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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimP View Post
    I don't understand the aversion to wearing a Camelback. For over 50% of the country a couple of water bottles may be sufficient but for the southwest, 2, 3, or 4 bottles may not do the job. As stated, last year we had over 100 days of over 100 degree temperatures in North Texas. Even starting a ride at 7 am, the temperature was over 100 degrees before we finished. Regular water bottles don't do the trick. Frozen water bottles don't last long enough. Frozen insulated water bottles don't thaw fast enough at first. I found filling 2 insulated 24 oz water bottles with ice and water was good for the first 30 miles. After 30 miles, a 70 oz camelback filled with ice and water would be good for 50-60 miles. Refill the bottles? Start your ride in Ft. Davis, TX at 5,000 feet for a ride around the 75 mile loop in the Texas Alps with passes over 6,200 feet in the summer with the temperatures in the mid 80s. The air in the high desert is dry. There are no gas stations, no place to refill your bottles. Even 2 bottles and a camelback are not enough. Call me a Fred but I prefer names to dehydration.
    Absolutely right

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by F45 View Post
    On one 80 mile ride that had no potable water sources along the way, I carried an MSR filter and refilled at cattle tanks.
    You are my hero!

  3. #28
    PhotonFreak
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    I'm in arizona, Most my 40 mile rides I strategically pass a water fountain where I refill my two 24oz bottles -- I often refill multiple times on the same spot if it's an "out and back" or loop-repeat type course.

    If going on a long stretch without a refill spot, I carry two more bottles behind the seat using bottle cages that mount to the seat rails. I haven't yet gone on a long enough ride w/o refill opportunities that 4 bottles isn't enough.
    Last edited by PhotonFreak; 04-11-2012 at 06:30 PM.

  4. #29
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    For my longest "training" ride of 64 miles or 100km I do this -

    Hydrate before I ride (a large waterbottle in the prior hour).
    Use 1 large bottle per hour while riding. (just under 4hrs total)
    Ride a "bowtie" shaped route (2 loops of 50km).
    Make the route crossover just on the edge of town, 5 minutes from my house.
    Have my wife meet me there at a pre-determined time.
    Exchange 2 empty bottles with two full ones.
    Ride the last 50km.
    Weigh myself when I get home and drink the amount of weight that I lost.
    .
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  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by alf1096 View Post
    How to you carry more water.
    Standard choice: either a backpack or a rack.

    If you decide to go the backpack route, then Camelback-style solution is a good option, but not the only one.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimP View Post
    I don't understand the aversion to wearing a Camelback.
    There's no aversion to wearing Cameback. You must have misinterpreted the behavior of a small but vocal group of poseurs with some sort of common "aversion". In reality it simply doesn't exist.

    With a road bike you are essentially limited to a choice of Camelback or a rack. Racks used to be popular a while ago, but since then they have fallen out of fashion (not even mentioning that many modern bikes are not immediately made to support a rack). Which is why these days everyone is using Camelbacks for hydration.

  7. #32
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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimP View Post
    I don't understand the aversion to wearing a Camelback. For over 50% of the country a couple of water bottles may be sufficient but for the southwest, 2, 3, or 4 bottles may not do the job. .
    That's just it... around here you are always within 10-15 minutes of a place with water. So seeing 2 bottles and a camelbak ... well it's a little unnecessary.

  9. #34
    It's Good For You!
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    Have you tried tanking up with some cheap canned beer before your ride?
    Ski Good or Eat Wood

  10. #35
    PhotonFreak
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    Quote Originally Posted by snosaw View Post
    Have you tried tanking up with some cheap canned beer before your ride?
    This is often my strategy for post-ride hydration

  11. #36
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    carry two 24 oz bottles ~ 30-40 miles. refill at gas station. $1.50 can usually top off both bottles (usually pick up a treat as well and nature break). no point carrying all those extra bottles...

  12. #37
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    myself as well

    Quote Originally Posted by RJP Diver View Post
    Though, for particularly warm rides I'll often freeze a bottle for the jersey pocket. I'll let it cool me while it thaws and then tap it last. Typically I'll freeze something in a Poland Spring or similar bottle so that I can dispose of it (properly) once it's done.
    freeze that bottle so it keeps the midsection cooler

    I've never needed 3 bottles for 40 miles unless it is hot with lots of climbing
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  13. #38
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    I use a Aero bottle plus a 24 ounce on the fram, and then a 20oz on the frame for a multi-hour fuel bottle. I actually am expecting a seat mounted double bottle holder in the mail tomorrow.

