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  1. #1
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    Cycling and gout

    Any of the older guys on here have gout? Turning 45 soon and the last few months I am getting the symptoms of gout in my big toe and ball of foot. Yesterdays ride was the first one ever that it caused me pain on the ride. Tighten down the shoes so I couldn't move my foot and then forgot about it and made it home. Any suggestions for riding with it?

  2. #2
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    I don't even notice it until I have a flare-up, and when I do, there won't be any riding for a week or more. Walking isn't even an option sometimes. With a massive consumption of cherries, cherry juice, and cherry tablets, I can usually be mobile again in 2-3 days.

    I'm guessing you're just having the beginning symptoms, because when there's a gout flare-up, you can't even think about putting on a shoe.
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  3. #3
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    correct, thanks, i have heard about the cherries, never tried them yet, going to the store today.

  4. #4
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    I hate to say this, but "don't ride with it". I'm not a doc, but an engineer who is genetically cursed with a presisposition to have gout. I have had major and minor flare ups since I was in my late 20s (am 51 now). As a runner and cyclist, I always tried to power through even the worst episodes. I took a lot of heavy anti-inflamitory drugs and just went on about it. Finally, about 10 years ago, on advice of my conscience (aka the wife), I visited a good rheumatologist who pointed out that long-term gouty inflammation will permanently damage joints (think of it as metal filings in a gear box), and long-term usage of potent inflammitories isn't terrible good for critical organs.

    I don't mean to frighten anyone. Diagnosis and proper treatment of gout isn't tough. I had to give some blood samples, and urinate in a jug for a few days to determine whether I was an over-producer or an under-excreter of uric acid. It turns out that I'm an over-producer, and all the dietary changes I could make wouldn't help me out. So the doctor presecribed a once-a-day dosage of allopurinol that has basically made me gout free. And there really haven't been any side effects.

    OP, gout is a nasty problem. But it can be handled pretty easily. Best of Luck!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    I don't even notice it until I have a flare-up, and when I do, there won't be any riding for a week or more. Walking isn't even an option sometimes. With a massive consumption of cherries, cherry juice, and cherry tablets, I can usually be mobile again in 2-3 days.

    I'm guessing you're just having the beginning symptoms, because when there's a gout flare-up, you can't even think about putting on a shoe.
    Amen to this, PlatyPius. There were times I couldn't even stand the weight of a sheet on top of my toes when sleeping! Nasty stuff!

    Glad the cherry treatment works for you! Natural remedies just didn't work often for me.

  6. #6
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    I usually have a gout flare up every few years. I'm 45 and have had it hit me 5 times since I was 33. It's probably about time for it to strike yet again.

    Anyways, like the other guys said, I won't even walk on my foot if I have an attack, let alone wear any type of shoe. In addition to drinking more fluids, I take 1000 milligrams of vitamin C every day. It has staved off the attacks in a big way. Riding when I'm rather dehydrated will set off an attack every time. Hydration, coupled with vitamin C has helped me in a big way. However, for no reason and without warning, I'll some times have a gout attack.

  7. #7
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    I'm 37 and recently had my first outbreak in my left elbow. No way I could ride when it was at full effect. Couldn't extend my arm, couldn't sleep, sure as hell couldn't put weight on it.

    Doc wouldn't give me anything except 100 500mg ibuprofen and a lecture about dehydration and alcohol.

    She was right though. The episode started right after I spent 3 nights in a row doing tile work in a house my friend is flipping. No a/c, pouring sweat, and we kept drinking beer instead of water. Dumb.

    I've since cut down a lot on soda, totally eliminated my ice tea habit (was drinking about a quart a night for years), drink a lot more water while in my office all day and have been religious with the 1000mg of vitamin c every day.

    By the way - the cherry juice didn't help me one bit.

  8. #8
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    On a daily allopurinol regimen. I agree that riding with gout is impossible during a flare up. I can barely walk. BTW just had a flare up last week and got the new drug Colcrys which is a new name for colchicine . I rode as soon as the symptoms subsided.

  9. #9
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    I'm in the same club, only had two bouts which were right after each other. I used Colcrys and was over it in 3 days. If you read about colchicine its pretty nasty stuff.
    Hopefully drinking tons of water daily will avoid any re-occurrences. Cherries are out of season so I ate some strained, cherry pie filling we had on hand . Ironically, gout was gone the next day. My flare up happened after a dry CX race and I was probably dehydrated as well. Seems to be a theme

  10. #10
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    In the same boat as many on this thread. Long history. It can be managed fairly well. Get tested for uric acid levels and if cause is excessive secretion which is most common then daily dosage of allopirinol will curtail. At first sign start taking OTC anti-inflammatory as opposed to prescribed as they are very harsh. Virtually impossible to ride during an attack as I can't even get my shoe on. Best approach is try to manage daily and address immediately at first symptoms.

