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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Noise isn't part of the equation. If anything, Campy drivelines are louder than Shimano which are church quiet when set up properly down to the click to change gears...Campy shifts more of a snap many prefer for greater feedback that a shift has been effectuated.
    Noise is part of my equation. I have shimano on my MTB and Campy on my RB. My campy is silent. Shimano, not so much. I like silent. Snapping into gear on campy? Not on my chorus. The shifts are strong, precise, instant and like buttah, barely audible unless I'm making a major downshift.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    Noise is part of my equation. I have shimano on my MTB and Campy on my RB. My campy is silent. Shimano, not so much. I like silent. Snapping into gear on campy? Not on my chorus. The shifts are strong, precise, instant and like buttah, barely audible unless I'm making a major downshift.
    I have set up hundreds of each. You will take your data points and I will take my data base. Pretty common knowledge what the difference is between groupsets, It is the character of shifting differences as much as the physical method of shifting that separates the two brands. Campy = Snap, Shimano less discernible Click. Racing either aka Shimano for many in the heat of the battle a more subtle engagement aka soft click is less appreciated than Campy which is a more discernible snap up the cassette aka downshift and more slams down the cassette with thumb push for upshift.

    Campy with its lineage and pedigree gets it right for many purists who want more tactile feedback for each shift. DA and Utegra shift beautifully but don't have the same distinct shift quality of Campy...and of course Campy loyalists...many of whom who have ridden Shimano at some point, vastly prefer more separation of upshift and downshift with thumb lever well separated from lever behind a fixed brake lever.
    Last edited by 11spd; 01-31-2018 at 07:08 AM.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Or make you look down your nose at others running perceived lesser group sets?
    Absolutely not, but you feel secure enough to not start threads like this.

  4. #29
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    If you can show up on your regular group ride on a vintage bike with a Campy gruppo and still rip the legs off your riding partners then you are allowed a certain level of snobbery.


    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Or make you look down your nose at others running perceived lesser group sets?

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    I have set up hundreds of each. You will take your data points and I will take my data base. Pretty common knowledge what the difference is between groupsets, It is the character of shifting differences as much as the physical method of shifting that separates the two brands. Campy = Snap, Shimano less discernible click...Shimano for many in the heat of the battle ie. racing less appreciated than Campy. Campy with its lineage and pedigree gets it right for purists who want more tactile feedback for each shift.
    I prefer my anecdotes to your reality. I forgot to mention, I ride NOS Campy 8-spd Record and Chorus, always with a clean chain and a clean drivetrain. Crazy how quiet that is. ALthough, truth be told, my hearing is probably not what it used to be.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by splke View Post
    i prefer my anecdotes to your reality. :d i forgot to mention, i ride nos campy 8-spd record and chorus, always with a clean chain and a clean drivetrain. Crazy how quiet that is. Although, truth be told, my hearing is probably not what it used to be.
    ok

  7. #32
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    Unless you're rocking the Super Record, everything else from Campy sucks.... including that $550 full Ti cassette. lol

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keoki View Post
    Unless you're rocking the Super Record, everything else from Campy sucks.... including that $550 full Ti cassette. lol
    Shows how little you know about Campy. In a blind test, groupset performance diff between SR and Chorus is indistinguishable. I have an Ultrashift Centaur bike that shifts as well as Record.

  9. #34
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    Shimano is to Microsoft as Campy is to Unix.

    Shimano - Cheap. Not so serviceable, so it's throwaway time. Not so reliable. Don't care so much about compatibility between components as time progresses, introducing headaches when forced to migrate.

    Campagnolo - Reliable. Serviceable. Much less having to deal with incompatibility crap as time progresses.

    Campy also makes great wheels. Still running 15 year old Campy Neutrons (and have been using them for CX racing!).

    Gee, doesn't everybody know this already?

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    That is quite a Rube Goldberg contraption. What problem is this thing trying to solve exactly?
    Well it would stop all the chainlube threads if everyone switched! Of course then we would be talking about the most efficient string type to use.
    Gravel Rocks

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  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    Well it would stop all the chainlube threads if everyone switched! Of course then we would be talking about the most efficient string type to use.
    It looks like someone put a lot of engineering into that thing but in the end its just an excessively complicated drivetrain that offers zero benefits. Plus its expensive. It's even dumber than the ElliptiGo and that is saying a lot

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    The Stringbike groupset is much better than Campy, only a matter of time before Campy falls by the way side and real snobs convert to this......

