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  1. #1
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    cx bike for do it all

    and sell everything else?

  2. #2
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    already done

    The "Quiver Killers"

  3. #3
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    Yes and no, I think it depends on what you mean by "do it all".

    I think a CX/ Gravel bike is a bit of a "Jack of all trades, master of none" sort of deal. While you could potentially ride it anywhere, how well it performs in those environments is the question.

    I have my S-Works race bike and my Gravel bike. I use my gravel bike as a wet weather road bike, but also change wheels/ tyres and use it for off road, gravel, single track rides. It is extremely versatile, but it's not quite as light, snappy or fast as my road bike for pure road riding, nor is it able to compete with mountain bikes on the truly rough stuff.

    If I could "only" have one bike, a CX/ Gravel bike would be ok, but you ride it with the limitations that come with it. Really depends on what your expectations and conditions of use are.

  4. #4
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    use a torque wrench

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    Not sure that really answers the OP question - he sold his gravel bike as he wanted to train and race CX on his CX bike alone. He also has 2 x mtb in his stable and although I did skip through the video in places, didn't see him doing any road riding at all (although I may have missed it).

  6. #6
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    The trend to gravel bikes is bringing up some interesting solutions.

    But y'know, after watching mm's video commentary, I come away thinking I need two bikes. The range of performance requirements from ungraded dirt roads to smooth macadam are sufficiently wide, that one bike won't do either without compromise. So I end up with one bike that does everything, but nothing very well, or a bike that rides great on dirt but responds slowly on the road, or a bike that responds like a Ferrari on the road but flips all over the place on a dirt track.

    So I'll stick with two road bikes. One, a serious race bike with 25 mm tires, the other a commuter bike with 28 mm tires, fenders and rack, slightly more under geared, with more relaxed angles. Both are interchangeable in events, club rides, and such. The differences in speeds aren't that much. It's just that the race bike is quick and responsive, climbs like a bandit, and the seat is a cm forward over the crank. I can spin fast on it and deliver great sprint and climbing power. The saddle set back on the commuter encourages a more stepping motion, like walking, which is great at low to moderate intensity, but more awkward at higher cadences.

    Have to admit, the commuter gets ridden more in my urban environment. But the race bike goes fine on the streets, too. It's a bit twitchier and over geared for city traffic, but really shines on long excursions on country roads or MUTs. The commuter is great for shorter rides in town, shopping, errands, etc. It also rides well loaded up with panniers.

    Sure, changing wheels would do it, but 28 mm tires on the race bike counteracted the sprightly aggressive handling the bike was designed for. 25 mm tires on the commuter felt inadequate compared to the 28s riding with a backpack or panniers. And neither would handle dirt or gravel satisfactorily.

    Get two bikes. One for the roads, another for the dirt trails, fire roads. Customize tires accordingly.

    N + 1. It's also nice to have one backup in case the primary ride is down for maintenance.

  7. #7
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    going the other direction here. i have a commuter/tour oriented 'cx bike' and I was riding an old Sworks Tarmac too. More recently I got more of a 'quiver killer.' A Ti breakaway road bike with sort of racing-to-endurance geometry also curves rear stays. I put on 25c gator hardshell tires and in winter the Crudracer fenders. really wide 22sp gear range with 50-34 and 12-40 on the back. Got a bucket full of rackless bikepacking bags for it, so can do weekend getaways too. I find it handles the gravel trails here just fine, even shor stretches of snow recently, so the cx bike for me is overkill and feels too slow (also have issues with heel clearance, but not on the new road bike). Now I think I am close to finding the cx bike redundant and not worthy of keeping except for actually doing cx races. Really loving this new bike after its first year (though would be happier with 15mm longer TT)

    mountain bikes .. from my cold dead hand
    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:05 AM.

  8. #8
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    Currently riding a Specialized Diverge carbon wich I've turned into a very comfortable and snappy enough road bike with upgraded rims and 28cc road racing tires. I do not regret having sold my Tarmac Sworks and my Camber. I don't race and it's good to have a bike I can throw everything I want at it. Broken tarmac riding,commuting,group rides,urban..you name it,this bike is ready to answer any call.
    When the Diverge was launched Specialized called it their gravel bike,only to correct that to "allroad/adventure " bike when their real gravel bike came out,the Sequoia.
    I don't have time to ride and own 2 bikes at the moment,the Diverge is my perfect "one bike collection". But ehi,I'm losing sleep over my next bike already of course,wich happens to be the Roadmachine...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    and sell everything else?
    Blasphemy!
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    N + 1. It's also nice to have one backup in case the primary ride is down for maintenance.
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Blasphemy!
    Exactly!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  11. #11
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    I've been mulling this idea over as well. I have a carbon Crux, so why not sell my Tarmac and get a set of wheels with slick tires for the Crux? I race CX so I have to keep the Crux, but I haven't jumped into road racing so there isn't much of a point to have a dedicated road bike. Seems to me that the Cruz geometry and stiffness is good enough for the training rides, group rides, and occasional longer charity type rides that I do.

    Then again, the tarmac is already paid off so why get rid of one of my bikes at all?

