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  1. #26
    Darling of The Lounge
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    My coldest start was just above freezing for a Solvang Century a few years ago.

    By the finish, temps hit near 70 degrees.

  2. #27
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    Last winter I was commuting a lot, even at -15C or -17C (2F) This year, hasn't been that cold until now, when I'm off for the holidays.

    That's really not impressive after you visit Montreal, where people travel by bike all year, even at -30C and snow nearly to the axles in some places.

  3. #28
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    I've gone as low as 22F, but over a 13.5-mile commute it would partially freeze my water bottle and completely ice over my helmet's eye shield.
    Ghurarmu shirkush agh azgushu. Zant ya apakurizak. Gl-n anakhizak.

  4. #29
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    dunno. I've been known to do between 150 to 200 miles in the month of February in the North East without issue. To get over the 8,000 mile per year mark you have to ride at least 150 miles in the month of February. It's a mathematical must.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together
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  5. #30
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    Then again, I'm very level headed without a developed nervous system on pain.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together
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  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by config View Post
    My cutoff for cycling is 40 deg. Anything colder than that then I should be skiing.
    Or walking. Those headwinds are brutal. Toes, fingers, nose, ears get chilled below 40 at varying intervals. Rode home once against a snowstorm blowing in, 22F. Fortunately it wasn't sticking to the roads yet. Basic survival instinct was going full blast. The colder it gets the harder ya gotta work to keep warm.

    Northerners might adapt to perform in cold weather, but living in temperate climes, my nose gets runny, eyes tear up, breathing fast is painful [I've gotten sore throats, colds from this], and muscles feel weak in the shock of freezing air. Warm ups take longer, but then the engine does fine down to the low 20s, about the coldest I've encountered. Kind of nice to take a swill out of the water bottle and taste cooling ice chips.

    Humans lose a lot of sweat in cold, dry air, and don't realize it. I've gotten cold a few times on longer rides from not drinking enough.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Or walking. Those headwinds are brutal. Toes, fingers, nose, ears get chilled below 40 at varying intervals. Rode home once against a snowstorm blowing in, 22F. Fortunately it wasn't sticking to the roads yet. Basic survival instinct was going full blast. The colder it gets the harder ya gotta work to keep warm.

    Northerners might adapt to perform in cold weather, but living in temperate climes, my nose gets runny, eyes tear up, breathing fast is painful [I've gotten sore throats, colds from this], and muscles feel weak in the shock of freezing air. Warm ups take longer, but then the engine does fine down to the low 20s, about the coldest I've encountered. Kind of nice to take a swill out of the water bottle and taste cooling ice chips.

    Humans lose a lot of sweat in cold, dry air, and don't realize it. I've gotten cold a few times on longer rides from not drinking enough.
    Forget cycling ... I was debating today whether it was too cold to walk the dog! Despite numerous layers, snowmobile gloves, and three pairs of wool socks I was freakin' cold

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Forget cycling ... I was debating today whether it was too cold to walk the dog! Despite numerous layers, snowmobile gloves, and three pairs of wool socks I was freakin' cold
    I've got a neighbor who walks an old Blood Hound and that dog likes to stop every 10\15 feet and check out her surroundings, don't matter how cold it gets. And no matter how the woman tries it get that hound to pick up the pace, the Blood Hound just don't care and is gonna stop and look.

    I enjoy watching those two.
    Too old to ride plastic

  9. #34
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    Being in Australia it doesn't get really cold...er or cold here. Had a ride last year where I spent about an hour of it at -3C (26F), was also very foggy, and no idea on the wind chill so I was covered in ice by the time I got out of it,and I wasn't really prepared that well, just longens and a jacket and winter gloves.

    I can ride down to 0C (32F) in just shorts (longens are better though) as I like the cold and anything over 22C (70F) I start to struggle.
    All the gear and no idea

  10. #35
    I make Eagles fly
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    High 20s commuting in Korea till I bought a car. Recreational riding, around 40 is my cutoff
    If you don't follow the liberal flock, you are called a troll.

  11. #36
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    I forget the precise temperature, but I'll never forget a bitterly cold decent of Mt. Ventoux. Gray day. Wind chills. Hydraulic fluid froze rock solid in the brake lines. Failing to navigate a turn, I crashed hard.

    Awoke in a hospital with a sack of dust and components on the chair next to me. Doc explained it was so cold the brittle carbon just shattered into countless tiny bits. They swept up what they could and brought it to me.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    i've done about 5 Fahrenheit but only as a commute under 3 miles. its a lot harder when its longer. My real issue is ice. It terrifies me.
    I used to commute year-round in central Michigan. Coldest was -22 F. For a road ride, around 34 (water bottles froze) but the day was warming so I did the full 110 miles.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    I forget the precise temperature, but I'll never forget a bitterly cold decent of Mt. Ventoux. Gray day. Wind chills. Hydraulic fluid froze rock solid in the brake lines. Failing to navigate a turn, I crashed hard.

    Awoke in a hospital with a sack of dust and components on the chair next to me. Doc explained it was so cold the brittle carbon just shattered into countless tiny bits. They swept up what they could and brought it to me.
    The carbon frame asploded and the hydraulic brakes froze, which just shows to go ya the benefits of retrogouchism.
    Too old to ride plastic

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    The carbon frame asploded and the hydraulic brakes froze, which just shows to go ya the benefits of retrogouchism.
    Indeed. Suffice to say, I learned "Steel is Real" the hard way.

    With that said, not 100% sure it would have made a difference.