    If I skip the multi-hour fuel bottle, then the 3 bottles I already have will last me 3-4 hours.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by psycleridr View Post
    Not knowing your route can't you just stop somewhere to refill? Park, convenience store, etc? I only carry two regardless of distance and take some money and have no problem stopping for 5 min to refill with whatever I like
    I rode in the deserts and mountains of California for over 30 years, and there are places I went where there is no place to stop to refill, so I had to carry all my water with me. That's why I used a 70oz Camelback and three 24oz Polar Bottles. I don't really like carrying water on my back, but there were rides I went on where I had no choice. But carrying 70oz's of liquid vs carrying their larger 120oz packs is a lot easier on your back. Most people I knew that lived in Southern California desert and mountain areas used Camelbacks. But if your wanting to ride into remote areas like I did, and it's over 90 degrees outside, you figure out how to carry liquid or you don't ride into those areas and/or in that heat. When it was over 90 degrees I would go through about 24oz's of liquid in about 30 minutes, that's only about 3 hours of riding. There are some tricks to help with that kind heat while riding, but that can wait till it's brought up...but a hint is in the Polar bottle.

  15. #40
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    Trade the bike in for a camel?

  16. #41
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    There are a lot more places then just Arizona that gets hot. Try riding through Death Valley, Joshua tree park area, Palm Desert area, middle of California stretching from Bakersfield to Sacramento, all of those places will easily exceed 105 in the summer, New Mexico, Nevada, and Texas, could also. The second highest recorded temperature ever recorded was 134 degrees in 1913 in Death Valley. I don't recommend riding in 134 degree weather! Maybe this summer a lot of places will see over 100 degrees since our winter was so mild.

  17. #42
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    Why not just get bigger bottles? My frame size is 56 and I can fit two 33oz bottles in standard cages in the standard places. I have the Zefal Magnum, <$10ea.

    Again if frame size permits, you can mount a standard cage under the downtube using a pair of automotive hose clamps. Put some inner tube under the clips to avoid scratching your frame and the compression keeps it in place. Not the prettiest looking setup, but it's an option. You can spray paint the clips I guess and it isn't permanent - the clips are reusable.

  18. #43
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    I have one bottle that is a liter, and it can fit in either water bottle holder (so I could carry 2 liters if I wanted). The liter and a 24 oz are enough to get me through 50 miles at least.

    No aversion to Camelbacks per se, but it sure feels good to ride w/o something on my back if I can arrange it, which is why I prefer to use bottles. I've never ridden longer than 50 miles w/o coming across a store or other refilling source on the road bike (I have emptied a 100 oz CB many times on my mtb), so there simply is no need for me to have the water on my back.

    If I were doing such a long, isolated route, I'd strap on the CB for 2 reasons - to have all the water I needed, and to carry extra food, tools, etc, that I might want if I were not likely to be around other people for 5 to 6 hours (like I might be on a long mtb ride).
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  19. #44
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    I pay a car to follow me and when I need water they just pull up and give me some

  20. #45
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    It may not be a "road appropriate" but, I use a Camelbak with a 100 ounce bladder along with two 24 ounce bottles. I have Cystic Fibrosis and I have special hydration requirements.

  21. #46
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    My personal hydration rate is about a bottle an hour: small bottles in hot, humid weather, large in the drier areas.

    (I don't ride in the desert SW, so YMMV.)

    I seldom find a way to ride hours from any houses or farms; and I've never managed to not find someone out mowing the grass willing to part with 24 oz's of hose water.

    (I usually set routes for a gas station stop, but sometimes that doesn't work out.)

    Heck, as often as not, I'm offered tea, soda, lemonade wherever I stop to ask.

    If I do need extra water - say, if I'm trying to set a PR and don't want to stop - I'm usually a 3rd bottle in the jersey. Have a Camelbak if I need it, but don't prefer it. I've also used a toe clip strap to tie a bottle under the saddle. Obviously can't use it there, but it's only a few seconds to swap it with an empty in the cages.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve246 View Post
    Why not just get bigger bottles? My frame size is 56 and I can fit two 33oz bottles in standard cages in the standard places. I have the Zefal Magnum, <$10ea.