    Stringbike
    What happens when the string drivetrain slips? Rider'll lose his nuts on that upward curving top tube, sure as sh!t!

    Chains are almost 100% efficient, too. So what's the point? Less weight? That's it.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    I have set up hundreds of each. You will take your data points and I will take my data base. Pretty common knowledge what the difference is between groupsets, It is the character of shifting differences as much as the physical method of shifting that separates the two brands. Campy = Snap, Shimano less discernible Click. Racing either aka Shimano for many in the heat of the battle a more subtle engagement aka soft click is less appreciated than Campy which is a more discernible snap up the cassette aka downshift and more slams down the cassette with thumb push for upshift.

    Campy with its lineage and pedigree gets it right for many purists who want more tactile feedback for each shift. DA and Utegra shift beautifully but don't have the same distinct shift quality of Campy...and of course Campy loyalists...many of whom who have ridden Shimano at some point, vastly prefer more separation of upshift and downshift with thumb lever well separated from lever behind a fixed brake lever.
    Exactly. Shimano users have no clue until they try it and feel the difference.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by takmanjapan View Post
    If you can show up on your regular group ride on a vintage bike with a Campy gruppo and still rip the legs off your riding partners then you are allowed a certain level of snobbery.
    I do my best, takman.

    '84 Columbus SL/SLX lugged frame, original Campy Super Record drive train, friction shifters, seat post, brakes, cables looping out of the top of levers! "Banana catchers," one riding buddy always said.

    Those little 42-23 hill attacks always work great! I'll pass 'em all at 100 rpm, just like Contador. That 21 pound steel wonder climbs like a bandit. Not only that, it passes everyone on the descents atop those silky smooth Campy bearings. We'd get some good laughs out of it!

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Chains are almost 100% efficient, too. So what's the point? Less weight? That's it.
    Oh come on! How did you overlook no lube and cleaning?

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Oh come on! How did you overlook no lube and cleaning?
    Good point! Thanks for pointing that out!

    Trouble is, for me, lubing and cleaning has always been an integral part of 1st echelon maintenance, second only to airing up the tires. I like the regular opportunity to check brake pads, clean the bar wrap, get the road grime off the BB. Lubing the chain and sprockets takes a minute or two.

    My chains have always lasted as long as I want them to. I've got it down so I can actually feel when the chain is starting to wear, for my riding style, around 3000-4000 miles.

    I don't use those funky removable master links, either, or whatever they're called. Straight chain remover tool always. If the chain breaks, chances are good its on those funky links. Saw it more than a few times at the shop. I only remove the chain once when replacing it. No big deal. The chains I use are cheap. 6 speed freewheels are cheap, too, in case I leave the chain on too long.

  17. #42
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    Campy can finally boast of a return to being premier groupsets, worthy of snobbery on par with Red and DA

    ...now that they offer hydraulic road disc brakes.

    however, they're still behind the curve on 1x drivetrains ;)

    (hey I was actual shopping for a Campy groupset this week. seriously. non disc)
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    Campy can finally boast of a return to being premier groupsets, worthy of snobbery on par with Red and DA

    ...now that they offer hydraulic road disc brakes.

    however, they're still behind the curve on 1x drivetrains ;)

    (hey I was actual shopping for a Campy groupset this week. seriously. non disc)
    A reviewer at Road Bike Action thought Campy hit it right with their disc brake offering. I wouldn't be surprised.

    Let's hope Campy skips the whole one chainring madness. First bike I bought as an adult had one gear in front and 4 in back. It shifted great. Can't imagine the technical challenges of an 11 gear spread in back. Seems like a screwy way to shave off weight.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 02-01-2018 at 01:37 AM.

  19. #44
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    Does switching to Campagnolo turn you into a Snob?

    Quote Originally Posted by GearDaddy View Post
    Shimano is to Microsoft as Campy is to Unix.

    Shimano - Cheap. Not so serviceable, so it's throwaway time. Not so reliable. Don't care so much about compatibility between components as time progresses, introducing headaches when forced to migrate.

    Campagnolo - Reliable. Serviceable. Much less having to deal with incompatibility crap as time progresses.

    Campy also makes great wheels. Still running 15 year old Campy Neutrons (and have been using them for CX racing!).

