Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    448

    cleaning water bottle nozzle- (podium)

    What can I use to clean inside the narrow opening? I have fungi-like material, even after bleach rinsing.

    I am thinking of (not sure of name) interdental tips.

  2. #2
    Do what he say!
    Reputation: texasnewb's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,062
    If you have fungi that you can't rid with bleach...it's time for a new water bottle. FWIW, I clean my bottles out with hot soap and water soon after every ride...fill up with hot water and soap, shake, then squeeze the soapy water through the opening. Rinse. Air dry. No fungi.
    I don't want to talk to you no more, you empty headed animal food trough wiper. I fart in your general direction. Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries.

    No go away, or I shall taunt you a second time.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    152
    Yeah, that, qtips, or don't chance some crazy stomach bug and just recycle it, and invest in a new bottle and top combo.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Newnan3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    961
    The first thing i do after a ride is rinse out my bottles if ive used a sports drink. I always squirt some clean water thru the nozzle and let everything dry. So far so good....

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    29
    Weak vinegar solution if you must.

  6. #6
    Excuses are for the weak.
    Reputation: Juzzy004's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    101
    I have the same bottles and despite washing them immediately after each ride, they do get rather yucky inside.
    Old toothbrushes, a little dish washing liquid and warm water are your tools of trade here, mate.
    Be very careful when using bleach on the lid. It can potentially damage the silicon valve and may lead to distasteful residues in the bottle.
    Simply pull off the bite piece (may need a little persuasion, if for the first time), then apply a little soap (I use anti-bacterial). Get your toothbrush into all the nooks and cranny's, especially under the inside of the lid.
    Rinse with warm water and replace the bite piece. Easy peasy...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cleaning water bottle nozzle- (podium)-img_1653.jpg   cleaning water bottle nozzle- (podium)-img_1654.jpg   cleaning water bottle nozzle- (podium)-img_1657.jpg  
    It never gets easier - you just go faster
    __________________________________________________
    2014 Pinarello Dogma 65.1 Think 2 860
    2013 Pinarello Dogma 65.1 Think 2 BoB
    2012 Pinarello Dogma 2
    2007 Look 585

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    448
    wow, thanks! if this could be a sticky

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Stumpjumper FSR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    394

    Try This!

    I take apart the Jet Valve and clean with dish soap and a small brush

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xrlbzm4FKXw

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: RJP Diver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,507
    I always remove the nozzle and rinse with soap and water and let dry completely after every use. I take a soft toothbrush to it every now and then. Been doing this for more than two years on current bottles and they are all still "like new" at this point. Looks like perhaps you haven't been removing the nozzle when rinsing/cleaning? Putting them away wet?
    "It ain't a teacup that the Queen gave you - it's a bike. Ride it!"

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: looigi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    5,607
    Yeah. This is one of the issues with the cammelbak bottles. I've taken mine apart to clean out mold but find that rinsing it very well right after riding works for preventing it: First rinse the bottle well with hot tap water, then fill the bottle with hot water and shoot it through the valve, and finally run hot tap water into the rubber outlet. That last step is important because shooting water through the valve doesn't really clean out around the outside of the flapper valve.

    The main problem with mold it not the mold per se, but the toxins it produces. Molds make some of the most potent and lethal toxins known.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: drmayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    172
    Just an FYI - if you use the polar insulated bottles - they will send you free replacement tops for life. After a while they all get nasty.

  12. #12
    Steaming piles of opinion
    Reputation: danl1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    10,524
    Quote Originally Posted by looigi View Post
    Yeah. This is one of the issues with the cammelbak bottles.
    Honestly, I think it's with all bottles - it's simply more noticeable on the Camelbacks. Most tops are black-on-black, so you don't get to see the gook.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: looigi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    5,607
    Quote Originally Posted by danl1 View Post
    Honestly, I think it's with all bottles - it's simply more noticeable on the Camelbacks. Most tops are black-on-black, so you don't get to see the gook.
    Been riding for over 40 years have a similar number of bottles. Simple preemptive rinsing that's always worked for those didn't do the trick for the Cammelbak bottles. There're just way more parts, nooks and crannies in these valves for stuff to get stuck in.

