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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by biscut View Post
    I understand this is a serious road cyclist forum with a depth of knowledge from people who have many miles under their belt and lots of experience.

    As a new road guy this thread makes your head spin...after all these pages I'm not sure if I should hammer the next hill, sit and spin up It, or man....walk it!

    For those that have said 1800 miles is a joke...maybe it isn't for you. I can say my target this year is 2k miles. That's no joke for me. I have kids, active kids in sports, family and a job. My job isn't one I can bike to either.

    Just because I may be limited in my time I can put in right now, does not mean I can't get an equal amount of satisfaction or seek to continually improve.
    Given your fit to the bike is ok just do what comes naturally. It's really just pedaling a bike and not all that confusing. These how to pedal discussions get bogged down the same way all the time. Honestly, IMO your body adapts to the bike/fit you have really well and will naturally fire muscles in the most efficient way to generate the most power for whatever effort you happen to be doing.

    While I don't believe in some free lunch technique I have found two limiters to cycling in general that are amplified climbing: 1) The ability to move oxygen. It is not necessary to have huge muscles to push decent power especially to climb. I suppose in the super short efforts like a 200m sprint on the track there is some amazing amount of specificity with muscle building that aids short term power generation. But for most of us big muscles mean more oxygen and with poor pathways or delivery system in general to get the O2 to where it's needed the muscle won't help. How to improve? Ride frequently and ride more...

    2) Cutting weight is about the only free lunch out there but it's not free either. Being lighter I think is obvious why it helps climbing but being lean(er) is helpful to help VO2max or in general getting oxygen to the muscles. How to improve? Put the fork down.

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodys737 View Post
    Given your fit to the bike is ok just do what comes naturally. It's really just pedaling a bike and not all that confusing. These how to pedal discussions get bogged down the same way all the time. Honestly, IMO your body adapts to the bike/fit you have really well and will naturally fire muscles in the most efficient way to generate the most power for whatever effort you happen to be doing.

    While I don't believe in some free lunch technique I have found two limiters to cycling in general that are amplified climbing: 1) The ability to move oxygen. It is not necessary to have huge muscles to push decent power especially to climb. I suppose in the super short efforts like a 200m sprint on the track there is some amazing amount of specificity with muscle building that aids short term power generation. But for most of us big muscles mean more oxygen and with poor pathways or delivery system in general to get the O2 to where it's needed the muscle won't help. How to improve? Ride frequently and ride more...

    2) Cutting weight is about the only free lunch out there but it's not free either. Being lighter I think is obvious why it helps climbing but being lean(er) is helpful to help VO2max or in general getting oxygen to the muscles. How to improve? Put the fork down.
    What he said.

    But, man, the fork is my favorite tool.
    Too old to ride plastic

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Nothing there supports your myth that you're going to "save your quads for later".
    And it takes a real genius to understand that if you conserve the quads early in the ride by shifting the focus and load to the glutes and hamstrings, the biggest muscles in the body, that the quads will be fresher later in the ride.

    You just keep believing what the Tread guy implies, there is no possibility to improve your pedaling technique. I guess we are all born with perfect pedaling technique and we should believe one guy who says there is no possibility for improvement but who then goes on and lists two ways, one of which is the one you keep trashing me about.

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodys737 View Post
    How to improve? Ride frequently and ride more....

    Whew! Back to basics!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    It really conceals his age. Especially since his picture is George Peppard. Aka John "Hannibal" Smith of the A-Team. And he died... in 1994 @ age 65.

    John "Hannibal" Smith
    Thanks, tlg!

    May I add the nurse's comment when I was in ER getting checked out after my latest accident, "You sure don't look your age, sir!"

    I reminded her the regenerative possibilities of the human body extend into old age, citing the 104 year old Swiss cyclist who's doctor asked him to increase his cadence slightly over the next few months to see if there would be fitness gains, and sure enough, the cyclist's averages got faster--at the age of 104.

    It made my day! I owe it all to eating lots of fish and cycling, mostly cycling. There's hope for us all! Keep riding, fellows! You too will be admired by the ladies.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 1 Week Ago at 08:29 AM.

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Whew! Back to basics!
    Yep. And try everything. Don't just fall into one routine. Vary the intensities and durations. Do a little of everything. The body will respond, you will become a versatile rider and have more fun.

  7. #157
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    To make sure I understand, telling a new rider that 1800 miles in 10 month is "nothing" is your approach to motivation?