    Gee, doesn't everybody know this already?
    Not sure that this is an apt comparison. I have 10 year old Performance branded Neuvation wheels and 20 year old Mavic cxp 33 wheels with Dura Ace hubs. As to the BS about serviceability of Campy components, in theory, yes. In reality, itís a bear trying to find aftermarket parts

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by arshak; 02-01-2018 at 08:17 AM.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Shows how little you know about Campy. In a blind test, groupset performance diff between SR and Chorus is indistinguishable. I have an Ultrashift Centaur bike that shifts as well as Record.
    Well, it's much much better than anything from the s&^t company, Specialized. lol

    You butt hurt now?

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by arshak View Post
    Not sure that this is an apt comparison. I have 10 year old Performance branded Neuvation wheels and 20 year old Mavic cxp 33 wheels with Dura Ace hubs. As to the BS about serviceability of Campy components, in theory, yes. In reality, itís a bear trying to find aftermarket parts

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I think the serviceability of Campy took a bit of a hit when they switched to the newest Ultra-shift stuff. Its not like the old days of Ergo-power where you could replace a cheap g-spring and restore your levers to like-new condition. Now you have to buy a while new lever body. On the other hand there are still lots of sources for Ergopower parts and my 1999, 2002, and 2006 levers are still going strong

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by arshak View Post
    Not sure that this is an apt comparison. I have 10 year old Performance branded Neuvation wheels and 20 year old Mavic cxp 33 wheels with Dura Ace hubs. As to the BS about serviceability of Campy components, in theory, yes. In reality, itís a bear trying to find aftermarket parts

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Ha Ha but I have put these Neutrons through the ringer for many CX seasons, in Minnesota (i.e. ice, snow, mud etc). A few spoke replacements along the way (which I had no trouble finding parts and doing the work myself).

    I have an even older set of Campy Electron wheels that I got off Ebay and were already well used that are also still being used. I actually replaced hub cones in one of those wheels (again found the parts online and did the work myself).

    I also have some Mavic CXP wheels. They are clunky tanks compared to the Campy wheels. I am also the not so proud owner of some worn out and useless Mavic Crossmax SL MTB wheels. Talk about reliability and serviceability issues, Mavic is the worst with their proprietary spoke and rim designs. Try finding replacements for their special bladed spokes, and also being forced to send them to Mavic to have them serviced if you have to replace their proprietary spoke ends. I'm done with Mavic.

    I'll take the Campy wheels any day. Currently using some Zondas on the main road machine.

  23. #48
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    another cool thing about Campy - it is the only stuff in cycling that holds it value long term - at least the vintage stuff. A very active retro market for anything campy still. I have been thinking of selling my 28 yr old Athena groupset to get a new Veloce groupset. I can sell that old stuff for nearly as much as the new group will cost. The old C Record stuff sells for the MSRP it was new, in some cases (if it was cheaper I would have bought it for my 80s frame). I paid as much for 30 yr old chorus toe clip pedals last year as I did for my new Ultegra clipless

    like jewelry

    (weighing my options on this update. the one sticking point is I have Record screw-on hubs and this complicates upgrading to Veloce 10, though I could just buy a cassette hub)
    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 02-01-2018 at 02:46 PM.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    another cool thing about Campy - it is the only stuff in cycling that holds it value long term - at least the vintage stuff. A very active retro market for anything campy still. I have been thinking of selling my 28 yr old Athena groupset to get a new Veloce groupset. I can sell that old stuff for nearly as much as the new group will cost. The old C Record stuff sells for the MSRP it was new, in some cases (if it was cheaper I would have bought it for my 80s frame). I paid as much for 30 yr old chorus toe clip pedals last year as I did for my new Ultegra clipless

    like jewelry

    (weighing my options on this update. the one sticking point is I have Record screw-on hubs and this complicates upgrading to Veloce 10, though I could just buy a cassette hub)
    Speaking of which, the DeRosa Facebook page just spotted a 1990 "Professional" on ebay. It's in pristine condition, full Campy. Starting price, $3500 smackeroos.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/1990-De-Ros...75.c100623.m-1

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Speaking of which, the DeRosa Facebook page just spotted a 1990 "Professional" on ebay. It's in pristine condition, full Campy. Starting price, $3500 smackeroos.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/1990-De-Ros...75.c100623.m-1
    That's a lot of money for a bike that's probably just hang on a hook. Here's one that will probably stay affordable ($930.00 with 3 1/2 days left) that a person wouldn't have to worry about riding.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Derosa-1984....c100005.m1851
    Too old to ride plastic

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