Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 72
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    24,094
    Quote Originally Posted by davelikestoplay View Post
    I too love the rube goldberg speedplays.. perfect for my bad knees. I have two pairs.

    As to 12spd.. Agree campy is a day late and a dollar short with this idea. I am a satisfied campy 11 user who will likely never change
    Yep, Speedplay got raves from those in the know at the shop. They're so nice and easy to click into, just mash the foot down. The trouble is walking on those massive "cleats," if you can call them that. Basically, the pedal cage is screwed right on to the shoe, and it clicks onto the pedal spindle.

    When Looks came out, many riders balked at their wimpy size. The shoes weren't stiff enough and riders would hurt their feet pressing down on the wimpy cleats. Keirin racers, drag racers on bikes, stuck with rat trap caged pedals because of the wider shoe-pedal interface. Shimano came out with wider pedals, and Look soon followed. Speedplay cleats cover almost the same area as a rat trap pedal cage, which is why they're so comfortable.

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    24,094
    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    ...And Fredrico's perspective is colored by riding bikes in the 1800's.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3B_M4dLb44

    Stumbled over this last night, the bikes of Paris-Roubaix. Check out the chainrings! They're all using 53/44 or 54/46! How about that? Paris-Roubaix is a flat course. Riders use the highest gears their legs can handle, claiming that slower cadences even out the cobble stone rattles, the wrists don't go dead, and they finish not quite as beat up as if they were spinning low gears. They can also shift lots in the front, as the gears are close together.

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3B_M4dLb44

    Stumbled over this last night, the bikes of Paris-Roubaix. Check out the chainrings! They're all using 53/44 or 54/46! How about that? Paris-Roubaix is a flat course. Riders use the highest gears their legs can handle, claiming that slower cadences even out the cobble stone rattles, the wrists don't go dead, and they finish not quite as beat up as if they were spinning low gears. They can also shift lots in the front, as the gears are close together.
    Absolutely. Mashing dramatically lowers assault to the body because legs bare more of the weight burden. Most of us implicitly shift up over the rough stuff to save our bodies and lower pressure on the saddle.

  4. #29
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,817
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3B_M4dLb44

    Stumbled over this last night, the bikes of Paris-Roubaix. Check out the chainrings! They're all using 53/44 or 54/46! How about that? Paris-Roubaix is a flat course. Riders use the highest gears their legs can handle, claiming that slower cadences even out the cobble stone rattles, the wrists don't go dead, and they finish not quite as beat up as if they were spinning low gears. They can also shift lots in the front, as the gears are close together.
    That's a cool video. I noticed four of the teams had Campy components on their bikes. Has Campy stepped up it's team sponsorship lately? This 12-speed "improvement" strikes me as something done out of desperation.

    Only saw one crank that looked like SRAM (where did they go?), and two of the Shimano cranks I saw looked to be 9000 and not 9100. 28 wide tires seem to be the universal choice.

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    24,094
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    That's a cool video. I noticed four of the teams had Campy components on their bikes. Has Campy stepped up it's team sponsorship lately? This 12-speed "improvement" strikes me as something done out of desperation.

    Only saw one crank that looked like SRAM (where did they go?), and two of the Shimano cranks I saw looked to be 9000 and not 9100. 28 wide tires seem to be the universal choice.
    Noticed the 28 mm tires. They're tubulars, nice and light, and fat enough to handle those cobbles just fine.

    Is there a nice 28 mm clincher as light as those tubulars? I'll take it. 28 mm Gatorskins on the commuter are a bit harsh. Would be nice to run high thread count 28s. They'd ride closer to the tubs like those pictured.

    Good to see Campy still has market share with the pros in Europe. Campy never did have that large a presence in the US market. Not enough depth in the American road racing culture to appreciate the difference between Campy and Shimano.

  6. #31
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,817
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Noticed the 28 mm tires. They're tubulars, nice and light, and fat enough to handle those cobbles just fine.

    Is there a nice 28 mm clincher as light as those tubulars? I'll take it. 28 mm Gatorskins on the commuter are a bit harsh. Would be nice to run high thread count 28s. They'd ride closer to the tubs like those pictured.

    Good to see Campy still has market share with the pros in Europe. Campy never did have that large a presence in the US market. Not enough depth in the American road racing culture to appreciate the difference between Campy and Shimano.
    Vittoria Corsa G+ clinchers. 28mm, 265 grams. Nicest riding tire I've ever used. Kind of a classic look too. I bought a case and am replacing all the tires in the fleet with these things as they wear out.

    https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/vitto...yre/#pid=30363

  7. #32
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,628
    Shame on Campy for innovating.

