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  1. #1
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    biggest drains on the gps battery

    any research or data on how much various features impact battery charge time?


    -keeping GLONASS on?
    -keeping BLUETOOTH on?
    -backlight on?

    Wondering what I can turn off to get the biggest bang for the buck without compromising too much on functionality

  2. #2
    tlg
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    Those are the big 3 that you can pretty much do without. Next would be ANT if you can do without it.
    Also Recording Interval
    Controls how the device records activity data. The Smart option records key points where you change direction, speed, or heart rate. The 1 Sec option records points every second. It creates a very detailed record of your activity and increases the size of the stored activity file

    Other than that not much you can do.
    I don't know of any research comparisons.

    Another option is to carry a small battery charger. About the size of a Co2.
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  3. #3
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    I don't want to change recording intervals. Guess I'll do an experiment with bluetooth on and off,but it will hardly be scientific since whether the phone needs to communicate with the garmin will be a factor i can't really control

  4. #4
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    BT can be a killer.

    I keep it on for 3 things on my Garmin 1000 with a Di2 system.

    1) Live Track, lets my wife know if I'm at a hospital.
    2) End of remote ride allows ease of ride data save to the cloud
    3) Has gear info. and Di2 battery status.

    I could turn off all 3, but one of the reasons I have gadgets is to use them.

    I keep the recording interval set to get the most accurate ride data possible, but I turn off GLONASS as it's not necessary.

  5. #5
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    BT can be a killer.

    I keep it on for 3 things on my Garmin 1000 with a Di2 system.

    1) Live Track, lets my wife know if I'm at a hospital.
    Well technically it lets your wife know where your garmin is. If it's on your bike in a ditch, and you're at the hospital, she won't know where you are.

    2) End of remote ride allows ease of ride data save to the cloud
    You can always just turn on BT after your ride and then it'll upload to Garmin Connect.

    3) Has gear info. and Di2 battery status.
    That's displayed on your Garmin through ANT. BT not required.

    I keep the recording interval set to get the most accurate ride data possible
    How accurate do you need? I've never found an appreciable difference between the two on the road. On a MTB, yes because of tight twisty trails but not on a road bike.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Well technically it lets your wife know where your garmin is. If it's on your bike in a ditch, and you're at the hospital, she won't know where you are.

    You can always just turn on BT after your ride and then it'll upload to Garmin Connect.

    That's displayed on your Garmin through ANT. BT not required.

    How accurate do you need? I've never found an appreciable difference between the two on the road. On a MTB, yes because of tight twisty trails but not on a road bike.
    Good points all, TLG

    Food for thought.

    I do use a speed sensor on my "go fast" bike and mt. bike, so recording interval isn't really needed on those and I can live with good enough on the commuters, distance never varies on those rides anyway.

    "Where my Garmin is", well I'm not going to repeat that quote to my wife, needless to say.

    So since BT is on for the Live Track, it'll stay on for ride data. It's not a huge killer, I get 10 - 12 hrs. of usage on the 1000 typically.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    Good points all, TLG

    Food for thought.

    I do use a speed sensor on my "go fast" bike and mt. bike, so recording interval isn't really needed on those and I can live with good enough on the commuters, distance never varies on those rides anyway.

    "Where my Garmin is", well I'm not going to repeat that quote to my wife, needless to say.

    So since BT is on for the Live Track, it'll stay on for ride data. It's not a huge killer, I get 10 - 12 hrs. of usage on the 1000 typically.

    Another hack I used on my Edge1K was turning off the digitizer. Only way I could ride 100mi with E1K was with most of the features I paid for (BT AKA phone pairing/touch) turned off. And even then the battery would be flat.

    At least with the 1K, you can use an ordinary USB battery charger...not be locked in to the $150 proprietary monstrosity Garmin created for the 1030.
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    Blue tooth BLE (low energy) is not much of a drain. Backlighting is the biggest killer of battery by far. GLONASS on my other Garmins was a noticable drain on the battery, not on the 1030.

    Nobody is locked in the Garmin battery pack for the 1030, you can certainly use any micro USB remote battery pack with a 90degree cord head. The Garmin add on battery pack for the 1030, it's very nice although it is spendy, but most are not going to need it ever. The 1030 will last much longer than most anyone will ever want it to without an external battery . The Garmin packs aren't $150, I paid $110 on sale, normally $114. What is nice about it is the clean design and water 'proofness' vs using a cord to an external battery. I've used both approaches at events and much prefer the Garmin solution.
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  9. #9
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    Adding to what Srode said. I rode 120mi over 7+ hours with turn-by-turn on an Edge 1030. My battery life was at 60% at the end of the ride.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    Blue tooth BLE (low energy) is not much of a drain. Backlighting is the biggest killer of battery by far. GLONASS on my other Garmins was a noticable drain on the battery, not on the 1030.

