mukluk 2

  12. #12
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    Bar mitts, barmitts.com/

  13. #13
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    I also use the Craft Siberians. Best winter gloves I have used. Definitely a step up from the Pearl Izumi pro lobster gloves.

  14. #14
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    I use KB Nordic Wind Stopping Gloves and they work great for me. I was out a few days ago at 26* and 12 mph wind and they worked great. If it gets even colder you add these as well. I use a lot of KB stuff and it is SUPER INEXPENSIVE and works FANTASTIC. I highly recommend.
    A while back I decided to ride a bike as often as possible. These are my observations from the saddle, one pedal stroke at a time, on my way to being a better cyclist.

  15. #15
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    I've been using 2 pairs of cheap Target knit gloves ($2 for 2 pair) under my regular fingerless gloves. So far I've been able to ride in the low thirties with no issues. We did a 40 mile ride that started with temps in the low thirties. As it got warmer and we got warmer we shed the first pair of gloves. A little later we shed the last layer of gloves and only needed our regular gloves. The knit gloves are cheap and we don't worry if we misplace one or both. My hands get cold very easily so I was very surprised with this actually worked.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ecub View Post
    I have ski gloves, but they still don't seem to keep my fingers warm enough. Plus they are rather thick. I have Shimano breaks with the integrating shifting, so may contribute to my shifting difficulty, especially with thick gloves.
    It's hard to get warm without thick. You might look for gloves that have:
    1) a more efficient insulation (relatively thinner) like Thinsulate; and
    2) a layer of barrier fabric like Goretex, which blocks wind better.

    I recently got a pair of these waterproof ski gloves for 10 bucks from Sierra Trading Post. Haven't been able to test them in very cold yet (grateful for that), but they feel like they'd easily be good to 20 or so. YMMV
    Manzella Ski Gloves - Waterproof (For Men) - Save 50%

    Another trick is to add a second, inner layer. A thin silk or wool liner glove will extend the effectiveness of any glove. The outer glove has to have a little room, so you don't end up with the combination too tight and restrict circulation (which will make you even colder).

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by onespeed View Post
    Have worn them riding in -5 degrees.
    Holy Crap that's dedication.

  18. #18
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    Ride fixed in the winter. No worries about shifting gears and you'll lean how to spin better.
    If you focus on the past, you will never see the future.

    Every day I wake up is a good day!

    "I don't need another bike"
    - Anonymous

  19. #19
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    I use these Seirus All Weather gloves when it's cold and/or wet. I also use them when I am kayaking. If it is really cold and/or snowing, I just wear one of my many pairs of GoreTex snowboard gloves.

  20. #20
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    My hands are prone to get cold. PI Lobsters with a glove liner do the trick for me when it gets 35 and below. I have gloves for about every temp range in a 10 degree spread.

    I always use glove liners so I can regulate the warmth by removing the gloves and only wear the liners. Layers always work best.
    J

  21. #21
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    For low 30's my Biemme windstopper gloves work fine. Below that I double them up with some ancient PI pittard leather gloves- kinda bulky, but they're warm

  22. #22
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    Thanks for all of this info

    I'm looking for gloves as well. Live in Orlando so only need ones good to 30F or so. Now I know where to look.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake21 View Post
    My hands are prone to get cold. PI Lobsters with a glove liner do the trick for me when it gets 35 and below. I have gloves for about every temp range in a 10 degree spread.

    I always use glove liners so I can regulate the warmth by removing the gloves and only wear the liners. Layers always work best.
    J
    What glove liners are you using? I've read of people using those disposable rubber surgical gloves, but the downside is they make your hands sweat.
    - Ed

    2012 Trek Madone 6.7 SSL
    2013 Specialized Tricross Comp disc
    2011 Trek Top Fuel 9.9 SSL
    2012 Salsa Mukluk 2

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronbo613 View Post
    I use these Seirus All Weather gloves when it's cold and/or wet. I also use them when I am kayaking. If it is really cold and/or snowing, I just wear one of my many pairs of GoreTex snowboard gloves.
    Are those really waterproof? The one condition I don't have really good gloves for is cool wet (rain at 40-50). Warmer, I can wear regular cycling gloves (light ones that dry fast); colder, I can wear waterproof winter gloves, but those are too warm for the moderate conditions. It would be useful to have something that would stay dry inside in those cool wet conditions. But "water resistant" isn't good enough if I''m commuting in driving rain.

  25. #25
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    I use a "system" that pearl izumi used to sell quite a few years ago. Two gloves. Interior one, synthetic wool base, External shell, windproof, with string cords and grips handle bar. It is not that thick and it is flexible. I was looking for a pic, but could not find one. Probably because it's an old product.

    Other manufacturers offer similar options, however I find them pretty pricey.

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