  11. #11
    Kilt wearing, old man
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    I'd suggest that you see a medical professional, and determine if what you have is gout, or the early stages of something else. Such as a neuroma. Both may initially respond to anti-inflammatory drugs, but long term treatment is a bit different.
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  12. #12
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    Thanks, already have an appt to verify next week.

  13. #13
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    I just wanted to share this info with all of you. If you know of anyone that suffers from bouts of gout, please share this info with them., I'm glad to hear you got such speedy and simple relief from your gout, and thanks for posting the remedy. I'll be sharing it with my mother-in-law who's 83, and who recently had a very bad time with gout - in her hands also.

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    I have my mom and grandma to thank for my gout. Was diagnosed in my mid-30's and pretty much have it under control through diet (cut out red meat, red wine occasionally instead of daily, less tomato products), and drink tons of water. My real vice is drinking coffee, which if I don't follow with heavy doses of water can cause a flare up. I agree that it's really debilitating when a flare up occurs (mostly around the ball of my foot or ankle), making putting on a shoe nearly impossible and forget about a sheet touching it when trying to sleep. I do use some of the medications mentioned but do my best to get by without them. Usually in for 5-7 days of misery.

  15. #15
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    1846 called. It wants its ailment back.

    Just kidding. And tempting fate.

  16. #16
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    I first got it in my early 30's and took Colchicine to get rid of it. Not a nice drug and i ended up have a day off work becuase of the side effects rather than the Gout.

    it got me on the ball of the right foot, under the big toe and was murder, not even painkillers to dent it. My father use to get it in his elbows and knees, which would be worse.

    Although now I have to take it 2 a day anyhow (it is a treatment for something else) so the likelihood that i ever get gout again is small.

  17. #17
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    I went to a podiatrist for a completely unrelated matter & he told my I had gout. I didn't even know it. He told me to drink 8-10 glasses of water per day, which I did, went back in a week & it was gone. To the best of my knowledge that's the only time I had it & I experienced absolutely no symptoms.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Versatile View Post
    I went to a podiatrist for a completely unrelated matter & he told my I had gout. I didn't even know it. He told me to drink 8-10 glasses of water per day, which I did, went back in a week & it was gone. To the best of my knowledge that's the only time I had it & I experienced absolutely no symptoms.
    I wonder what clued the MD in on his/her diagnosis? For me it was diagnosed through a blood test with high levels of uric acid. You are very fortunate not have this problem.

  19. #19
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    Hi,

    Having suffered the misery of gout myself I just wanted to contribute to this thread:

    At age 52 I started getting gout episodes over a couple of years ago. Then discovered that taking vitamin C (1500mg a day) was enough in my case to (after a few months) completely stop my attacks (it does this by lowering your serum uric acid but it is not a drug with nasty side-effects like allopurinal) - I have been gout free ever since.

    Also, for those still currently suffering - the best thing that I ever discovered was a level teaspoonful of baking soda taken dissolved in a glass of water 3 or 4 times a day. You can feel the pain and the attack easing after only a couple of these doses because it raises the pH of your blood helping the uric acid crystals in your joints to re-dissolve.

    But do not use baking soda if you have elevated bp because it contains lot's of sodium which has the side effect of also raising your blood pressure. So, if you try this please monitor your bp carefully but at least for me this was the only thing that really eased and also significantly shortened each attack.

    Finally, I would not ride during an attack - there are literally the equivalent of shards of glass inside your joints! It will do some permanent damage.

    My pennies...

  20. #20
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    I've been suffering from chronic gout since I was 17 (32 now), I take 300mg of Allopurinal daily like others do. My first recommendation is to change your diet TODAY. Research what foods are gout friendly and change your lifestyle. I've been gout attack free since November 2009 which is the longest in my adult life.

    The medication helps, but when I made the plunge and changed my entire diet is what made the biggest impact. I'd recommend to go veg for 3-5 weeks as a good jump start, then limit your meat intake.