    Nobody is locked in the Garmin battery pack for the 1030, you can certainly use any micro USB remote battery pack with a 90degree cord head.
    There's actually a 1/2" of space between the computer and the stem/handlebar for a 90*USB cable? Color me surprised.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    There's actually a 1/2" of space between the computer and the stem/handlebar for a 90*USB cable? Color me surprised.
    A very specific right angle micro USB.

  12. #12
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    I've always wondered why there isn't a solar cell charger on the market....something else to bolt to the handlebars.
    To those in uniform, both present and past, who have protected my freedoms, I thank you. I've had a good life so far.

  13. #13
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    I have a right angle usb for my garmin 820. Put a usb batery in a top tube bento bag. Works great.

    Just buy a both right and left handed usb (<$10 from amazon). The arms on the new and old garmin mounts are on opposite sides.

    When trying to max battery life, i min screen back light time out and brightness, disable bluetooth, disable non-attached sensors, and disable glonass.

    Fwiw, battery life really starts droping off after the first year.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug B View Post
    I've always wondered why there isn't a solar cell charger on the market....something else to bolt to the handlebars.
    Loaded tourers/bikepackers use them...they have to be very large to be effective. Youíre better off with dynamo hub attached to a USB power bank if you need to go off grid so long.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    I have a right angle usb for my garmin 820. Put a usb batery in a top tube bento bag. Works great.

    Just buy a both right and left handed usb (<$10 from amazon). The arms on the new and old garmin mounts are on opposite sides.



    When trying to max battery life, i min screen back light time out and brightness, disable bluetooth, disable non-attached sensors, and disable glonass.

    Fwiw, battery life really starts droping off after the first year.
    Thanks for the info! I would want to try that for my 820. I hope it also works good.

  16. #16
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    If you want to maximize battery life on any lithium-ion battery, you should avoid charging your device to 100% unless you know you need the extra mAh. The goal would be to keep the battery as close to 50% charge as possible. If it dips to 30%, charge it up to about 70% and unplug. Or at the very least unplug the device once it hits 100% or close to it.

    That's a lot of extra thought processes so I don't do it personally. I do unplug any full charged devices when I remember, but that's about it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceugene View Post
    If you want to maximize battery life on any lithium-ion battery, you should avoid charging your device to 100% unless you know you need the extra mAh. The goal would be to keep the battery as close to 50% charge as possible. If it dips to 30%, charge it up to about 70% and unplug. Or at the very least unplug the device once it hits 100% or close to it.
    Not so according to this article - Exposure to heat and high charge voltage are what I have read is the largest contributors to Li battery life

    https://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to...ion-batteries/
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  18. #18
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    Did in excess of a 9 hour ride on Saturday. Battery was down to 65% apx. So far I like the 1030. Probably not worth the money but it does work a little nicer than my 810. Haven't tested out following a route yet.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneertough View Post
    Thanks for the info! I would want to try that for my 820. I hope it also works good.
    Curious as to battery life on the 820. I have used an 800 for the last few years and after a century I would still have 50% battery left (with navigation on). I bought an 820 yesterday. I am hoping it gets similar battery life but some posts here make we wonder. What are folks seeing?

  20. #20
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    When new, both my 810 and my 820 used less than 10% per hour.

    After a year and a few months, they use about 15% per hour. I would guess my 4 year old 810 would not last much over 60 miles (3-4 hours). My 15ish month old 820 lasts about 120 miles (6-7 hours). Ant+ and gps enabled.

    I ride 5 to 6 days per week. So, they both had some degree of charge cycle nearly every day.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    Not so according to this article - Exposure to heat and high charge voltage are what I have read is the largest contributors to Li battery life

    https://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to...ion-batteries/
    Yes and lifhium-ion batteries charge at higher current when they are at lower and higher levels of charge. If youíve ever perceived the last 20% of a recharge to be slower, thatís because it is...there is more resistance as the battery reaches capacity.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    When new, both my 810 and my 820 used less than 10% per hour.

    After a year and a few months, they use about 15% per hour. I would guess my 4 year old 810 would not last much over 60 miles (3-4 hours). My 15ish month old 820 lasts about 120 miles (6-7 hours). Ant+ and gps enabled.

    I ride 5 to 6 days per week. So, they both had some degree of charge cycle nearly every day.
    Is this with navigation on or off? My 4 year old 800 still seems to have good battery life but then it does not have Bluetooth, Wifi, Glonoss, etc. I hope I did not make a mistake with the 820

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