    Another thing less than perfect with these valves compared to traditional bottles is they tend to suck air when getting towards the end, and always leave a few ml of fluid you can't get out.

    The valves on traditional bottles also make it very easy to hold the bottle with your teeth whereas you need to bite down pretty hard on the rubber tip of the Cammelbak valves to hold it with your teeth.

    Certainly not big issues, but less than ideal.
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    87

    podium

    I always rinse my bottles immediately the ride, fill with water and store in the fridge. this does a pretty good job of keeping things relatively clean.

    When I've had fungi build up (usually from a sports drink and not clean as above), I take the top apart completely and soak overnight in diluted bleach. I haven't had any issues with a bleach taste or with the jet valve

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,907

    there are a lot of parts in there!

    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumper FSR View Post
    I take apart the Jet Valve and clean with dish soap and a small brush

    How To: Disassemble Camelbak Water Bottle Nozzle - YouTube
    That seems like a pretty big hassle. Best part is where he stabs himself with the knife at 2:07. I think I will stick with a bleach rinse and just toss them when the get bad. To the OP, I find running a Q-Tip with alcohol on it cleans the gunk inside the nozle

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    517
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    That seems like a pretty big hassle. Best part is where he stabs himself with the knife at 2:07. I think I will stick with a bleach rinse and just toss them when the get bad. To the OP, I find running a Q-Tip with alcohol on it cleans the gunk inside the nozle
    The nipple comes off easily if you put the top on the bottle and pull. Getting the nipple off is easier if the bottle and your hands are dry.

    I use a 18 mm cone wrench to pry off the cylinder and valve part. You can take the valve out of the cylinder and put it back in if you want to really get at all the nooks and crannies. I've also soaked the parts in a bowl filled with water and one of those Camel Bak bladder cleaning tablets.

    Trust me, you want to do this. If you think merely rinsing, washing with hot soapy water, and then rising again it cleaning your bottle, you'll want to disassemble it and see for yourself.

    I've done the rinse, wash, etc. but I live in a very humid area where things don't dry all that well. Add in a few trips to rides or races that are a few hours away and chances are you have fungi growing under the valve.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by drmayer View Post
    Just an FYI - if you use the polar insulated bottles - they will send you free replacement tops for life. After a while they all get nasty.
    That's pretty awesome! Didn't know that. Too bad I like my Podiums too much.

  18. #18
    Fax Transport Specialist
    Reputation: black_box's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    471
    Quote Originally Posted by looigi View Post
    Another thing less than perfect with these valves compared to traditional bottles is they tend to suck air when getting towards the end, and always leave a few ml of fluid you can't get out.
    This is my complaint with the camelbak podium and also polar ice bottles. The camelbak top is cute, but I think I'd rather have the extra ounce of fluid.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,645
    Juzzy004 has it with pic to boot.

    Also, what you put in the bottle can contribute to "growth." Things like Cytomax and other things that have carbs in the mix tend get "yucky" real fast.

    Products like Nuun don't get gross too fast. (personal experience)
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: ddimick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    582
    I fill the bottle with water and drop in one or two Efferdent tablets. Remove the silicon bite part and drop in the bottle, lid gets placed upside-down on the top of the bottle so that the valve is hanging into the cleaning solution. After a soak I put the lid on and squirt the cleaning solution through the valve to empty the bottle.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: martinrm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    139
    Another thing about those bottles, if you just keep water in it then it will never grow mold. Otherwise your going have to take it appart every few weeks and clean it out which is fine. What i do is get a paper towel and roll it up then stick it in the nozzle cleaning all the mold out. Then washing it with soap.

  22. #22
    Resident Curmudgeon
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    14,094
    After every use I put about a 1/4 of a bottle of H2O2 in the bottle, shake well, then squirt it out the nozzle. then the bottle & the top go in the dishwasher. I also use a small brush that I found at the drug store in the oral care dept. It's meant for brushing gunk from between your teeth. Once in a while I'll fill a cereal bowl 1/2 full with H2O2 & soak the lid in it for 10 min or so. I think that's enough to penetrate all the parts & it doesn't leave any taste or smell.
    Don't believe everything you think.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Sea Otter Classic

Hot Deals

Contest


Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook