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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    as another data point, currently have 4100 miles on the rear, and 9800 on the front.

    neither tire is close to being retired based on the wear indicators.
    Just saw this, and it's unreal. I get 3K miles on the front and 1.5K miles on the rear, tops. I can't imagine going that far on those skins. Damn.

  2. #27
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    I've never purposely tracked tire life to mileage.
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I've never purposely tracked tire life to mileage.
    just used the units of work in joules instead did ya?

    just flatted on my new Speclzd tire that replaced the recently shredded s4ks2whateveritscalled tire. I'm going back to the Conti 4000ks2000hondawhateveritscalled come what may, cause they at least go more than 4 months between flats for me, let alone 2 weeks
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  4. #29
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    Just for fun as it pretty meaningless regarding the tire in general.

    Took off a worn 4000SII that only had one recent flat in approx. 3,000 miles. Put on a new 4000S11 and had 2 flats on today's ride. Proving the puncture protection on this tire has been removed on the newer batch.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    How much weight loss does a worn/rear show?

    I don't weigh tires but when you use something with a file pattern like the old Vit Corsa or Veloflex I think the visual evidence of it disappearing is pretty strong. And I've never had one not go bald well before thousands of miles.
    It does depend on the tire, as some have more tread rubber than others, but having weighed a lot of tires over the years, I find that they have lost about 15% of their weight when casing threads start to show through the tread. If the tire has never experienced a skid of any kind, that number can be a bit higher.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    At the risk of being called names, what about a lot of downhill turns?
    The amount of energy dissipated through the tire from powering riding is hugely higher than the amount from braking, even braking on seriously twisty downhills. This is a simple thought experiment - let's say ALL of your riding was just climb a hill, and brake heavily on the way down. Even then, far more energy was spent going up the hill than was scrubbed off going down because of the aerodynamic load when descending vs. climbing. And of course everyone knows that "example" of "only climbing and hard braking downhills" doesn't exist in the real world.

    Rather than argue from ignorance, just weigh your tires and record your mileage. I had no idea how this all worked until I took measurements. My research is published here: Tires

  7. #32
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    Add me to the list of folks who has had bad luck with the GP4000sII purchased in the last year.

    Over the previous 4 years I had 3 flats in about 17,000 miles of riding.

    In December I put on GP4000sIIs and I got 5 flats in about 800 miles.

    That could just be bad luck, but the tires looked like swiss cheese, and I never had any problems with Michelin Pro 4s or Schwalbe Ones slicing up like that...

  8. #33
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    I was a Conti afficianado for years. I rode on 3000 and 4000 series for day to day rides and supersonics for races.

    I always carried 2 spare tubes and a patch kit because I needed all on many occasions.

    Then, I switched to vred fortezza superlites for training and racing.

    I still ride vreds... Tricomp Fondo now.

    Here's the thing: after I switched to vreds, which corner much better than all the top of the line Conti tires I had ridden for something like 10 - 15 years... I realized that I didn't need to carry 2 spare tubes. Frankly, the one spare tube I carry has probably dry rotted.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    The amount of energy dissipated through the tire from powering riding is hugely higher than the amount from braking, even braking on seriously twisty downhills. This is a simple thought experiment - let's say ALL of your riding was just climb a hill, and brake heavily on the way down. Even then, far more energy was spent going up the hill than was scrubbed off going down because of the aerodynamic load when descending vs. climbing. And of course everyone knows that "example" of "only climbing and hard braking downhills" doesn't exist in the real world.

    Rather than argue from ignorance, just weigh your tires and record your mileage. I had no idea how this all worked until I took measurements. My research is published here: Tires
    So a question for ya, why are all these guys putting the new tire on the front and moving existing front to the rear if the front is not wearing?

    A civil answer will suffice.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    So a question for ya, why are all these guys putting the new tire on the front and moving existing front to the rear if the front is not wearing?

    A civil answer will suffice.
    While the rear tire wears much faster than the front, you still always want your newest tire on the front because a flat or blowout on the front is always more dangerous than one on the rear.

    By moving the old front tire to the rear when the rear one wears out, you get more life out of that tire overall and still ensure that you have your best tire on the front.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    So a question for ya, why are all these guys putting the new tire on the front and moving existing front to the rear if the front is not wearing?

    A civil answer will suffice.
    Please show where someone ever said a front tire does not wear.

