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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Convert my Casseroll to City bike??

    So, I'm tired of drop bars and want to try something new. Looking into North Roads, Albatross, On-One Mary's, etc. turned me onto the whole world of upright/city/roadster bikes. It took me a while to realize, but they fit my riding style/preferences very well. I bought my Casseroll as a commuter, and even with it's upright geometry and being on the hoods, I'm tired of staring at pavement and craning my neck. I'm ready to sit up and enjoy my surroundings, take it slow, and make my bike more utilitarian.

    Going down the rabbit hole, I've come back up jonesing for a bike like the Pashley Roadster/Skeppshult Nature Bike. What do you think, is my Cass a good candidate for this type of conversion, or am I better off just buying a bike that was made for this? BTW it's the 2012 version of the Cass with canti brakes.

  2. #2
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    It could work, but, on the purely economic level, you need to compare

    1 - the cost of the new bike, minus what you can get selling the Salsa,

    with

    2 - the cost of handlebar, stem, brake levers, shifters and cables (at least) for the conversion (plus the hassle, if that's a cost to you).

    Number 2 MIGHT save you a little money. But you will almost certainly have a better bike the other way, with a frame and other parts designed from the ground up for that geometry. With a frame designed for drop bars, getting stem length and height, etc., dialed in for a comfortable position and good handling can be tricky. Not impossible, but kind of a crap shoot.
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  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I would keep your Casseroll, and get one of these Bianchi town bikes: City / Sport | Bianchi USA
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  4. #4
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    Before you go spending tons of cash, there are a couple of things to try to get yourself more upright:

    1) More upright 40 degree stem. This one is 120mm long, but different lengths are available if you look around:

    https://www.niagaracycle.com/categor...yABEgLqj_D_BwE

    2) Tilt the handlebars up so your hoods are higher. Try this in small steps. If you raise them too high, you risk hand soreness as your wrists will be bent too much. Experiment.

    3) If those two things don't get you high enough for your liking, there is always one of these. Warning, you can't use this if your steerer is carbon!

    Delta Stem Riser Adapter

    Note: Any or all of these things may necessitate longer brake and shifter cables. Then again, you may get lucky.

    Another important thing to note is that being significantly higher will change the handling characteristics of the bike. So be careful until you get used to the change.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia View Post
    But you will almost certainly have a better bike the other way, with a frame and other parts designed from the ground up for that geometry.
    Thanks for the response. Do you really think this, though? Most of the city bikes I find online aren't readily available in the US, are ridiculously heavy (like 50 lbs), and seem to have average components. Know of any solid bikes designed around transportation that are a more manageable weight? I'm not too worried about the cheaper route. My other transportation is a $1,500 subaru and I only have the one bike, so my wife has given me her blessing to invest a bit to get the transportation rig that I want.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Before you go spending tons of cash, there are a couple of things to try to get yourself more upright:

    1) More upright 40 degree stem. This one is 120mm long, but different lengths are available if you look around:

    https://www.niagaracycle.com/categor...yABEgLqj_D_BwE

    2) Tilt the handlebars up so your hoods are higher. Try this in small steps. If you raise them too high, you risk hand soreness as your wrists will be bent too much. Experiment.

    3) If those two things don't get you high enough for your liking, there is always one of these. Warning, you can't use this if your steerer is carbon!

    Delta Stem Riser Adapter

    Note: Any or all of these things may necessitate longer brake and shifter cables. Then again, you may get lucky.

    Another important thing to note is that being significantly higher will change the handling characteristics of the bike. So be careful until you get used to the change.
    Thanks for the suggestions, that's good advice as far as getting more upright spending the least amount of cash. It wasn't clear at all in my first post, but I'm wanting more than just upright, though. I'd like to make some other changes to the bike to make it better for transportation. A couple of other changes that come to mind:

    1) Add a chain guard, which will require dropping the crankset to a single. I don't mind this as I currently never shift out of the middle gear up front.

    2) I don't like my drops/brifters for other reasons. I wear leather mittens in the winter and trying to brake from the hoods with those going downhill is shaky at best, and shifting with brifters using them is always a challenge. I think a north roads bar with something like Paul Thumbies would work much better.

    So, with all of these changes, it seems like I just want a different bike. The problem is, good city bikes out there seem few and far between. They're super heavy, generally have less than desireable components, and are often 3 speed. I'm not a weight weanie, but I do have one big hill on my commute and don't want to arrive at work drenched in the summer. I feel like there's a balance between an 18 lb racer and a 50lb roadster that the market is super short on. That's my main reason for wanting to convert the Salsa. I feel like converting could get me a nimbleish city bike clocking in at around 35 lbs.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by steinman View Post
    Thanks for the response. Do you really think this, though? Most of the city bikes I find online aren't readily available in the US, are ridiculously heavy (like 50 lbs), and seem to have average components. Know of any solid bikes designed around transportation that are a more manageable weight? I'm not too worried about the cheaper route. My other transportation is a $1,500 subaru and I only have the one bike, so my wife has given me her blessing to invest a bit to get the transportation rig that I want.



    Thanks for the suggestions, that's good advice as far as getting more upright spending the least amount of cash. It wasn't clear at all in my first post, but I'm wanting more than just upright, though. I'd like to make some other changes to the bike to make it better for transportation. A couple of other changes that come to mind:

    1) Add a chain guard, which will require dropping the crankset to a single. I don't mind this as I currently never shift out of the middle gear up front.

    2) I don't like my drops/brifters for other reasons. I wear leather mittens in the winter and trying to brake from the hoods with those going downhill is shaky at best, and shifting with brifters using them is always a challenge. I think a north roads bar with something like Paul Thumbies would work much better.

    So, with all of these changes, it seems like I just want a different bike. The problem is, good city bikes out there seem few and far between. They're super heavy, generally have less than desireable components, and are often 3 speed. I'm not a weight weanie, but I do have one big hill on my commute and don't want to arrive at work drenched in the summer. I feel like there's a balance between an 18 lb racer and a 50lb roadster that the market is super short on. That's my main reason for wanting to convert the Salsa. I feel like converting could get me a nimbleish city bike clocking in at around 35 lbs.
    AllCity pony express? Couldn't quote a weight, but I'd imagine it's not ridiculous. More flat bar than upright, but it might be pretty close.


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  7. #7
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    BMC Alpenchallenge?

  8. #8
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    I went through this several years ago with an old Cannondale touring bike. My solution? An adjustable stem. Brought the bars up and back for commuting, and a few seconds with a wrench, and it could be back to "classic" position.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    An adjustable stem.
    I don't recommend these. I tried one once that creaked after not too long. It freaked me out, so I ditched it.

    If you want two different positions for difference occasions, get two stems and swap out when necessary. I don't think adjustable stems are safe.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



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