    I can also swig apple cider vinegar out of the bottle now, lol. This helps with flare ups, but I'd recommend to dilute a cap full with some water before going straight out of the bottle. The first time I puked all over the kitchen. fun times.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlurpeeKing View Post
    I've been suffering from chronic gout since I was 17 (32 now), I take 300mg of Allopurinal daily like others do. My first recommendation is to change your diet TODAY. Research what foods are gout friendly and change your lifestyle. I've been gout attack free since November 2009 which is the longest in my adult life.

    The medication helps, but when I made the plunge and changed my entire diet is what made the biggest impact. I'd recommend to go veg for 3-5 weeks as a good jump start, then limit your meat intake.

    I can also swig apple cider vinegar out of the bottle now, lol. This helps with flare ups, but I'd recommend to dilute a cap full with some water before going straight out of the bottle. The first time I puked all over the kitchen. fun times.
    I bought ACV after reading all the multiple health claims regarding it - I can't honestly say that it did anything (at least confirmed or noticeable) for my particular case of gout. But it sure tastes nice and especially if you like putting vinegar on your food (which I sure do after growing up in the UK - eating fish n' chips etc...).

    The only two things that have REALLY worked for me are vitamin C and baking soda - both are pretty much confirmed to be effective (at least for me). Also, a possible third helper (but still unconfirmed) would be eating handfuls of dried tart cherries.

    In the case of baking soda it is the ONLY thing that really helps me if/when an attack starts proper (but then I also have to monitor my bp carefully as it starts to rise after three or four doses).

    Gout sucks! Everyone is different and what works for one guy often doesn't for another - keep that in mind as you experiment.

  22. #22
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    Life with gout. I am so sorry ... This stuff is painful ...

    I have had chronic gout since 2004, literally everyday (steroids did not even work at first) - literally bedridden at times ... I had to give up all sports, etc. I am just getting back to cycling again ....

    From the doctors I have been to and two gout clinics, IMO it is basically a guessing game as to what will work for each person. For instance, for meat, I may only eat chicken and turkey bacon. That is it. Hopefully, you will be different. There is only so many ways to serve chicken. My wife knows them all ....

    Though i'm not a physician, what worked for me was:

    Drink water: I drink at least 16 cups per day. This helps keep down on the number of my attacks.

    Find out what is triggering it - probably a protein source - fish, omega items, pork, egg whites, milk, etc. all may be the culprit ...

    Now for the kicker, South Beach diet, which is high in protein, actually worked in reducing the number of attacks, or as in my case a CONTINOUS attack ..... once I discovered my triggers then I ate the SBD foods which did not contain what makes me ill .... There are several great dishes in the diet plan - really ....but it takes a lot of prep time ...especially at first.

    I am down now to 2-3 attacks per year (mine rotates from the big toe, to knees, elbows, and even my ears - it is bad enough every other place, but you do not desire it in your ears ...
    Sincerely,
    D

  23. #23
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    The doc told me that "under a microscope, they look like jagged razors." One thing for sure, they feel like razors f!!!!ng digging in.

    My gout went away after my new healthy lifestyle. No more meds plus I'll probably live longer. 💪

  24. #24
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    I had a flare starting the other day. I had been on vacation and went too heavy on the booze and rich food. I'm not too good about taking my allopurinol regularly, but if I get on it, I can catch it before it is too bad. When I got home, my foot was sore. I took a ride, and it was gone by the end of the cruise.
    A couple of days later was my physical and the blood test still showed high acid.

  25. #25
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    Worth saying.....

    Even taking drugs like allopurinol does not guarantee that you will have no gout attacks. So I have decided not to take ANY drugs personally and instead just to address the possible gout attack problem myself - so far this has been working for me.

    I believe that my own tendency to get gout is probably much milder than many poor souls - I think because one benefit of my physically active lifestyle is that it has made me pretty lean and in good shape overall. I believe that this helps a ton with problems like gout! Don't ignore exercise because you find out that you suffer from gout - it is all the more reason to get out there and work harder and lose weight (although not during an attack).

    Prevention-wise cherries are worth mentioning. Apart from tasting great they apparently work for a lot of people and so far I am gout free on them. Fresh, extract, juice, powdered - whatever it apparently makes no difference.

    I eat a handful of dried tart cherries a day - not a problem for me because they also taste great (and you can stick them in your jersey pocket for a small snack on a ride).

    Everyone with gout should try to figure out their own solutions and what actually works for them.

    Cherries (and vitamin C) might be something that the drug companies would prefer you not to discover. Although if you go out and drink 15-20 beers you will probably have an attack even on allopurinol.

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