  8. #33
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Vittoria Corsa G+ clinchers. 28mm, 265 grams. Nicest riding tire I've ever used. Kind of a classic look too. I bought a case and am replacing all the tires in the fleet with these things as they wear out.

    https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/vitto...yre/#pid=30363
    pmf,
    what tubes you running in your Corsas?

    You may enjoy this if you haven't seen it for rolling resistance comparison to other popular tires:

    https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...-graphene-2016
    Last edited by 11spd; 04-13-2018 at 11:08 AM.

  9. #34
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Shame on Campy for innovating.
    True when their so called innovation is fraught with performance challenges.

    They would have been better off offering cost effective wider cassettes like 34-11 in 11s.

  10. #35
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    They would have been better off offering cost effective wider cassettes like 34-11 in 11s.
    From your first post:

    "I donít need ... broader gearing"

  11. #36
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,817
    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    pmf,
    what tubes you running in your Corsas?

    You may enjoy this if you haven't seen it for rolling resistance comparison to other popular tires:

    https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...-graphene-2016
    Either Continental or Michelin tubes. Whatever is at the top of the pile. So, it looks like the rolling resistance and puncture ratings are about the same as similar tires. I had GP4000S II tires on the bikes (one still has Michelin Pro 4). I've got maybe a half dozen of the GP4000S tires in my basement. I don't know what it is about these tires -- and maybe its just in my head -- but they seem to roll nicer and corner better. And I'm not the person who will tell you I notice a difference between butyl and latex tubes, or an aluminum versus carbon seat post. You can put a whole cup of pees under my mattress and I'll sleep like a drunk sailor.

  12. #37
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
    From your first post:

    "I donít need ... broader gearing"
    Thanks for telling me what I need..lol.
    I don't. Many do. If people knew anything about gearing and most don't...if they lived with sizable elevation change, most would do best with a 50/34 and 11-32. Unlike Shimano and Sram, Campy has been slow to respond to offering 32t cassettes...but they do now also much cheaper to run a Shimano freehub and 11-32 Ultegra cassette with Campy driveline.
    I live where its principally flat so I don't need broader gearing. But others might and many times do.
    Get it?

  13. #38
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,817
    Time pedals back in the 1990's were pretty stout. I think the whole hot spot issue with small pedals has been rendered moot by shoes with stiff carbon soles.

    I always liked how Speedplay advertised the low weight of the pedal without throwing the weight of the cleat, which is half the pedal, in. I've never tried them . Seems like unlimited float might not be a good thing. And as you say, pretty annoying to walk around on those cleats.

  14. #39
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Time pedals back in the 1990's were pretty stout. I think the whole hot spot issue with small pedals has been rendered moot by shoes with stiff carbon soles.

    I always liked how Speedplay advertised the low weight of the pedal without throwing the weight of the cleat, which is half the pedal, in. I've never tried them . Seems like unlimited float might not be a good thing. And as you say, pretty annoying to walk around on those cleats.
    Speedplays are awesome. I have ridden all kinds of pedals. Unlimited float is a good thing if you have a clean pedal stroke. I do and run my float wide open.

    Biggest benefit of Speedplays is ability to run them about 12mm rearward toward mid foot...what I do as well...without special drilling the shoes. For those with longer feet, this puts less stress on the Achilles and those susceptible to plantar facia.

    Only real downside of Speedplays is...they can clog pretty easily if stepping on soft ground...sandy wet soil etc.

    They are very robust in terms of mileage...both pedal and cleats. I try not to walk in them.

  15. #40
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,817
    I switched all my bike pedals to Time ATAC a number of years ago simply because probably 80% of the miles I ride are commuting, and I have to walk on a marble floor to my office.

    I used to think mountain bike pedals on a road bike was a sin. My wife and I did a bike vacation with Andy Hampsten's Chinghiale tour group. Before we left, he recommended using mountain bike pedals because we would stop and walk around at various places. They worked great. I finally gave up on road pedals maybe 6-7 years ago when I realized that I wasn't riding one of my bikes because it had road pedals on it.

  16. #41
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Thanks for telling me what I need..lol.
    In no way did I mean to imply what kind of gearing you needed. I was just curious why you felt that Campy "would have been better off offering cost effective wider cassettes like 34-11 in 11s" if you personally didn't see the usefulness of it.

  17. #42
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
    In no way did I mean to imply what kind of gearing you needed. I was just curious why you felt that Campy "would have been better off offering cost effective wider cassettes like 34-11 in 11s" if you personally didn't see the usefulness of it.
    Because the vast majority of weaker riders who live in areas of elevation difference could benefit from wider gearing. The true benefit of more cogs in back is for the same relative cog spacing in terms of gear inches, a rider can have shorter gears to climb and taller gearing to descend.

    I ride a custom 50/38...my given name for it is a baby standard for the simple reason that I don't need more than a 50-11 based upon my strength nor need the climbing or descending gear inches of a 50-34 with wide cassette in back for greater breadth of gearing.