  12. #37
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    I ride Michelin Pro 4 Endurance. I believe the price is lower and the performance at least as good. Only downside is they are not readily available in stores. I buy on-line. I get beteen 2,000-2,500 miles per tire on them.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Please show where someone ever said a front tire does not wear.
    lemme go get some coffee first, brb.
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    I ride Michelin Pro 4 Endurance. I believe the price is lower and the performance at least as good. Only downside is they are not readily available in stores. I buy on-line. I get beteen 2,000-2,500 miles per tire on them.
    After one too many flats and a nasty crash, I also have switched to the Michelin Pro4 endurance from the gp4000. I haven't had any issues with the Pro4 Endurance. One thing though, the Pro4 endurance has a lower rolling resistance than the new Michelin Power Competition Endurance tire. I have been riding the same set of Pro4 for almost a year. The rear has a flat spot so I'll be replacing it. I don't know why anyone would test their luck by trying to get excessive mileage from a bike tire. I think of it as a 40.00 insurance policy against hitting the pavement.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by dougfresh View Post
    After one too many flats and a nasty crash, I also have switched to the Michelin Pro4 endurance from the gp4000. I haven't had any issues with the Pro4 Endurance. One thing though, the Pro4 endurance has a lower rolling resistance than the new Michelin Power Competition Endurance tire. I have been riding the same set of Pro4 for almost a year. The rear has a flat spot so I'll be replacing it. I don't know why anyone would test their luck by trying to get excessive mileage from a bike tire. I think of it as a 40.00 insurance policy against hitting the pavement.
    What we have here is failure to communicate.

    Some people you just can’t reach, , so you get what we have here today, and he likes it. Well, he gets it. I don’t like it anymore than you men.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    What we have here is failure to communicate.

    Some people you just can’t reach, , so you get what we have here today, and he likes it. Well, he gets it. I don’t like it anymore than you men.
    All the low rolling resistance in the world doesn't help when you're beside the road fixing a flat long after all your riding buddies have disappeared over the horizon. Been there, done that, no more.

    Vreds FTW.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by thisisthebeave View Post
    Looking back at my maintenance log, I get about 1,500 miles out of a rear but my last 3 have lasted 300-500 before getting a slice. This could just be really unlucky but someone I know suggested that it could have been a bad batch of tires. Anyone else experience this lately (or in the last year or two since I think I bought these a year or two ago)?
    I tried this tire a couple of years ago and lost a couple due to cuts. They rode great but the punctures were too frequent and resulted in a trashed tire. Switched to Gatorskins on that bike and Michelin Pro4 on the other and have had much better success. I still have a GP4000s II or two in my spares box and I'm buying new tires rather than use them again.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Beave,
    Vittoria Corsas aren't known for sidewalls slicing.

    Have a look:
    https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...-graphene-2016

    Notice the difference in tire weight and sidewall thickness and rolling resistance is about a push at higher psi.
    IME Vittoria Corsa G+ are super fast, have excellent cornering, ride super smooth, and are the LEAST durable tire I've ever ridden. I had more flats/cuts/what-have-you in 3 months than I normally have with GP4000s in 3 years.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by fronesis View Post
    While the rear tire wears much faster than the front, you still always want your newest tire on the front because a flat or blowout on the front is always more dangerous than one on the rear.

    By moving the old front tire to the rear when the rear one wears out, you get more life out of that tire overall and still ensure that you have your best tire on the front.
    I forget who here said this, but it bears repeating:

    Rotating bike tires is like wiping after taking a dump. Always front to back and what comes off the back gets thrown away.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Rotating bike tires is like not wiping after taking a dump.
    Sorry but had to FIFY. Rotating bike tires is a waste of time. Replace tires when worn.
    Bicycle aren't automobiles where there is concern over uniformity of thread wear due to tire width.

  21. #46
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    Bad batch of Conti GP4000SII's?

    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Sorry but had to FIFY. Rotating bike tires is a waste of time. Replace tires when worn.
    Bicycle aren't automobiles where there is concern over uniformity of thread wear due to tire width.
    Front tires last so they die from rot and cuts before you can wear out the tread. It's best to have the new tire on the front because a flat or blowout can cause a crash whereas a rear flat can be ridden out under most circumstances. I always rotate the front to the back when the rear tire wears out and put the new tire on the front. It's more economical as well. I don't bother rotating to equalize wear though.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    Front tires last so they die from rot and cuts before you can wear out the tread. It's best to have the new tire on the front because a flat or blowout can cause a crash whereas a rear flat can be ridden out under most circumstances. I always rotate the front to the back when the rear tire wears out and put the new tire on the front. It's more economical as well. I don't bother rotating to equalize wear though.
    You pose the counterpoint. To me a waste of time and effort. I ride enough miles where I work through the front tire before any dry rot and I inspect for cuts during cleaning which I am pretty vigilant about. I do however like to maintain a pretty pristine front tire for the good reasons you state. I just find little benefit every time my rear tire wears down which is 3 x's to 1 front.

  23. #48
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    I love how this front to back old wives tale keeps getting repeated from message board to message board.

    And now the Village Idiot is comparing it to butt wiping.
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    I do however like to maintain a pretty pristine front tire for the good reasons you state.
    So you basically prove my point. The only way to keep your front tire "pristine" is to put your newest tire on the front. That involves moving your front to rear when your rear wears out.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    So you basically prove my point. The only way to keep your front tire "pristine" is to put your newest tire on the front. That involves moving your front to rear when your rear wears out.
    Or installing a brand new tire on the front, when needed.
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

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