    Further, this rider did not ask for advice on general fitness but rather specifically on climbing. Neither you or I have any idea how much of that 1800 miles was climbing, however, from the drift of his post, it is probably safe to assume not much.

    To suggest he can not improve his climbing without losing weight is nonsense. It may be true it would be the easiest way, however, without further evidence to the contrary, I assume he can walk and chew gum simultaneously. If he is now doing 80% flats and 20% intermediate climbing/descending, he can increase climbing and mix in some intervals while working on his weight problem. Strict structure is likely the fastest way for him to burn out on cycling at this point.

    I think you would do well to realize that, for the most part, other posters were addressing the question he was asking. He was not asking how to lose weight--he was not asking how to improve his overall cycling performance, he was not asking about much of anything beyond how to improve his climbing (it should be understood it is a specific question and inherently requests answers related to that topic, other factors notwithstanding.

    Finally, ending a sentence with the word "period" is a technique used exclusively by those knowingly spewing bullsh!t ("if you want to keep your health care plan, you can, Period").
    Quote Originally Posted by stan01 View Post
    What level of reading comprehension are you at??? Because you clearly didn't understand any of my post. I assume from all the criticisms that you have given to other posters that you must clearly be a certified coach. A cycling genius If the OP in his first year did only 1800 miles then that is indeed nothing.... because as anyone knows in cycling, you have nowhere else to go but up. All I read up to the point when I posted was everyone telling the OP, yeah do more hills, lots & lots of hills. Do hill intervals. More hills the better.

    That is such a narrow minded point of view especially for someone that is just starting to get into this sport. Ask any certified cycling coach for their opinions on this & then re-read my post. For a novice cyclist, it is my belief that the person would be better suited to become a better cyclist overall. Losing weight by riding more structured rides with others & improved diet as I originally stated will help him lose weight & ultimately will help lower his climbing time as a collateral benefit.

    No one has mentioned base mileage, aerobic vs anaerobic & workout structure or duration. Everyone is just saying do lots of hills, hill sprints over & over. There are a lot of trolls here that love giving intentional bad advice. Even if the OP didn't use a coach as I mentioned, he still has the option of joining a club as I suggested. No club will do more than 2 rides a week with consecutive intensive climbing involved unless you live in an area that is all hills. Who wants to join a club where all you do is climb all the time??? No one even bothers to mention recovery or rest when they advocate all these hill repeats. Why is that?? Unless you're doped up to the gills, no one is training like what is being suggested here & let's be honest cuz what I'm hearing here is total BS.

    More importantly without the proper base mileage, a rider that starts doing hill intervals & sprints as suggested by so many here risks getting injured. If you think I'm wrong on this, then I suggest you read Lemond's book with regards to this. If you are really an expert in exercise physiology then you will know that as others have mentioned that power to weight is key here for the OP. But what type of cycling will help him lose weight faster?? It's been proven that running will gain the greatest weight loss.

    What type of cycling though will offer the greatest weight loss benefit?? Will doing lots of hill repeats as so many here have suggested help him lose more weight??? All this research has been done & readily available & I can tell you that doing a routine of hill repeats alone will not lead to greater weight loss vs other cycling programs. To just do one thing over & over is narrow approach which is why I gave my opinion of a broader, more balanced approach. Clubs have a structured ride program for a reason. They want the riders to enjoy the different rides available but also to help them improve in all areas. I'm here because I want to help others learn & be better riders overall & not just sit on the side lines criticizing others for your own benefit without helping anyone at all.

  8. #158
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    ?????

  9. #159
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    [QUOTE=n2deep;5150173]
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    It really conceals his age. Especially since his picture is George Peppard. Aka John "Hannibal" Smith

    No,, Say It Ain't True Yu'all!!!!! Too Funny!!!!

  10. #160
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    A sincere thanks long time members and prolific posters for the truly entertaining replies.

  11. #161
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    [QUOTE=n2deep;5150175]
    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post


    No,, Say It Ain't True Yu'all!!!!! Too Funny!!!!
    To quote the immortal Colonel Hannibal Smith, "I love it when a plan comes together!"

  12. #162
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    I have that whole fork thing down! I find a lot of truth in the dropping weight off your self! and the comments about your body adjusting to a bike that fits. Subconsciously when I run what I call my training run (26 mile no heavy hills) I find I'm spending more time in the drops to push some speed; feel more flexible; and my cadence over the 26 miles is 86 with more and more time spent in the 90's. I'm not bouncing over 105 like I was initially....

    How does this translate to hills? From a newb, tells me just go do it. Let your body adjust.

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