  12. #12
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    Some people like to use multi-tools, some like dedicated tools. It all depends on how much of each thing you do and are you alright with the compromises. I have a race bike, endurance bike and CX bike. Granted none of which are in the super expensive category, but I enjoy each differently. The geometry of each of the bikes are all different.

  13. #13
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    I have a 1st gen Foil, alu road bike, HT, and FS....and i just bought a CX for gravel racing and go anywhere touring.

    The only bike it's going to push out of the stable is the alu road bike since it will take on touring duties.

    It will take a lot of the gravel use away from the HT but I will still need it for when conditions are more ideal for it than CX bike. Also always need to backup the FS. And finally I just like HTs even though my neck might not.

    If i were to have one do all bike it would be the HT as it would allow me to MTB still. Making it fast elsewhere is just a matter of tires and wheelsets.




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  14. #14
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    I wouldn't sell any of my bikes unless I had to. I like having backup bikes when my main road or mtn bike is in the shop. I like my stable... 2 mountain bikes (29er & 26er), gravel bike and 2 road bikes. Works for me.
    Fred-li-ness is not a virtue, it's a way of life.

    Embark on Fredly endeavors.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    More recently I got more of a 'quiver killer.' A Ti breakaway road bike with sort of racing-to-endurance geometry also curves rear stays. I put on 25c gator hardshell tires and in winter the Crudracer fenders. really wide 22sp gear range with 50-34 and 12-40 on the back. Got a bucket full of rackless bikepacking bags for it, so can do weekend getaways too. I find it handles the gravel trails here just fine, even shor stretches of snow recently, so the cx bike for me is overkill and feels too slow (also have issues with heel clearance, but not on the new road bike).
    Hey, I too recently picked up a Ritchey Breakaway TI for a helluva deal. I started with a Surly CrossCheck as my do it all bike and aside from being heavy, I was happy with it being my daily commuter and long ride bike... until the itch came and I picked up a road bike. I was shown the light on what a proper (abeit not properly running) road bike can do. I don't commute with the Breakaway because its too nice, but I have thought about a more road oriented bike as a commuter.

    OT: what kind of bikepacking bags did you get for your breakaway?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    and sell everything else?
    Yes... well, sell most of your other bikes.

    I'm primarily a roadie and use my CX bike for crushed gravel trails, light off-roading, and occasional road riding when the roads are bad. I have a nice road bike, but I've found that when I ride my CX bike on the roads, it's more comfortable due to the larger tires and my average speed is almost identical! (I don't have any power meters, so average speed is all I have for comparison at this time.) So it's fair to say that I personally could dump my road bike and just keep my CX bike.

    However, my CX bike can't replace my mountain bike. Sure, I could ride my CX bike on the more challenging off-road trails, but my body would suffer due to the lack of any suspension.

    To me, the benefits of a owning one bike are quite appealing:


    • The bike will always fit exactly the same because it's the only one you have... potentially eliminating pain or discomfort from your body trying to adjust to different bikes.
    • Maintenance costs should go down. You'll only have 1 chain to replace, one set of tires to replace, etc.
    • You'll have more money to spend on parts and accessories. Instead of spending $1k+ on a second bike, you could spend that money on a better wheel set (or whatever) on your primary bike.
    • You'll be maximizing your investment. Since you only have 1 body, you can only ride 1 bike at a time. If you ride the same bike all the time, it's cost-per-use goes way down.
    • You might have more time for other things since you won't need to maintain several bikes. (That reminds me, I have to start "spring cleaning" my fleet of bikes... ugh.)


    Note that your LBS and the bike manufacturers don't think it's a good idea to only have one bike, but then again, it's their own fault for making CX and gravel bikes so versatile!

  17. #17
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    A bike that does everything is a bike that's not going to be good at anything... I'm an ex downhill racer and now turned roadie and wanted something i can do fair a bit of dirt with. So I built a bike out of an old entry level hardtail frame (year 2000) and donated garage parts from a bunch of my buddies and came out with a pretty cool adventure bike... Does all day road stuff to mixed terrain to everestings and even rides double black downhill stuff. How I'm doing this is two wheelsets... a set with roadie slicks and a set with knobbies. W/ old school outdated parts it comes in at 24lbs... Got the bike running in for something like $150... Does it replace the road bike? No... Does it replace the mountain bikes? No... Will you end up riding it more than your other bikes because it's fun? Yes...

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BQohBWXA...y=mrpercussive

    https://www.instagram.com/p/BQohBWXA...y=mrpercussive

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrpercussive View Post
    A bike that does everything is a bike that's not going to be great at anything...
    Fixed that for you.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by headloss View Post
    Fixed that for you.
    Haha... Yupp... :P

  20. #20
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    "N + 1. It's also nice to have one backup in case the primary ride is down for maintenance"

    I believe that the important full equation is: N+1 less than or equal to D-1.

    Sorry, I can't get my computer to use the alt-Gr version that gives the correct mathematical symbol.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jason124 View Post
    OT: what kind of bikepacking bags did you get for your breakaway?
    mainly Apidura. such well made bags. though I use a Blackburn Outpost frame bag - also a brilliant design

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