    Again if frame size permits, you can mount a standard cage under the downtube using a pair of automotive hose clamps. Put some inner tube under the clips to avoid scratching your frame and the compression keeps it in place. Not the prettiest looking setup, but it's an option. You can spray paint the clips I guess and it isn't permanent - the clips are reusable.
    Steve, those 33oz bottles work great as long as it's not hot outside and your going to be riding for more then an hour and a half. What the heck am I talking about you scream. Your body needs cold liquids to bring down your core temperature so that you don't overheat. None of those 33oz bottles come insulated. With a insulated bottle like the Polar, the best on the market for insulation; you can fill one bottle with ice cubes and pour in your favorite prechilled drink, and that drink will remain cold for up to 2 hours in 90 plus degree heat. The other bottle you fill with about 1/2 ice and pour in a chilled drink and that one will be cold for up to an hour in 90+ degree heat. What I did with 3 bottles was to put my chilled drink in one bottle and put in the freezer overnight, that one would last up to 3 hours, then do the other stuff too the bottles as mentioned and I would have a cold to cool drink for the entire 3 hour ride. You can't do that with a uninsulated bottle...I know, I tried. A frozen hard unsulated bottle will last about 1 1/2 hours in 90+ degree heat and will be hot to drink within two hours even with crumpled shiny side out tin foil wrapped around the bottle to reflect the suns rays...I know, I tried that too.

    Same thing with a Camelback; I use to fill the bladder full with ice and then pour in a chilled drink. But with a Cameback or some such product the tube will keep liquid in it and will bake in the sun so your first mouthful is very hot, so you need to remember to blow the liquid back into the bladder when your done taking a drink. A Camelback with ice would last about 2 hours, so I always drank off it first, plus by drinking it first it got the water weight off my back sooner. But this did mean that I had to freeze my bottles rock hard to make them last, and then cover them with crumpled tin foil because that trick does work to a small degree.

    Of course when it gets that hot you can always stay home...but what kind of man would you be if you did that?

  23. #48
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    You have some very simple options:
    1) Stop at convenience stores along the ride and buy bottled water.
    2) Use a Camelbak

    It gets very hot and humid in the Southeast as well, altho not as extreme as Texas. It is hard to ride more than 10 miles around here without passing some kind of store that sells bottled water. If that isn't the case where you live, a Camelback and two 24-oz bottles should be enough water for just about any ride except Death Valley or other deserts with no towns.

  24. #49
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    Anyone already knows the fact that every rider has their own level of hydration needs in order to keep their performance they're expecting on themselves. Road cyclists should refrain from stereotyping the use of Camelbaks as strictly for off-road use only, as this may be very helpful to other roadies who have hydration needs greater than what 2-24oz. bottles can provide, are on a ride that is greater than 40 miles, and replenishing their water bottles are not possible along their route.

    I still remember my 45-mile ride last March on a 60F sunny weather. I thought my two 24oz. bottles are enough for my needs and was planning to stop by at any convenience store that will be along the way for refills. Turned out my ride mates have a DNA of a camel so they don't mind if there's a refill station or not. On the last 8 miles, that's when I experienced the feeling of what some call 'running on fumes'. It's a deflating feeling, my legs are getting tired with every stroke, and I can really see my speed gradually decreasing without my permission.

    Lesson learned. Next time I have a better idea of how to adjust my hydration needs.

  25. #50
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    Living up in the northeast where even in "rural" areas you are still not more than 2 water bottles away from a potable hydration source (i.e. gas station) wearing a camelback is just not necessary. I use one off-road because on longer rides in the woods simply because it's easier to keep clean than a water bottle.

    However, if you live in Las Vegas, Texas, OK or some other part of the country/world where it is hotter than living hell then you can bet your butt I would be riding my road bike with a camelback on.

    Consider this. Water is not only a source of hydration, but a source of cooling. In very high temps like what you find in Texas besides dehydration the body can very easily not be able to cool fast enough. Having a fresh cool water supply can help with both and prevent heat exhaustion and heat stroke as well as dehydration. You do not have to be dehydrated to have a full on heat stroke. I have seen this many times in the military down in central america.

    Camelbacks will keep more water, cooler for longer. Period. So if you need one, use one.

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