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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Unless you are decked out in full kit it doesn't count. Its kinda like trainer miles
    So what? . Kudos bvber!

    I rode to the grocery store yesterday, 2.4 miles r/t, layered up and warm as toast. MUT impassable; slushy, salty, snow still on the streets. 22 F, windy, totally miserable, careful to stay in the wet spots, obsessively holding my line to avoid disaster, snow building up between fenders and tires, ready to slip and crash on black ice loaded up with olive oil, yogurt and bananas on my back, and now I gotta clean the nasty crud off the bike. Forget starting up the car for such a short trip. Shoulda walked, but the load woulda been heavy.

    No way I'll resort to pedaling a bike indoors. Pure torture. So I'll go out in below freezing temps, layered up accordingly. When the toes start to get cold, in 30 to 45 minutes, I'm home. No problem.

    Here's a 3 month period to take advantage of cross training. Weight lifting and walking tone up the muscles cycling doesn't work all that well, core and arms, not to mention bone density that endurance riding compromises. The body is prepared to build up endurance in the Spring. Heavily breathing that frozen air for hours on end usually opens to door to an upper respiratory infection. I took vitamin C and mouthed a zinc tablet last night, throat feeling slightly sore.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:18 PM.

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Grip shifters were mechanically simple, the clicks held up, they never got trashed in a crash, and were virtually maintenance free, and repairable. The trouble was, rider's hands would slip on them hitting a bump or rough terrain, and they'd shift by accident. Didn't SRAM come out with a longer stationary grip, so this wouldn't happen?

    Haven't seen them on new bikes for years, probably mostly due to marketing. Riders used to make fun of grip shifters, probably because they were replaced by trigger shifters on more expensive bikes, and relegated to cheap dept. store bikes. Triggers were a functional improvement, the trade off being they were more expensive, broke in crashes, wore out in two or three years, and yes, rider has to shift through the gears one by one, no swinging "up or down the entire block in one action."
    .


    the grip shift plastic units 25 years ago were a separate unit inboard from the grip (on mtb) so you held the fixed grip to control the bike, and the index/thumb operated the shifter. I rarely have a misshift bouncing over terrain, close to zero.

    I also kind of preferred the larger diameter of vintage grip shift compared to the sleek-grip-integrated grip shift of today. but I have big hands

    I never liked grip shift for the front derailleur, and always used Shimano for that. Now MTB are 1x so no need for a left shifter.

    GS had a big surge in popularity mid 90s, and again in the early 00s. After that because so many companies were speccing them OEM, the fraction of folks who hated them got irate about it and made some noise. So today they don't come stock much any more. However GS still has a small loyal following in MTB, and that includes myself. I put on an XX1 gripshift on my good mtn bike, and an XO shifter on my other mtb, both purchased and installed new last year - these are equiv to dura-ace and ultegra on road bikes. I see they even have XX1 12-speed eagle Grip Shift now.

    brief story of Grip shift
    https://www.bikemag.com/blog/exclusi...ged-the-world/

    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:38 PM.
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  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    So what? . Kudos bvber!

    I rode to the grocery store yesterday, 2.4 miles r/t, layered up and warm as toast. MUT impassable; slushy, salty, snow still on the streets. 22 F, windy, totally miserable, careful to stay in the wet spots, obsessively holding my line to avoid disaster, snow building up between fenders and tires, ready to slip and crash on black ice loaded up with olive oil, yogurt and bananas on my back, and now I gotta clean the nasty crud off the bike. Forget starting up the car for such a short trip. Shoulda walked, but the load woulda been heavy.

    No way I'll resort to pedaling a bike indoors. Pure torture. So I'll go out in below freezing temps, layered up accordingly. When the toes start to get cold, in 30 to 45 minutes, I'm home. No problem.

    Here's a 3 month period to take advantage of cross training. Weight lifting and walking tone up the muscles cycling doesn't work all that well, core and arms, not to mention bone density that endurance riding compromises. The body is prepared to build up endurance in the Spring. Heavily breathing that frozen air for hours on end usually opens to door to an upper respiratory infection. I took vitamin C and mouthed a zinc tablet last night, throat feeling slightly sore.
    Sounds like a set of studded tires is in order.
    Too old to ride plastic

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Sounds like a set of studded tires is in order.
    Not enough room for anything larger than 32mm. Studs would probably hit the fenders on my svelte fair weather commuter. Heard riders up in Boston hammer their own studs into a set of cheap tires. If snow becomes a frequent problem, gotta get a gravel or mountain bike. Or move back to TX! It snowed once in the 10 years I was there, a dusting; gone the next day. Got around for 2 years without a car. It was wonderful.

  5. #80
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    just got a new frame to build into me winter bike. rainy winters that is, not real winter (man i hate pf30 bb though).

    yeah it's plastic, but my 5 other bikes are metal, and I am still loving the metal



    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Unless you are decked out in full kit it doesn't count. Its kinda like trainer miles
    In that case, if I rode 30 miles in the coldest temp (to me) not in full kit, it doesn't count?

  7. #82
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    Kudos to SRAM. Always liked their double click shifting, same direction, independent of the brake levers. Find it easier than having to side swipe the lever. Always hated that.

    Very interesting article. Thanks for posting!

  8. #83
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    My Saturday ride
    Coldest temperature you've ever rode in-screen-shot-2018-01-08-11.14.07-am.jpg

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