    An average rider living in hilly terrain would benefit greatly from a 50-34 and 11-32 in my opinion. There have been times when riding a century in hilly country I have traveled to I wished I had it too and remember the agony.

  18. #43
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I switched all my bike pedals to Time ATAC a number of years ago simply because probably 80% of the miles I ride are commuting, and I have to walk on a marble floor to my office.

    I used to think mountain bike pedals on a road bike was a sin. My wife and I did a bike vacation with Andy Hampsten's Chinghiale tour group. Before we left, he recommended using mountain bike pedals because we would stop and walk around at various places. They worked great. I finally gave up on road pedals maybe 6-7 years ago when I realized that I wasn't riding one of my bikes because it had road pedals on it.
    Yes, many have made the transition to mtb shoes and pedals for that reason. They walk around a fair amount off their bikes.
    I either ride road pedals or platform. I am perfectly comfortable riding platform pedals whereas some don't like them. Honestly, I don't give up much speed on platform pedals as well. Only major difference is climbing out of the saddle and sprinting of course...latter I make a point of avoiding. But for steady state riding I am fine on platforms with a good pair of tennis shoes.

  19. #44
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,882
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Noticed the 28 mm tires. They're tubulars, nice and light, and fat enough to handle those cobbles just fine.

    Is there a nice 28 mm clincher as light as those tubulars? I'll take it. 28 mm Gatorskins on the commuter are a bit harsh. Would be nice to run high thread count 28s. They'd ride closer to the tubs like those pictured.

    Good to see Campy still has market share with the pros in Europe. Campy never did have that large a presence in the US market. Not enough depth in the American road racing culture to appreciate the difference between Campy and Shimano.
    https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/co...-chinook-pass/
    Too old to ride plastic

  20. #45
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,423
    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    Either Continental or Michelin tubes. Whatever is at the top of the pile. So, it looks like the rolling resistance and puncture ratings are about the same as similar tires. I had GP4000S II tires on the bikes (one still has Michelin Pro 4). I've got maybe a half dozen of the GP4000S tires in my basement. I don't know what it is about these tires -- and maybe its just in my head -- but they seem to roll nicer and corner better. And I'm not the person who will tell you I notice a difference between butyl and latex tubes, or an aluminum versus carbon seat post. You can put a whole cup of pees under my mattress and I'll sleep like a drunk sailor.
    Love your last sentence pmf. You rock bro...lol.

  21. #46
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    8,107
    When will it end?

  22. #47
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Because the vast majority of weaker riders who live in areas of elevation difference could benefit from wider gearing.
    Okay, let's assume that's true.

    The true benefit of more cogs in back is for the same relative cog spacing in terms of gear inches, a rider can have shorter gears to climb and taller gearing to descend.
    You seem to be making an argument for more gears in back, i.e. the majority of weaker riders could use a wider range, and more gears in back gives them a wider range without increasing the gear spacing.

  23. #48
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,873
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3B_M4dLb44

    Stumbled over this last night, the bikes of Paris-Roubaix. Check out the chainrings! They're all using 53/44 or 54/46! How about that? Paris-Roubaix is a flat course. Riders use the highest gears their legs can handle, claiming that slower cadences even out the cobble stone rattles, the wrists don't go dead, and they finish not quite as beat up as if they were spinning low gears. They can also shift lots in the front, as the gears are close together.
    OMG! Look at all those rim brakes!. What are these people neanderthals?

  24. #49
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,628
    Shame on you Campy for not checking with internet Windbag 11sp before innovating.

  25. #50
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    24,094
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    OMG! Look at all those rim brakes!. What are these people neanderthals?
    Racing on Medieval cobblestones is close! Hinault and LeMond considered P-R sadomasochistic.

    Those paper thin wimpy discs wouldn't hold up hitting the cobblestones at 25 mph. The heavier forks to hold up under disc braking are not as shock absorbent as the rim brake versions. Wheel changes on that brutal course are problematic. Are these brakes now self-centering?

    And look at those chain rings! I'm thinking about putting the 44 t. on this Spring, just for kicks. It was a sweet gear on the flats, and could handle the climbs, with minor adjustments, as well as the 42. 44, 46, are great on the flats, as single speed riders, and those P-R riders will attest.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-05-2015, 10:51 AM
  2. By the way (as Ed goes, the pandemic goes) ...
    By OES in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-01-2009, 11:25 AM
  3. And another one goes; and another one goes...
    By rocco in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-26-2008, 09:16 PM
  4. There goes the neighborhood... cycling goes mainstream
    By funknuggets in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-27-2005, 06:59 PM
  5. As goes the father, so goes the Shrub
    By AJS in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 100
    Last Post: 07-13-2004, 12:49 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest RoadBike Articles

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.