    Doc said it was in the mid to upper 20's or something. Being just below freezing, I didn't think that was too bad, be he said he meant "Kelvin" ??? Not sure what that is. Might have something to do with that Climate Change stuff.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    I used to commute year-round in central Michigan. Coldest was -22 F. For a road ride, around 34 (water bottles froze) but the day was warming so I did the full 110 miles.
    Did it go above freezing? Once had a discussion with a skinny mate about frostbite. He complained his toes were "getting frost bitten!" Temps were 38F, well above freezing. "Don't see how toes could get frozen if the air is above freezing!" I reassured him. The laws of physics say I'm right, but that didn't alleviate the pain in his toes.

    In Iowa City, we'd feel it immediately when temps thawed out after weeks of below freezing. Glad I live in the sunny south [DC Metro]! A couple of days ago was the first time its stayed below freezing all day. We've got a solid week ahead of below freezing air, typical of Iowa winters. Didn't have a bike, but being penniless students, we walked everywhere. Ice crystals would form in the nostrils walking to class. It was brutal.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    I forget the precise temperature, but I'll never forget a bitterly cold decent of Mt. Ventoux. Gray day. Wind chills. Hydraulic fluid froze rock solid in the brake lines. Failing to navigate a turn, I crashed hard.

    Awoke in a hospital with a sack of dust and components on the chair next to me. Doc explained it was so cold the brittle carbon just shattered into countless tiny bits. They swept up what they could and brought it to me.
    Glad you made it through!

    More evidence against carbon fiber frames and hydraulic brakes?

    Grant Peterson's dictum stands, bikes are mechanical devices meant to be controlled manually by body movements. He still offers down tube friction shifting and 6 speed freewheels for that reason. Automating shifting, now perfected by electronics, took away a piece of that manual interface. And who woulda known? Hydraulic fluids freezing up when you need them the most! Are Shimano going to add antifreeze to their brake fluid? Multi-strand stainless steel cables don't freeze up in the cold.

    Velodog is right on! Care to say what bike it was that exploded on impact and where the breaks occurred?

    Kelvin is based on absolute 0. "Absolute zero is measured at 0 degrees Kelvin, which equals -273.15 degrees Celsius or -459.67 degrees Fahrenheit. It is the coldest temperature possible on the Kelvin scale."

    https://www.reference.com/science/te...%20temperature
    Last edited by Fredrico; 01-01-2018 at 11:25 AM.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    I forget the precise temperature, but I'll never forget a bitterly cold decent of Mt. Ventoux. Gray day. Wind chills. Hydraulic fluid froze rock solid in the brake lines. Failing to navigate a turn, I crashed hard.

    Awoke in a hospital with a sack of dust and components on the chair next to me. Doc explained it was so cold the brittle carbon just shattered into countless tiny bits. They swept up what they could and brought it to me.

    now i know why i climbed ventoux and stopped the ride there. ;)

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    now i know why i climbed ventoux and stopped the ride there. ;)
    Organizers didn't offer newspaper to stuff in the jersey and block the wind?

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Organizers didn't offer newspaper to stuff in the jersey and block the wind?

    actually it was well organized. i was spent and my support suggested me and another ride which completed it end it there. the third rider never made it up the climb

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    The carbon frame asploded and the hydraulic brakes froze, which just shows to go ya the benefits of retrogouchism.
    LOL. You actually believe this B.S. story?

    Hmmm, my mtb with Avid hydro brakes sitting in my garage with current temps of -1F (and -20F low temps the last few nights) is fully functional.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    I forget the precise temperature, but I'll never forget a bitterly cold decent of Mt. Ventoux. Gray day. Wind chills. Hydraulic fluid froze rock solid in the brake lines. Failing to navigate a turn, I crashed hard.

    Awoke in a hospital with a sack of dust and components on the chair next to me. Doc explained it was so cold the brittle carbon just shattered into countless tiny bits. They swept up what they could and brought it to me.
    sounds like Total Protonic Reversal to me

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearDaddy View Post
    LOL. You actually believe this B.S. story?

    Hmmm, my mtb with Avid hydro brakes sitting in my garage with current temps of -1F (and -20F low temps the last few nights) is fully functional.
    That's right! Oil doesn't freeze at 32F. Might lose much of it's viscosity, though. There's no headwind in your garage, either.

  23. #48
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    did some riding in winter back in Ontario down to about -10C. but doing that on the road is difficult. we had down booties made and put electric socks in them. no fun though

    now where I live it rarely get below zero C. However I mainly do mtn biking in winter, as I can do it in shorts and t shirt down to 5C, and marbe short+ long sleeve jersey if it is 0C.

    And I do about 5 weeks in arizona in winter too! 25C today here I have ridden almost every day last 2.5 weeks and didn't even need to use my arm warmers. lost 3 lbs over xmas season, lol
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek_5200 View Post
    actually it was well organized. i was spent and my support suggested me and another ride which completed it end it there. the third rider never made it up the climb
    Wise choice. If "spent," you're probably dehydrated, out of carbs, and would chill quickly descending at 45 mph.

    Guess it wasn't all that warm in the valley, so there was no blanket of air to warm up. Noticed coming of Mt. Wilson, CA, as soon as I hit the smog, it was ten degrees warmer.

  25. #50
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    A couple years ago I went out for a ride in the single digits (Fahrenheit) ...for some reason 8F stands out in my mind, though I suppose it could have been 9F. Mostly did for bragging rights, and to see what the experience was like. tbh I was so overdressed that it wasn't the cold that bothered me so much as my lack of flexibility due to so many layers. But I'm in no hurry to try that again.

    This past week I got out for several ~75 minute rides when temps were around 14F and frankly they sucked. It feels invigorating for the first 45-60 minutes, but once you realize your toes or fingers are going numb it becomes a miserable chore rather instantaneously.

    Then again, you know what they say: "There Is No Such Thing As Bad Weather, Only Inappropriate Attire." Looks like I'll have plenty of opportunities in the coming weeks to work on a solution to the toes/fingers problem.

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