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  1. #1
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    maintenance: what to do after every ride in rust-prone environment?

    I live close to the ocean, so rust is a huge issue with everything. I also sweat a lot, so my bike gets soaked every time I ride.

    What should I do with my bike after every ride, so that the rust from the ocean, and my sweat, don't damage it?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by rbhatup; 2 Weeks Ago at 05:41 PM.

  2. #2
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    I live on the oceanfront. There is no issue with rust or salt water at all in my experience. You'd have to live in some place where there are big rollers coming in with regular strong sea breeze. We don't get that here

    but yeah salt from sweat can be significant.

    after a ride, the bike gets a thorough ... rest against a wall. if there's sweat accum on the frame, I just rub on some WD40 (Ti frame)
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  3. #3
    'brifter' is a lame word.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbhatup View Post
    I live close to the ocean, so rust is a huge issue with everything. I also sweat a lot, so my bike gets soaked every time I ride.

    What should I do with my bike after every ride, so that the rust from the ocean, and my sweat, don't damage it?

    Thanks.
    If you posted your questions in the correct section you might get some really good and useful advice.

    Components, Wrenching
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  4. #4
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    I live on the gulf coast...copious sweating this time of year in particular with salt build up after each ride.

    Nothing extraordinary. I am pretty anal about my bike. I tend to wipe it down most rides to get rid of the salt. I use wet microfiber cloth with car wash soap. Biggest hard to reach area...under hood boots of shifters which pack with salt over time. I ride Campy mechanical Ultrashift 11s. The aluminum bolt heads that retain the shifter clamps...if left unaddressed, corrode and I have even had to cut the bands off with a Dremel because the bolt heads were too corroded to gain purchase with torx bit.

    So occasionally, remove the shifter hoods...toothbrush clamp bolt heads in recessed pocket in shifter body with detergent, rinse and blow out with compressed air. Relube shifter internals if some water wicks in when cleaning...best access to shifter internals for lubrication...sewing machine oil works pretty well...is inverting the bike.

    The salt will corrode components but overall if you make a point to remove it after you ride most of the time, you should be ok.
    Of course keep your chain lubed...I use a wax based lube called White Lightening.
    Only thing I have to replace are the Campy shifter bands because I don't like removing the boots from my shifters that often...but this in only once every year or two and just chalk it up to maintenance expense. I replace the clamps and bolts when I redo the cables or decide to try another handlebar or change my set up.
    Last edited by 11spd; 2 Weeks Ago at 02:42 AM.

  5. #5
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    I don't have an issue with sweat, nor salt air, but do wipe my bike down with a product called Wash Wax All. It gets wiped on then wiped off. No water needed. Then I just do normal chain lube, and other regular lube when needed.
    Last edited by Pilot321; 2 Weeks Ago at 05:15 AM.

  6. #6
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    After sweaty rides, rinse the bike with water. If you don't have access to a hose, use a 2 gallon paint sprayer. The sweat will stick to the bike if left to dry too long; I use a large, soft brush such as that found with dustpans. You need not be detailed and fastidious with this-spend no more than 3 minutes spraying/brushing.

    A rag dipped in a bucket of water works, too. To save time, get a bucket with a lid such as a used plastic container from detergent or joint compound. Leave the rag and water in the bucket and put the cover on when stored.

    Pay attention to cable guides, edges, corners, nooks and crannies, but don't obsess.

    Water alone is harmless so there's no need to dry the bike when done. Bounce it a couple times and lean it against the wall. It's the salt reacting with humidity which long term causes problems.

  7. #7
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    Unless you normally ride in rain or on wet roads, probably the best thing you can do to prevent corrosion on your bike is to store it in your house - and I mean NOT in the garage, basement or shed.

    For profuse sweaters, handlebar corrosion can be an issue that can ruin your day to say the least:
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  8. #8
    ngl
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbhatup View Post
    I live close to the ocean, so rust is a huge issue with everything. I also sweat a lot, so my bike gets soaked every time I ride.

    What should I do with my bike after every ride, so that the rust from the ocean, and my sweat, don't damage it?

    Thanks.
    How about cleaning and lubing it?

  9. #9
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    Wash and wax the paint just like one does a car. The wax will protect the paint from sweat and other stuff. This is what I do and I sweat a ton. I'm anal about keeping my ride clean, especially my chain, cassette and other components.

  10. #10
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    It starts when you build the bike. Make sure all bolts/fasteners have proper grease or anti-seize. Don't use galvanized cables, only stainless steel or unobtanium. Also make sure that hardware isn't subject to corrosion, use only ti, stainless steel or alum, but alum isn't practical for all applications. And rebuild your bike once a year.

  11. #11
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    Aluminum bolts have very poor tensile strength, and will fail easily. Also, an aluminum bolt in a steel frame will set up a galvanic cell, which will only add to the corrosion.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  12. #12
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    Depending on riding conditions I usually wipe down my bike post ride, do a quick inspection of rims, tires, brakes, cables and all fasteners. If the bike is needing a wash, I simple use warm soapy water with a lite rinse and sometimes use compressed air to dry. Periodically I will pull the wheel set and use a plastic brush and gently scrub the cassette and clean the chain and crank. Then lube drive chain and dry the frame with terry cloth towel.

  13. #13
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    I would only add, get 316 (better than typical 304 grade found in hardware stores) stainless steel bolts/nuts and replace all of them on your bike that you can. Yes, as mentioned, make sure you apply anti-seize or marine grade grease (cheap to find). You'll probably have to order the replacement parts on-line. It made a noticeable difference for me when I was living in FL a long time ago but it's also helped with MI winters for my commuter bike.

    During the winter, I also rinse my bike real quick in the shower/tub after every ride and keep a spare can of WD-40 to spray down the drivetrain and relube afterwards. This has kept my winter commuter still in fairly good shape after 7 seasons. I always park my bikes indoors on a tarp (so they can drip dry).
    p.s. and for all you SS freaks out there...ya' know, some people want to go faster than what gravity allows when going downhill. I'm just sayin'....

    To bad carbon bikes don't have the same abilities as our carbon based bodies....namely, the ability to regenerate after an accident.

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabpn View Post
    I would only add, get 316 (better than typical 304 grade found in hardware stores) stainless steel bolts/nuts and replace all of them on your bike that you can. Yes, as mentioned, make sure you apply anti-seize or marine grade grease (cheap to find). You'll probably have to order the replacement parts on-line. It made a noticeable difference for me when I was living in FL a long time ago but it's also helped with MI winters for my commuter bike.

    During the winter, I also rinse my bike real quick in the shower/tub after every ride and keep a spare can of WD-40 to spray down the drivetrain and relube afterwards. This has kept my winter commuter still in fairly good shape after 7 seasons. I always park my bikes indoors on a tarp (so they can drip dry).
    Winter? What is this winter you speak of?

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